More desert trains and a few flags

Ka-Boom! More desert trains blown up on Kieran Byrne’s  Do You Have A Flag? website, crossposted from my Sidetracked blog.

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/08/21/a-few-words-from-a-modeller-who-blows-up-his-own-desert-trains/

 

Gault Miniature Ceramic Houses

 

 

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15mm Peter Laing WW2 British Infantry proceed cautiously through a Southern French village, guided by the brave ladies of Resistance, somewhere in France Summer 1944. (Sadly both Peter Laing figures and Gault Houses have ceased production).

 

A lucky find on a collectibles or junk stall was a £10 teabag box full of a small jumbled collection of miniature ceramic French houses  produced by Gault.

 

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An old PG Tags box of tiny French houses … signed Gault Made in France.

 

I had never heard of ‘Gault Made in France’ but I saw the games potential of this ‘bric a brac’ straight away. They looked close to 15mm scale.

About Gault France ceramic houses

“The magic of Gault houses was born from the combination of the talents of 2 brothers: Jean-Pierre, architect, painter and sculptor, and Dominique, designer and businessman”. http://gault-france.com/gault-history/

Sadly ceramics  production of this attractive little French houses by Gault ceased for a while in 2001 and finally by 2010, due to the expensive production costs of these individually made and painted houses, after about thirty years of production.

This is much the same story of British firm Lilliput Lane which begin in 1982 and ceased production  in 2016 that  https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/lilliput-lane-buildings-for-15mm-figures/

Judging by the long individual making process, I am not surprised that they had high production costs:

Two months were needed to produce a house through 14 manufacturing stages. Sculpting of roofs, shaping and modelling of balconies, pavements…Natural drying, firing at 700°C; rinse-bath with oxides, painting, patina, dust removal, cold enameling at 1000°C and shop-fronts miniaturising. All those stages were necessary to produce a piece finally worthy of seal of Gault. The world of Gault: the charm weaves its spell.” http://gault-france.com

The Gault France site (above) by Stephane is the only English language site I can find about them. It is well worth a visit, a real labour of love. It features pages of a rare Japanese book about them, showing the commonest Provence range that my houses belong to and many more ranges on his website http://gault-france.com/

“J Carlton houses are made of resin instead of ceramic and are generally a bit smaller than the Gault Original (ceramic) houses. A key difference between the ceramic and resin houses is that the ceramic houses were entirely made by hand; each one was unique as the window styles, doors, business name and other aspects of the pieces was different on each one of the same model. The resin houses are made from highly precise molds and therefore each one of the same model are identical.”  Taken from http://gault-france.com website

The resin replacements of the Gault houses still produced and available on the ‘J. Carlton’ website. These are resin moulded, much brighter and, to me, have far less character or texture than the ceramic Gault originals. Like old metal figures, the ceramics also have a satisfying weighty heft about them.

Dominique Gault personally created the design for the comic little metal figurines, vehicles, and town furniture working with a French sculptor or artist  Jean-Pierre Lobel. They do not feature on Lobel’s Art Miniature range, produced surprisingly in the former French colony of Madagascar since 1995. www.figurine-artminiature.com

However the Gault / Lobel figures  are still produced in metal, hand painted and sold through J Carlton or second hand online sites.  I am not too sure of their size, online auction sites suggest about 1 inch high, but they turn these model French towns into something charming and comic, somewhere between Trumpton and Tintin. http://pxlentreprise.fr/jcarlton/categorie-produit/figurines/

This motley collection of Gault houses suggest lots of gaming possibilities, especially in 15mm (they would probably work with 10mm too).  You can mix and move the smaller side buildings around, much as you can in the traditional wooden German toy villages beloved of gamers, to create new combinations of buildings.

 

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Grainy black and white shot of Peter Laing 15mm WW2 British infantry figures still moving cautiously  through this southern French town, Summer 1944..

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It is difficult to resist moving these little houses and outhouses around to make new village or townscapes.

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Like all new gaming finds, these houses rearranged into  a square, a small hamlet or long street suggest gaming scenarios or just atmospheric scene setting.

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The red pantile roof (fairly similar to Roman roof tiles) suggests southern France or Spain, Portugal and ‘the Med’. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roof_tiles

With the bell tower, it could a Mexican, Spanish Colonial  or southern states desert village for some of my 15mm Peter Laing  Boers as cowboys or bandits with other American Civil War figures.

With some Peter Laing 15mm Romans stashed away for Christmas to look forward to as opponents  to my Peter Laing Ancient troops, I can see these working as simple Roman buildings. Instead of the maker’s mark of Gault written on the back wall, I may find the words Romans Go Home written instead!

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A more Peninsular feel to these buildings used with Peter Laing 15mm British Infantry of the Napoleonic Wars and Heroscape hexes.

I have tried the smaller Gault buildings out on 4.5 cm Heroscape hexes and they work quite well in a token ‘toy town’ kind of way.

The bigger houses do not sit so well on the hexes, an issue we discussed about ground scales, overhand etc. with hex grids. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/03/192-hexes-of-joy-affronted-by-re-basing-and-ground-scales/

However they do well enough on a felt gaming cloth.

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Napoleon (Le Petit Caporal)  stops off at “La Vielle Auberge” for “le vin” and the “Boulangerie” for his daily bread with his tiny escort and colour party of 15mm Peter Laing French Napoleonic Infantry figures.

 

Behind the scenes and underneath Gault Houses

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Signed by Gault on the back  –  ceramic graffiti – but what great texture and patina the two month Gault production process leaves.

For those who know such things, here are the maker’s marks or catalogue numbers of the pieces I picked up.

Looking on online sites, now that these Gault ceramics are out of production, even the smallest outhouse seems to be selling for at least twice the price I paid for the whole cardboard tea box of jumbled houses. A lucky day.

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.

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More maker’s marks or catalogue numbers underneath.

 

So I can now say that I own a property in Provence or two … albeit in miniature.

With thanks to Stephane’s excellent Gault-France website http://gault-france.com/gault-original/ for the information.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN or Homme d’ ETAIN (Homme de PLOMB or Man of Lead sounds even better!), 20 August 2017.

How Heroscape Hexes Measure Up

 

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Eight of these big 24 Heroscape Hex baseplates make up my fixed 192 Hexes of Joy game board.

 

As I mentioned in my reply to a blog comment by David Bradley,  I completely forgot to put the measurements on the blog post about my 192 Hexes of Joy game board.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/192-hexes-of-joy-a-larger-hex-game-board/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/03/192-hexes-of-joy-affronted-by-re-basing-and-ground-scales/

This is partly because the game board  was a “take it as found”, scrounged before skipped notice board, rather than a purchased or commercial notice board as I think Bob Cordery used. Bob may have put his board dimensions on his post.

Recent Heroscape hex-periment blogposts

I have been intrigued and  quite curious to see how Bob Cordery will incorporate these into his Portable Wargame set up. I enjoyed his stylish and smart coastlines, well worth looking at these on his blog:

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/messing-about-with-my-heroscape-terrain.html

Certainly a good miniature match for his Hexon coasts:

http://bobscolonialwargaming.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/clearing-nest-of-sea-rats.html

along with Bob’s experiments in painting or not painting, flocking or not flocking.

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/to-paint-andor-flock-or-not-to-paint.html

and Bob’s trial of which shade of green is best for your Heroscape hex gameboard.  http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/some-more-not-quite-forty-shades-of.html

I know that John Patriquin the Wargame Hermit blogger in the USA also uses a board of Heroscape hexes, all sprayed uniform green http://wargamehermit.blogspot.co.uk/2017/01/two-experimental-wargames.html

Hex-bashing

The Heroscape hexes are versatile enough that you can flock them, paint them or plant a tree on them.

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Standard desert hexes (centre) alongside my painted “desert pinky” grey hexes (left),  flocked sand and green hexes and impassable forest tree Heroscape hex experiments. I shall have to try palm trees next! 

The Heroscapers gallery section  on terrain https://www.heroscapers.com/ has some interesting ways of building walls, hedges, fences and walls of buildings around the outside of the hexes so that you  can place figures inside. Something to try perhaps for a French-Indian War or Civil War stockade fort section.

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A single Heroscape hex at 4/4.5 cm across shown with 2 bashed old Peter Laing WW2 British infantrymen – a single hex can fit 4  15mm Peter Laing or 20mm Airfix bases comfortably enough.

 

Bob Cordery measures Heroscape hex tiles at about 4cm across, but add the locking bits and I reckon that this is almost 4.5cms.

 

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‘Snowflake’ Seven Heroscape hex piece with 15mm Peter Laing artillery.

 

So the ‘seven hex’ almost snowflake pattern plates in my recent post about Peter Laing and Base Overhang are about 13.5 / 14 cms across at their three hex widest point on any side.

Heroscape Hexes also come in ones, twos, threes, snowflake sevens and 24s giving a variety of possible 3D or 2D shaped terrains.

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Twin or double hex pieces and triple hex pieces in the range of standard Heroscape colours of green, sand and grey stone. 

The eight large plates of 24 Hexes (which that fit onto my board to make the 192 hexes of Joy) are the standard Heroscape large base plate. These are about 6 Hexes wide or for each plate 24 cms at widest, 6 hexes long about 27 cms longest edge. 2 of these combine however to make a rough rectangle of only 38 cms long, as seen making up a quarter each of my hex base board (above top).

 

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192 Hexes of desert joy in 3D mode from my recent Blowing up Desert Trains scenario. 

My big 192 Hex board (an old possibly handmade but disused noticeboard) is around 79/80 cms long and 54/55 cms wide. This includes 2cms of trim at each end – effectively the trim and painted wooden gap round the edge are about 3-4cms wide, almost one hex wide.

My smaller portable game boards are two wooden box lids of 54 Hexes each. These are used as bought / found, being no carpenter, bring 40cms long, 30 cms wide including 1cm lip (3cms deep) around each side. There is some wasted space around the hex edge to box lip which I infill with AstroTurf strips for rough grass scrub. Together they make up a board of 108 Hexes, good for small fast games.

Together they would make up 300 Hexes of Joy!

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My recent ACW railway bridge crossing scenario based on my two portable game boards in box lids – 54 hexes each.

 

I have yet to put all three hex boards alongside each other, mainly as I don’t yet have a table quite big enough. I have no games room so the smaller boards have the advantage that they can be lifted off a table and put on a shelf if things like meals claim the table. The bigger board after gaming when stripped back to the 8 interlocking big hex base plates can be stowed away easily enough or even hung on the wall as modern art.

Heroscape tiles by Hasbro / MB are currently long out of production but the starter Master Sets are fairly cheaply available on UK eBay (usually the first Master Set called Rise of the Valkyries) and with more variety on American eBay including the Superhero variants.

On Amazon pricing is bizarre – complete Heroscape new starter sets and sequels are in the £200 to £300 plus region!

However on EBay you currently pay anything from £20 for just the completist set of hex tiles through to £50-60 for a used slightly bashed starter set; Some people split sets and sell components. Beware that you can pay a lot of money on some sites for individual specialist tiles, trees, mountain sections etc. More about these sets and web links on

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/heroscape-duelling-in-the-garden/

These master starter sets contain 85 interlocking tile sections, made up of:
8 x 24 tiles, enough for the base of my board of 192 Hexes of Joy!
and then the interesting extras that give the 3D-ness:

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15mm Peter Laing priest and his flock on a single hex, flocked preaching mound next to the abbey remains (Heroscape ruin) 

2 ruin corners, which need a bit of work like upper floors to make them useful
10 x triple hexes (like a triangle),
10 ‘snowflake’ seven Hexes,
10 double hexes,
26 single hexes
21 fairly flimsy thin blue water tiles.
These hexes are in a variety of colours:  sand, grey rock, green grass.

Oh and 30 bizarre painted fantasy figures (see previous blogposts) https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/heroscape-duelling-figures/

Further ideas or alternatives 

Lots of terrain and hex modification ideas at the gallery at the Heroscapers.com fan forum https://www.heroscapers.com/community/gallery/browseimages.php?do=browseimages&c=9

I have never bought the Hexon 10cm hex system that many other gamers like Bob Cordery also use for their games. I get the feeling from other blogs that it is quite expensive but you may prefer the look, size and flexibility. Each to their happy own!

I generally want smaller hexes in a smaller cluttered playing area for skirmish games like Donald Featherstone’s ‘Close Wars’ (appendix to his 1962 book Wargames) so the 4/4.5 cm hexes suit me from 15mm and 20mm through to 40mm figures. It might even stretch to 54mm figures on the usual 2p bases for very small skirmishes or duels.

The Hexon website for those who want to check these out is:  https://www.kallistra.co.uk/index.php?page=37#anchor262386

Wishing you joy of your hex, whatever size.

Blogposted by  Mark, Man of TIN blog, 16 August 2017

 

WW1 Airfix Railway scenario inspiration

 

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One of the Airfix and railways  photographs that inspired me as a 1970s child …

 

I recently rediscovered a wonderful little article in Railway Modeller  April 1976 issue  in its  ‘Junior Modeller’ section. It was written  by 15 year old Julian Chambers, based around his WW1 battlefield light railway using WW1 Airfix figures, tank and airplanes.

I read and reread this article many, many times as a 1970s child. I had these figures myself. If only the tiny men could be moved about though …

I have scanned the whole article and its photos onto my Sidetracked blog, to share it and also that I can’t lose it again for the next thirty / forty years.  Enjoy!

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/08/15/inspirational-articles-no-1-ww1-railway/

Airfix Figures and Railway Track? 

This has distracted or Sidetracked me only momentarily from an 1840s railway linked gaming scenario with Airfix figures that I am currently working on … and given me few ideas how to do this. Back to the painting and research desk!

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN, 15 August 2017.

 

Toy Soldiers on a Plate

 

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The whole plate with my toy soldier  parade design

On a rainy day on a recent seaside holiday, various members of my family booked in for a ‘paint your own ceramics’ workshop for a couple of hours including tea and cake.

As the only man there that afternoon amongst assorted female holidaymakers of all ages, I declined the more  floral patterns and the seaside inspired designs to design and paint  my very own ceramic toy soldier parade on a plate.  

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Upside down soldiers the right way up …

Thinking of those wonderful Herald plastic toy soldier guardsmen or the Britain’s hollowcast lead bands and parades, the Airfix Guards Colour Party set amongst others, I sketched these figures freehand out on an unfired ceramic plate in pencil.

I wanted a 1950s / 1960s nursery tea set ceramics feel, so kept the design nice and loose.

 

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Setting a swinging pace to the plate this cheery bandleader or drum major.

What was so different from painting real toy soldiers with acrylic or enamel model paints, matt or gloss, is that ceramic paints are a different colour (almost pastel and chalky) from how they appear on ceramics when fired.

With ceramic paints you have no strong idea how the design will look when finished, other than the helpful colour range plates to look at when choosing paints. These have the final fired colour and paint name marked on, which  gives you some idea which ceramic red paint is closest to a Guardsman’s scarlet jacket for example.

The eventual fired richness of colour and coverage were not always in places (such as deep blue trousers) what I had envisaged or was used to from a model paint tin but I was still very happy with my first attempt.

Several days later, the collection and reveal of the fired plate was quite exciting, wondering –  Had it survived firing? Would it look alright?

 

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Angria Arise!  The scarlet red banner of the rising sun that I designed for the Bronte Imagi-Nation country of Angria. This makes them an Angrian Guards Regiment Band.

The original light touch pencil sketch marks are burnt off in firing, which makes outlining the fine detail difficult on faces for example. You cant see where you have outlined in paint and what is pencil. None of yer fine finicky model paint brushes here either!

As well as painted detail, you can scratch lines into the ceramic paint to create  the shiny white dot of well polished black boots or a line of braid, then picked out with yellow paint.

Two to three hours of design and paint, tea and cake, quickly  shoot by, so you have to restrict the complexity of your design to what can be finished in the time. This is why I kept the toy fort sketchy in outline.

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Trumpet and drum for the marching rhythm.

The whole circular parade on a plate design started with this rushing private soldier, who has either  just slipped or is rushing to catch up the others. He has earned a suitable glare from a stern looking Sergeant Major.

 

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Keep up there now! Steady on parade …

 

The toy soldier plate will eventually be framed and hung above my work desk at home as part of my toy soldier collection.

I enjoyed the experience very much. I hope one day to do another session and paint a toy soldier design on a different object such as a mug to store my paintbrushes and pencils in.

I must admit to a new found respect for the skill of painted ceramics and even transfer prints like the Cath Kidston guardsman range of mugs and everyday items https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/13/cath-kidston-guardsmen/

 

Many thanks to Clair Roberts at the Kitchen Front http://www.thekitchenfront.co.uk/creative-skill-workshops-bude/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN blog, Inglorious 12th August 2017

 

 

 

Deconstructing Trains in Tins and Boxes

train set

A post on my Sidetracked blog, comparing my delightful battery powered Train in a TIN seen in recent gaming scenarios with a similar Train in a BOX set.

There is also  some suitable sidetracking to Pound Store Plastic  Warriors and WW1 type light railways along the way:

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/deconstructing-trains-train-in-a-tin-vs-train-in-a-box/

 

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Pound store plastics, cheap plastic magazine cover toys and a deconstructed ‘train in a tin’ rolling stock.

Posted by Mark, Man of TIN blog / Sidetracked blog, 10 August 2017.

Greendale, Greendale, that’s the place for me …

 

Blowing Up Desert Trains

 

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Fighting over the railway tracks with bayonets … Peter Laing 15mm figures

 

My 15mm Peter Laing figures have been fighting a WW1 / colonial skirmish around a blocked railway bridge and halted desert train.

This has been written up on my railway and  gaming related occasional blog Sidetracked.

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/08/03/blowing-up-desert-trains-part-1/

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/08/05/blowing-up-trains-part-2/

All of this was inspired by a photo in a post on Chris Kemp’s Not Quite Mechanised website about Lawrence of Arabia and the Hejaz Railway.

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2017/07/31/charlotte-bronte-and-lawrence-of-arabia-blow-up-trains/

https://notquitemechanised.wordpress.com/2017/07/30/a-civil-day-out/

This short evening solo game, played 1 figure = 1 man, was a good chance to explore using  a larger gaming space on my larger 192 Hexes of Joy gaming board, featured in previous blogposts.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/192-hexes-of-joy-a-larger-hex-game-board/

This scenario also proved an interesting parallel to my recent Vintage Airfix ACW Railway crossing game.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/07/25/acw-battle-of-pine-ridge-vintage-airfix-full-game-write-up/

 

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My 192 Hexes Of Joy seen from above before even more pinky desert loveliness was added.

 

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN, 5 August 2017.