Toy Soldiers on a Plate

 

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The whole plate with my toy soldier  parade design

On a rainy day on a recent seaside holiday, various members of my family booked in for a ‘paint your own ceramics’ workshop for a couple of hours including tea and cake.

As the only man there that afternoon amongst assorted female holidaymakers of all ages, I declined the more  floral patterns and the seaside inspired designs to design and paint  my very own ceramic toy soldier parade on a plate.  

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Upside down soldiers the right way up …

Thinking of those wonderful Herald plastic toy soldier guardsmen or the Britain’s hollowcast lead bands and parades, the Airfix Guards Colour Party set amongst others, I sketched these figures freehand out on an unfired ceramic plate in pencil.

I wanted a 1950s / 1960s nursery tea set ceramics feel, so kept the design nice and loose.

 

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Setting a swinging pace to the plate this cheery bandleader or drum major.

What was so different from painting real toy soldiers with acrylic or enamel model paints, matt or gloss, is that ceramic paints are a different colour (almost pastel and chalky) from how they appear on ceramics when fired.

With ceramic paints you have no strong idea how the design will look when finished, other than the helpful colour range plates to look at when choosing paints. These have the final fired colour and paint name marked on, which  gives you some idea which ceramic red paint is closest to a Guardsman’s scarlet jacket for example.

The eventual fired richness of colour and coverage were not always in places (such as deep blue trousers) what I had envisaged or was used to from a model paint tin but I was still very happy with my first attempt.

Several days later, the collection and reveal of the fired plate was quite exciting, wondering –  Had it survived firing? Would it look alright?

 

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Angria Arise!  The scarlet red banner of the rising sun that I designed for the Bronte Imagi-Nation country of Angria. This makes them an Angrian Guards Regiment Band.

The original light touch pencil sketch marks are burnt off in firing, which makes outlining the fine detail difficult on faces for example. You cant see where you have outlined in paint and what is pencil. None of yer fine finicky model paint brushes here either!

As well as painted detail, you can scratch lines into the ceramic paint to create  the shiny white dot of well polished black boots or a line of braid, then picked out with yellow paint.

Two to three hours of design and paint, tea and cake, quickly  shoot by, so you have to restrict the complexity of your design to what can be finished in the time. This is why I kept the toy fort sketchy in outline.

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Trumpet and drum for the marching rhythm.

The whole circular parade on a plate design started with this rushing private soldier, who has either  just slipped or is rushing to catch up the others. He has earned a suitable glare from a stern looking Sergeant Major.

 

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Keep up there now! Steady on parade …

 

The toy soldier plate will eventually be framed and hung above my work desk at home as part of my toy soldier collection.

I enjoyed the experience very much. I hope one day to do another session and paint a toy soldier design on a different object such as a mug to store my paintbrushes and pencils in.

I must admit to a new found respect for the skill of painted ceramics and even transfer prints like the Cath Kidston guardsman range of mugs and everyday items https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/13/cath-kidston-guardsmen/

 

Many thanks to Clair Roberts at the Kitchen Front http://www.thekitchenfront.co.uk/creative-skill-workshops-bude/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN blog, Inglorious 12th August 2017

 

 

 

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

6 thoughts on “Toy Soldiers on a Plate”

  1. This is great! You’ve done a terrific job in a short space of time. I’ve been to a ‘paint a pot’ experience with my daughter. When there, I find myself resisting the urge to take over with the brush and become a perfectionist by touching up her artwork. The next time we ‘paint a pot’, you’ve inspired me try something similar.

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  2. Lovely looking plate. I think it is splendid. Why not do yourself a mug too?
    By the way I have been enjoying your recent posts- always something interesting and inspiring!

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    1. Thanks Alan. I did think of doing a mug but they were running a bit short of blank mugs that day. I thought a plate might be a bit easier / flatter first time round. I also thought of doing a plate as I already have some great Cath Kidston Guardsman / Guardsman and Friends big manly mugs with the new Marching Band design one on the way. I may make a mug next time though in this Guardsman style.

      Maybe this painted ceramics is another competition one day for your crafty household, after the biscuit house success?

      Thanks for your comments on the blog. I am still enjoying the blogging and I am also working through your many years of inspiring blog too.
      Many best wishes, Mark Man of TIN.

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