How Heroscape Hexes Measure Up

 

IMG_2080
Eight of these big 24 Heroscape Hex baseplates make up my fixed 192 Hexes of Joy game board.

 

As I mentioned in my reply to a blog comment by David Bradley,  I completely forgot to put the measurements on the blog post about my 192 Hexes of Joy game board.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/192-hexes-of-joy-a-larger-hex-game-board/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/08/03/192-hexes-of-joy-affronted-by-re-basing-and-ground-scales/

This is partly because the game board  was a “take it as found”, scrounged before skipped notice board, rather than a purchased or commercial notice board as I think Bob Cordery used. Bob may have put his board dimensions on his post.

Recent Heroscape hex-periment blogposts

I have been intrigued and  quite curious to see how Bob Cordery will incorporate these into his Portable Wargame set up. I enjoyed his stylish and smart coastlines, well worth looking at these on his blog:

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/messing-about-with-my-heroscape-terrain.html

Certainly a good miniature match for his Hexon coasts:

http://bobscolonialwargaming.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/clearing-nest-of-sea-rats.html

along with Bob’s experiments in painting or not painting, flocking or not flocking.

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/to-paint-andor-flock-or-not-to-paint.html

and Bob’s trial of which shade of green is best for your Heroscape hex gameboard.  http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/some-more-not-quite-forty-shades-of.html

I know that John Patriquin the Wargame Hermit blogger in the USA also uses a board of Heroscape hexes, all sprayed uniform green http://wargamehermit.blogspot.co.uk/2017/01/two-experimental-wargames.html

Hex-bashing

The Heroscape hexes are versatile enough that you can flock them, paint them or plant a tree on them.

IMG_2187
Standard desert hexes (centre) alongside my painted “desert pinky” grey hexes (left),  flocked sand and green hexes and impassable forest tree Heroscape hex experiments. I shall have to try palm trees next! 

The Heroscapers gallery section  on terrain https://www.heroscapers.com/ has some interesting ways of building walls, hedges, fences and walls of buildings around the outside of the hexes so that you  can place figures inside. Something to try perhaps for a French-Indian War or Civil War stockade fort section.

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A single Heroscape hex at 4/4.5 cm across shown with 2 bashed old Peter Laing WW2 British infantrymen – a single hex can fit 4  15mm Peter Laing or 20mm Airfix bases comfortably enough.

 

Bob Cordery measures Heroscape hex tiles at about 4cm across, but add the locking bits and I reckon that this is almost 4.5cms.

 

IMG_2098
‘Snowflake’ Seven Heroscape hex piece with 15mm Peter Laing artillery.

 

So the ‘seven hex’ almost snowflake pattern plates in my recent post about Peter Laing and Base Overhang are about 13.5 / 14 cms across at their three hex widest point on any side.

Heroscape Hexes also come in ones, twos, threes, snowflake sevens and 24s giving a variety of possible 3D or 2D shaped terrains.

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Twin or double hex pieces and triple hex pieces in the range of standard Heroscape colours of green, sand and grey stone. 

The eight large plates of 24 Hexes (which that fit onto my board to make the 192 hexes of Joy) are the standard Heroscape large base plate. These are about 6 Hexes wide or for each plate 24 cms at widest, 6 hexes long about 27 cms longest edge. 2 of these combine however to make a rough rectangle of only 38 cms long, as seen making up a quarter each of my hex base board (above top).

 

IMG_2090
192 Hexes of desert joy in 3D mode from my recent Blowing up Desert Trains scenario. 

My big 192 Hex board (an old possibly handmade but disused noticeboard) is around 79/80 cms long and 54/55 cms wide. This includes 2cms of trim at each end – effectively the trim and painted wooden gap round the edge are about 3-4cms wide, almost one hex wide.

My smaller portable game boards are two wooden box lids of 54 Hexes each. These are used as bought / found, being no carpenter, bring 40cms long, 30 cms wide including 1cm lip (3cms deep) around each side. There is some wasted space around the hex edge to box lip which I infill with AstroTurf strips for rough grass scrub. Together they make up a board of 108 Hexes, good for small fast games.

Together they would make up 300 Hexes of Joy!

IMG_0368
My recent ACW railway bridge crossing scenario based on my two portable game boards in box lids – 54 hexes each.

 

I have yet to put all three hex boards alongside each other, mainly as I don’t yet have a table quite big enough. I have no games room so the smaller boards have the advantage that they can be lifted off a table and put on a shelf if things like meals claim the table. The bigger board after gaming when stripped back to the 8 interlocking big hex base plates can be stowed away easily enough or even hung on the wall as modern art.

Heroscape tiles by Hasbro / MB are currently long out of production but the starter Master Sets are fairly cheaply available on UK eBay (usually the first Master Set called Rise of the Valkyries) and with more variety on American eBay including the Superhero variants.

On Amazon pricing is bizarre – complete Heroscape new starter sets and sequels are in the £200 to £300 plus region!

However on EBay you currently pay anything from £20 for just the completist set of hex tiles through to £50-60 for a used slightly bashed starter set; Some people split sets and sell components. Beware that you can pay a lot of money on some sites for individual specialist tiles, trees, mountain sections etc. More about these sets and web links on

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/heroscape-duelling-in-the-garden/

These master starter sets contain 85 interlocking tile sections, made up of:
8 x 24 tiles, enough for the base of my board of 192 Hexes of Joy!
and then the interesting extras that give the 3D-ness:

image
15mm Peter Laing priest and his flock on a single hex, flocked preaching mound next to the abbey remains (Heroscape ruin) 

2 ruin corners, which need a bit of work like upper floors to make them useful
10 x triple hexes (like a triangle),
10 ‘snowflake’ seven Hexes,
10 double hexes,
26 single hexes
21 fairly flimsy thin blue water tiles.
These hexes are in a variety of colours:  sand, grey rock, green grass.

Oh and 30 bizarre painted fantasy figures (see previous blogposts) https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/heroscape-duelling-figures/

Further ideas or alternatives 

Lots of terrain and hex modification ideas at the gallery at the Heroscapers.com fan forum https://www.heroscapers.com/community/gallery/browseimages.php?do=browseimages&c=9

I have never bought the Hexon 10cm hex system that many other gamers like Bob Cordery also use for their games. I get the feeling from other blogs that it is quite expensive but you may prefer the look, size and flexibility. Each to their happy own!

I generally want smaller hexes in a smaller cluttered playing area for skirmish games like Donald Featherstone’s ‘Close Wars’ (appendix to his 1962 book Wargames) so the 4/4.5 cm hexes suit me from 15mm and 20mm through to 40mm figures. It might even stretch to 54mm figures on the usual 2p bases for very small skirmishes or duels.

The Hexon website for those who want to check these out is:  https://www.kallistra.co.uk/index.php?page=37#anchor262386

Wishing you joy of your hex, whatever size.

Blogposted by  Mark, Man of TIN blog, 16 August 2017

 

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

2 thoughts on “How Heroscape Hexes Measure Up”

  1. MJT
    There are only two ruins in the starter Master Set (which need to have larger floors put in) but there were available in other sets extra rocky peaks, trees that fit in Hexes etc and that you can still buy individually secondhand through some dealer sites.
    There are some good small building design on the hex ideas in 100s of pages of the converted terrain and figures gallery on Heroscapers.com. Lots of fantasy or fantastic figure conversions too.
    The Heroscape figures are a indeed bit odd, they are my only fantasy figures, but they are painted and good for knockabout family games.
    Mark, Man of TIN

    Like

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