My Pound Store Naval Convoy

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My convoy of Merchant Shipping
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The Wolf Pack

It might be stretching it a bit to call Flying Tiger a pound store, although these two packs of eraser ships cost £4 in total.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/08/09/hms-flying-tiger-eraser-battleship

It’s come quite a way since picking up these in Flying Tiger a few weeks ago.

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Two stubby cruise ships joined together to make a hospital or troop ship maybe? 

I now look forward this autumn to working out some kind of (solo) convoy gaming simulation, once I have puzzled  out what to do for escorts. I might have to raid the card ships from our old family copy of the Dover Patrol game for now.

Thanks to many of you for all the excellent suggestions regarding simple naval wargames rules. I have now ordered a paperback copy from Lulu of the Bob Cordery’s new Gridded Naval Wargames which received most recommendations, as well as a £2 bashed up, ex-library copy of Donald Featherstone’s Naval Wargames.

If these rules don’t suit an old infantry skirmish gamer, there were other helpful suggestions. Thank you all.

It will be interesting moving out into new territory or terrain, a whole new language of ships and naval warfare, a world or ocean apart from H. G. Wells type Little Wars or the small infantry skirmish game of Featherstone’s Close Wars.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/08/15/dipping-my-little-toe-in-the-big-ocean-of-naval-wargaming

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What next for my Merchant Shipping Convoy? 

Two tone grey camouflage makes it difficult to identify individual ships, which is the point of the dark grey lower and light grey upper sections. However it makes identifying individual cargo ships in any future naval game a problem, so a few pre-war coloured funnels might return as they did in WW2.

Paints used are several coats of Revell Aquacolor Acrylics, Gunship Grey and Stone Grey for the ships and  painting separate layers of Ultramarine Blue and Mossy Green onto the black card bases made from scrap art framing or mounting card. What colour the sea?

Big ships don’t leave such a wide angle wake as a small river craft. Getting some kind of bow wave and wake was more tricky, a blob of off-white paint on the bow brushed along the side of the ship and its aftermath seemed to do the trick in most cases.

I also have to name and label my convoy ships, probably with some Bronte inspired Angria, Gondal and Gaaldine names: Angrian Princess, Gondal Queen, that sort of thing that suits possible  Imagi-Nation naval campaigns.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 19 August 2018

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

6 thoughts on “My Pound Store Naval Convoy”

    1. If these ships become Post 1917 Merchant or Royal Navy then dazzle it shall be.

      Any WW2 escorts will have Naval camouflage, yet finding out colour schemes for WW2 Merchant Ships has proved much harder. Dark grey hull, lighter grey superstructure seems to have been the norm.

      Liked by 1 person

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