Eyewitness to the Battle of Langensalza 1866 Austro Prussian War

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Illustration by Frank Gillett.
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Strand Magazine December 1913 (www. archive.org)

A curious little eyewitness snippet about the Austro-Prussian War 1866 from the Strand Magazine 1913.

https://archive.org/stream/TheStrandMagazineAnIllustratedMonthly/TheStrandMagazine1913bVol.XlviJul-dec#page/n770/mode/1up

Herbert Beerbohm Tree (1852-1917) grew up to become a famous Victorian and Edwardian actor and theatre manager, founding RADA. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Beerbohm_Tree

The Battle that Herbert saw forming as a fourteen year old boy was part of the Austrian-Prussian War or Seven Weeks War of 1866.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Langensalza_(1866)

The Battle of Langensalza was fought on 27 June 1866 near Bad Langensalza in what is now modern Germany, between the Kingdom of Hanover (Hanoverians) and the Prussians. The Hanoverians won the battle but were then surrounded by a larger and reinforced Prussian army, and, unable to link up with their Bavarian allies to the south, they surrendered. This marked the demise of the Hanoverian Army and the annexation of Hanover into the burgeoning kingdom of Prussia as it systematically unified Germany into the modern nation state. …

Another long lasting result of the Battle of Langensalza is the use of the “Red Cross” by medical personnel. Created by the First Geneva Convention in 1864, the Red Cross began an international humanitarian aid group. This organization, which would later greatly expand in size, was originally very small. Involving just thirty trained volunteer nurses from Gotha, the first actual combat mission of the Red Cross occurred on the Prussian side at Langensalza. (Wikipedia source)

I hope Herbert Beerbohm Tree’s account is of interest to this who are interested in the Austro-Prussian War.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 8th January 2019

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

4 thoughts on “Eyewitness to the Battle of Langensalza 1866 Austro Prussian War”

  1. Most interesting post. I really liked the style of the Strand magazine and its accompanying illustration. Would that there were more magazines thus still produced.

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    1. I have a couple of random Strand volumes from the 1890s and 1911, including Wells’ Floor Games Article that I mentioned in the comments here on a Tiny Tin Men: https://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/2019/01/review-for-floor-games.html
      Looking through the online Strand archive at archive.org to see if any readers did follow up the Strand editors suggestion to send in photographs of their floor games (none obvious in 1912 or 1913 volumes online), I came across this interesting Herbert Beerbohm Tree article about the APW. Worth a read through over time
      the 20 to 30 years worth of these Strand Magazine volumes online including lots of stirring stories, lots of turgid serials and plentiful Conan Doyle. Few magazines like it now, it was a kind of a People’s Friend meets National Geographic sort of thing.

      Like

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