Russo Turkish War 1877 Movie Clips

Without knowing the historical  background and no translation, this movie  becomes a very good stand-in for any 19th century  Imagi-Nations you may have.

Amphibious landings, cliff scaling, flag kissing, bugles and drums …

Lots of marching around, impressive uniforms, stirring soundtrack and Soviet era uplifted face shots for added heroism.

very imPart 3 ends with a Soviet tank parade as a memorial or anniversary is marked.

The historic background of Russo Turkish War in 1877 is set out briefly here in three minutes.

Without knowing the background, this could all be something straight out of Branwell Bronte’s head and the family Imagi-Nations of Gandalf, Angria nod Glasstown.

This post was inspired by Ross MacFarlane at Battle Game of The Month blog  https://gameofmonth.blogspot.com/2018/12/meanwhile-for-your-19thc-centraleastern.html

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN 11 January 2019

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

6 thoughts on “Russo Turkish War 1877 Movie Clips”

    1. I was looking at this and thinking much the same, Kepis = Airfix American Civil War Union Infantry.
      Without wishing to start converting to the RussoTurkish War, keeping it generic, the unfamiliarity of the period / battles and the lack of subtitles makes it useful for Imagi-Nations scenarios and colour schemes.
      Spotted a couple of female soldiers in the line ups as well.

      Like

  1. Can’t tell you how much I enjoyed those videos. Never seen them before. The scene where they cross the Danube under fire was great.

    Strelets do a whole range of different 1877 Russo-Turkish War troops and I painted a lot of them before my blog started up on WordPress. Still got loads to turn my attention back to at some point. They released some 1877 Bashi-Bazouks (Turkish auxillaries) very recently. I particularly like their Russian and Ottoman winter troops, some of whom made an appearance in my Christmas story recently. I recognised some of the Strelets figures in these films; the Russian infantry and the Turkish artillery, for example and the Romanian troops which were expected to be released by Strelets but never saw the light of day for some reason.

    http://www.strelets-r.com/Pages/Campaign.aspx?CamID=11

    During this war, disgraced Victorian general Valentine Baker found some redemption (though not with Queen Victoria) when he masterminded an utterly brilliant rearguard action for the Turks at Tashkessen in 1877 which I read about last year.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/guest-bloggers/valentine-bakers-last-stand-tashkessen.html

    Finally, with FEMbruary looming, did you notice the two female soldiers appearing at 2:52 and 3:09 on Part 3?

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the film clips. Dramatic clips indeed. Spotted the two female soldiers and screenshotted them for FEMbruary. Why would they have been there?
      Rumanians could be converted from suitable kepi French or ACW union troops.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hard to say, but I think that the female troops might not be from the 1877 era but, as the director segues and mixes the footage into WWII, they therefore might be soviet-era troops maybe?

        Like

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