Combat Mission Military Soldier Playsets

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Cross posted from my other plastic, budget-conscious gaming blog, Pound Store Plastic Warriors, here is some simple and cheap playset therapy:

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/combat-mission-military-soldier-play-set/

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2019/01/22/combat-mission-soldier-play-set-2/

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 Man of TIN salutes the contents of  this Combat Mission Soldier Set – apologies for the slightly fuzzy screenshot of Playset 2. How could so much fun pack into so small a box? (Redcoated  Man of TIN not included).

With the usual budget playset ‘hallmark’ of a  bizarre mix of scales and periods,  there are some useful 45mm to 50mm figures and accessories for gaming. Who could want for more?

Crossposted by Mark, Man of TIN blog, 23 January 2019.

 

2 thoughts on “Combat Mission Military Soldier Playsets”

  1. Now there’s some poses and accessories I’ve never seen before! Interesting stuff. I had about 300 green army men as a kid; rolled marbles at them as a method of “fighting”. Ones that fell on their stomach were dead and removed, those that fell on their back were wounded and could be stood back up next turn. I did bring some on camping trips for the terrain bonus, but sadly they were all gone by the time I discovered “Return of the Twelves.” Sad to say I never characterized them or sent them on expeditions and adventures like the Brontes.

    One game I’ve been itching to try would have to use Army Man-scale tanks, because the players have to physically manipulate them. It looks awesome and I play with a group that might be willing to try it and have the terrain and space necessary.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20160309103658/http://jimwallman.org.uk/wargame/tankduel.htm

    Basically, each side has a team of players, a tank, and an identical terrain setup, which they are viewing from opposite directions with a curtain between. They sit at the table in the relative positions of a tank crew.

    Only the driver may move the tank.
    Only the commander may decide where to go.
    Only the loader may fetch ammunition.
    Only the gunner may turn the turret.

    All this is actually done, with the hands. Once the tanks spot each other, a referee places duplicate tanks on each table. The players have a set time to play through their turn, and if they get in each other’s way, well, that’s what happens in a tank. If the gunner doesn’t make it back to the table and announce “loaded!” before the gunner reports “Firing,” then the loader’s arm is off. And if a tank is hit, the referee says, “clang!” and the players of the struck tank literally have five seconds to get out of the room before the tank explodes and anyone still in the room dies.

    It sounds utterly hilarious. But also an interesting way to demonstrate how a tank crew had to work together.

    All I need is four tanks (in two colors) and two half-table sets of identical terrain…

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    1. The green Army Men game memories are a rich treasure trove or touchstone of the adventures of what we all try to get back to.

      Interesting idea for tank games. I have met a few tankies and it sounded / sounds cramped, horrendous and scarily vulnerable. This Jim Wallman tank duel looks like the kind of experimental (team) games that Wargames Development people (who publish the Nugget) play at their yearly weekend conference. It also looks like an excellent simulation game for a Tank Museum.
      There are lots of people playing the new What a Tanker! By Too Fat Lardies (but I have not bought or played these yet).
      Pound store plastic tanks of indeterminate type are “cheap as chips” in playsets.

      I have placed (mentioning your library gaming interests) an old 2001 TES article on line on Pound Store Plastic Warriors about the fantasy games, literacy and libraries in Britain. Mostly seems Games Workshop based. Hope it is useful.

      Like

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