WW1 Doughboys 1919 in the Russian Civil War

Day 2 of our random Man of TIN gaming Advent Calendar: what is behind today’s window?

An interesting snowy story from earlier in the year on its 100th anniversary:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/forgotten-doughboys-who-died-fighting-russian-civil-war-180971470/

American Doughboys versus Bolshevik Russians – this sounds an interesting piece of history to explore through game scenario, if you have suitable WW1 era troops in greatcoats. Doctor Zhivago stuff, this!

The Smithsonian article is partly based on this book:

Image source: Library of Congress

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN on 2 December 2019

Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

2 thoughts on “WW1 Doughboys 1919 in the Russian Civil War”

  1. Crying out for a game using Airfix ww1 Americans v 1/72 plastic Russians of that period which I imagine are relatively available. Most interesting post.

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    1. It looks an interesting post / book. British troops were also stationed / tasked briefly to Archangel / Russia in support of White Russia. This may be one of the reasons why the Great War is often oddly cited on memorials as 1914 to 1919, along with with the occupation of Germany / the Rhineland after the war.

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