Peter Laing 15mm Union Infantry OBEs Rebased and Flocked

The finished article, flocked and rebased …

A happy discovery as I sorted and restowed boxes yesterday, I found I had an overlooked small unit of Peter Laing 15mm American Civil War Union infantry that I had bought online already painted and based in threes some years ago.

In their painting at least, these in Bob Cordery’s words are OBEs – Other Beggars’ Efforts.

Peter Laing catalogue reprint.

I found tucked away in a small box 33 painted figures of ACW Infantry advancing with rifle (Kepi) F3009 of the small ACW range from the now discontinued ‘out of production’ Peter Laing 15mm range.

As they were when I found them, well based in threes, and painted in union blue, mostly with black kepis.

When I discovered them, they were based in threes, which is no use to me as I fight individual figure skirmish games. So the often tedious process of F and B (Flocking and Basing) or in this case, Rebasing and Flocking began yesterday.

Once split off their triple bases, I tried to keep as much of the original figure flocking as I could. Something of their OBE original basing would remain. I glued each figure to a 15mm by 15mm base of scrap mounting board, then used PVA glue and railway flock to cover the gaps.

Once the figures have their base gaps covered in PVA, they were gently plunged into the layers of mixed railway flock in the pink box and left for a while.

Finished and in formation …

I was short of a unit officer, so a previous paint conversion of an A503 Gunner with handspike from the Peter Laing ECW range stepped in to lead them temporarily.

More of my Peter Laing ACW figures can be seen in action here in 2016 in an action in the Hicksville River Valley: https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/21/peter-laing-american-civil-war-skirmish/

Late in the evening after rebasing I spent some time catching up with the fascinating old and mostly decaying American buildings on the Forgotten Georgia blog

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/07/04/dutchy-and-dade-the-confederate-history-of-forgotten-georgia/

WordPress tell me that this is my 500th Blogpost on Man of TIN blog since it began in 2016. Thank you for reading!

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN, 5 April 2020

B.P.S. Blog Post Script

As this is a “hands-on, brain off” type of activity, which is calming enough in itself, I found some suitable period music free on a YouTube or Spotify playlist to listen to. Instrumental versions of Songs of the North by Craig Duncan (and its twin recording Songs of the South) kept me company.

I’m not sure what you might listen to whilst painting and basing, but I’m sure the tiny men appreciate it and it is somehow absorbed into their tiny tin DNA during the painting and basing, giving them entertainment and fighting spirit. Enjoy!

https://youtu.be/iL-wAKzqysg

Peter Laing Pity Party

“Middle Eastern Swordsmen for Hire … will go anywhere … do anything … any period … please somebody buy us and paint us and base us.” I wonder if that’s what  goes through the lead head thoughts of some of these unloved figures.

These Peter Laings have been sitting online on EBay for so long, that eventually I started to feel sorry for the tiny 15mm chaps.

Every time I went online to look for Peter Laing figures, these unloved and unwanted specimens would turn up.

Peter Laing Ancients seem on the whole less desirable than  his later period figures ranges.

I didn’t have a “mounted Camel spearman”. Everybody needs at least one …

It was said by Phil Barker of the Peter Laing figure range  “Horses sometimes a little strange”  and by another (John G Robertson?) that his armoured  elephants looked like terrible angry mice. Pictured here. However his camels have a certain camelid charm.

EBay retailer figures4sale listed the others  as “M207 Turkish Horse Archer and M410 Hun cavalry” and the rather genetic “Middle eastern swordsmen x 5”. I have yet to check them in the catalogue. Maybe some of the MeWe Peter Laing community will beat me to it

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 25 January 2020

A Peter Laing pity party … tinier than the curious  Puddles Pity Party at the Postmodern Jukebox HQ. Slowed down cabaret American punk – like an armoured camel, just what everyone secretly needs.

 

 

 

2020 Man of TIN New Gaming Year’s Irresolutions

NGY 2020 Irresolution One – Carry on Converting

Sadly I discovered that Carry on Converting, Carry on Gaming and Carry on Painting are not a trio of 1960s British comedy movies with Barbara Windsor and Kenneth Williams. Not to mention Carry on Basing and Carry On Flocking …

Paint conversions, figure conversions from Pound Store plastic figures and old Airfix through to repairing old 54mm lead figures – more needed in 2020!

Airfix Confederates or Angrian Bronte ImagiNations militia?

Saxby Bridge, Navvy Battles and Civil Unrest as small skirmish scenarios

NGY 2020 Irresolution Two – More solo short small skirmish games

Including 15mm Peter Laing, Airfix 20mm up to 54mm figures across a range of periods including Romans, Bronte ImagiNations etc. using simple Featherstone inspired rules.

NGY 2020 Irresolution Three – Paint More Peter Laings

I should be putting more content of painted figures and gaming with Peter Laing figures on the MeWe Peter Laing community forum

and

NGY 2020 Irresolution Four – Full Metal Hic Jacet

15mm Peter Laing Romans vs Picts and Ancients ‘Small Skirmish’ games. I’m fairly new to Ancients, if you don’t count Airfix Romans and Britons:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/full-metal-hic-jacet/

It is Rosemary Sutcliff’s centenary in December 2020, Eagle of the Ninth was one of my favourite childhood books. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/07/16/rosemary-sutcliff-birth-centenary-december-2020/

NGY 2020 Irresolution Five – Return to Planet Back Yarden

I seemed to spend all year on and off enjoyably preparing for a 42mm or 54mm garden skirmish game with plastics or old lead that never properly happened. Sci-Fi Space Wars, American Civil War, ImagiNations and colonial Little Wars or WW2 – who knows which period will make it into the flower bed battles? I foresee creaky knees and an aching back …

NGY 2020 Irresolution Six – Develop my Scouting Wide Games for the Tabletop

Developing my Scouting Wide Games for the Tabletop games and rules on my sister blog site including snowball fights rules and preparing for the Little Wars Revisited Woking 54mm Little Wars Saturday 14th March 2020.

NGY 2020 Irresolution Seven – Develop my Bronte inspired ImagiNations in 19th and 20th Century

2020 is another of the Bronte200 anniversaries https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/gaming-the-bronte-family-imaginations-of-glasstown-angria-gondal-and-gaaldine/

Simple Airfix joy – I was so happily sidetracked by Tony’s gift …

 

How did the 2019 New Gaming Years Irresolutions go?

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/01/01/new-gaming-year-irresolutions-2019/

I succeeded in a few (very few) of my vague irresolute hobby targets. 2019 The year just gone seems to have gone very quickly.

February or #FEMbruary 2019 saw the believable female miniature painting of modelling challenge with my Bad Squiddo 28mm Land Girls entered into my local spring flower show. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/03/17/huzzah-for-boycraft-flower-show-craft-success/

‘Scouting’ happened along in April, when I picked up a copy of a vintage Wide Games book on a seaside holiday, which set me (and also Alan at the Duchy of Tradgardland) off on a new tangent.

In summer, the kind gift of a bag of old 1960s Airfix figures by Tony Adams at the Miniature Wood Screw Army led to some nice relaxed painting and rebasing of Airfix figures. This often feels quite relaxing to be like happy colouring in.

Who knows where my “gaming journey” will have taken me at the end of 2020 and by the end of the Twenty Twenties?

If it’s as fun as where it’s has taken me since 2010, I will be happy enough!

Moddelling and gaming and the company they bring (odd for a largely solitary prepping hobby) are good for your mental health. Just ask Models for Heroes

Here’s best wishes for the tabletop gaming year to come to all my blog readers, to all those whose blogs I enjoy reading and for all those online strangers that I have not met yet who stumble across my Man of TIN blog and my other blogs this year.

Happy New Year! Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN on 31 December 2019 / 1 January 2020.

Wheel Meet Again: A Tribute Ancients Game for Stuart Asquith

Tomorrow / today the 18th November is the day of Stuart Asquith’s funeral.

I know that several of Stuarts’s long term gaming friends and magazine colleagues and contemporaries will attend.

I hope the many online tributes and the tribute games played this weekend in his memory will be of great comfort to his family.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/11/17/preparing-an-ancients-game-in-tribute-to-stuart-asquith/

Aerial view of the skirmish area set out as in the Solo Wargaming book. Turn 1

.

My tribute to Stuart, using some of his former 15mm Peter Laing troops, is a small Ancient skirmish.

It is based on the ‘Wheel Meet Again’ scenario in his Guide To Solo Wargaming. The rules are based on his simple rules in his Guide to Wargaming.

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Scenario 8 – Wheel Meet Again

“A lightly guarded convoy of wagons has run into a spot of bother. One of the wagons has suffered a broken wheel and had to be left behind with a guard by the rest of the convoy. On reaching their destination the scouts pass on their news about the disabled wagon. At once a relief column is organised, complete with spare wheel to put the wagon back in service and sets off.

Meanwhile the enemy is also interested in the immobile wagon and its small escort and decide to investigate. The wagon guard, on the alert for just such an event, open fire on the inquisitive enemy, hoping that relief is at hand.

This scenario is fought in three stages. Firstly the wagon guards attempt to keep their attackers at bay. Next reinforcements arrive and deploy to allow the wagon to be repaired. Finally the wagon and its new escort have to gain the safety of the eastern edge of the table once more. A moderately complex, three-part engagement follows and offers numerous permutations for the solo player …”

Stuart Asquith, p.74 Solo Wargaming (1989)

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I am not normally an Ancients player but having picked up several years ago a 15mm Pict / Celtic and Roman army from Stuart Asquith and also other figures from online sellers, I have enough scraps of Egyptians, Greeks, Assyrians etc to field several different national skirmish forces.

The setting: Roman Britain – the Pictish wilds

A Roman supply column has left behind a broken down wagon with a few escorts, promising to send a relief force.

A small shadowing hunting party of Pictish scouts lurk to the Northwest.

The broken wagon is a fire cart, a blacksmiths cart, belonging to the Roman Army.

Stuart recommends a small ‘Wagon Guard’ force for part one, such as 6 archers (or musketeers in later periods).

A d6 is thrown to find out when reinforcements on both sides will arrive. In this game they would appear on Turn 5, Romans to the East and Picts to the West.

After playing the game I noticed that Stuart Asquith suggested that one d6 is thrown to work out which turn for the arrival of the enemy, two d6 for the arrival of the supply column.

There are several areas of uncrossable forest to the Southeast and Southwest and a passable rocky forest outcrop to the North East.

It takes two turns to fix the wagon once the Roman forces reach this waggon with the repair tools and a spare wheel. Repairs take the help of four men.

Phase 1 – Holding the Pictish Scouting Party at Bay

Turn 1 sees the Roman armoured archers spread out into a defensive circle, the Pictish scouting party spread out to the Northwest. The Roman archers land two successful hits at mid range and hit the two Pictish archers.

Without distance or range weapons, the Picts charge into melee – one Roman archer is killed and two more Pictish spearman.

In some melee situations, the +1 advantage of the armour of a Roman archers is cancelled out by being confronted by two Pictish spearmen +1.

Roman archers fought the melee with their swords, so are unable to fire this round.

Turn 3

With few Pict scouts left, we take a morale test to work out what the Picts will do. Roll d6 – 1,3, 5 continue for melee and 2,4,6 outnumbered, retreat. The Picts move into melee and being within firing range, the last Picts are quickly wiped out.

Turn 4 sees the Roman Archers regroup.

Phase 2 the Relief Column Arrives

Turn 5

The Pictish War Band and Roman relief column arrived on the scene at opposite ends. The Light Cavalry and Light Infantry head out ahead of the others. Roman archers take out a Pictish light cavalryman and archer. The Pictish archers miss their targets.

Turn 6

The Roman light infantry and cavalry ride up with the mounted office of the relief column to join the Roman archer Wagon Guards who fall back behind the wagon to join them.

In the ensuing movement / melee and fire turns, 2 more Pictish archers are successfully targeted by the Roman archers but the Roman mounted officer is killed by a Pictish archer.

Turn 7

Romans move first and the legionaries in the relief column reach the stranded waggon – the light infantry and cavalry on both sides clash in melee. Two Roman cavalry and two auxiliaries are quickly killed.

At this stage the Picts have a series of lucky dice throws, spelling disaster for the Romans. They slam into the Roman ranks, killing the last 4 Roman archers of the Wagon Guard.

The Romans are unable to fire their pilum short spears as their own men are out in front. Fortunately the Pictish archers are equally blocked from firing by the presence of their own men.

In the melee the Roman Eagle standard bearer and another infantry officer is killed. However the Eagle is quickly grabbed by another legionary.

As soon as the Romans can throw their pilums, six Pictish warriors are brought down.

Rule – only the first two rows can throw pilums.

Turn 8

In turn 8 the two front Roman ranks who have thrown pilums spread out to counter the Picts to their right. 6 more legionaries are lost in melee before the remaining pilums are thrown taking out three more Pictish archers and spearmen.

Turn 9

As the Picts move into further melee, 2 more legionaries fall – the Eagle is again grabbed to safety by the Roman officer – and 4 Picts are killed. Only one of the Pictish archers is left.

Turn 10

On the Pictish side, only one archer, a spearman and the mounted Pictish officer and one of foot remain.

On the Roman side, 4 legionaries, the trumpeter and officer with the Eagle remain.

The morale test – throw d6 1,3,5 to retire and 2,4,6 to fight on.

The Picts choose to retire, the Romans to fight on.

Phase 3 – The Wagon repaired and rescued

The Picts retreat and the Roman legionaries repair and recover the wagon, heading off to the East, wary of further Pictish attack.

A beer tribute to Stuart Asquith who watched over the whole proceedings.

Once the game was over, I raised a glass of WW1 anniversary beer to Stuart in thanks for all he had done for my hobby.

Sadly my last bottle of this 2014 WW1 anniversary Cornish vintage beer picked up on my travels hadn’t aged well in the bottle. I had picked up a couple of beer mats for figure basing from the pub after Sunday lunch after an earlier walk – appropriately drinking some Tribute beer.

Rest In Peace, Stuart Asquith – hope you enjoyed the game.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN on 17 / 18 November 2019.

B.P.S.Blog Post Script – 18 November 2019,

Henry Hyde’s

https://battlegames.co.uk/a-eulogy-for-stuart-asquith/

Appendix – Amending Stuart Asquith’s Ancients Rules

I reduced the movement scales and weapons ranges down from Stuart’s simple rules for 15mm scale:

Spears (such as pilum) 4 inch range.

Bows 12 inch range

Weapon ranges –

Close range up to 4 inches, throw d6 4,5 or 6 for a kill.

Medium range 4 to 8 inches, throw d6 5 or 6 for a kill.

Long Range 8 to 12 inches, throw d6 6 for a kill.

Movement rates

Light Infantry 6 inches – Roman Auxiliaries and Picts Celtic warriors

Heavy Infantry 4 inches e.g. Roman legionaries and Archers

Heavy Chariot / Ox Cart 6 inches

Light Cavalry 9 inches

Melee rules

Individual melee, throw a d6 for each man involved, highest number wins. If there is two versus one man, add +1 for each attacker.

Mounted versus foot, +1 for mounted.

Fighting troops with shield or armour, -1 for attackers.

Unarmoured troops, -1 from their dice.

Preparing an Ancients Game in Tribute to Stuart Asquith

My Solo Opponent for the weekend? Stuart Asquith in his 1988 Guide to Solo Gaming.

I was saddened by the news about Stuart Asquith’s death, whose funeral is on Monday the 18th of November. It has been good to read the many tributes to him by his gaming friends and readers, as his family have also publicly said.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/11/05/a-muffled-drum-for-stuart-asquith/

Along with many other gamers worldwide, I will be holding a small tribute game in Stuart’s memory. It will be a solo Ancients Skirmish game for this coming weekend. This will be using some of my 15mm Peter Laing Ancient Roman and Picts / Celts that used to belong to Stuart.

Here is my excellent research material:

Some Ancient inspiration …

Stuart Asquith’s Military Modelling Guide To Wargaming – Ancients page
Simple rules for the Ancients from Stuart’s book with option for individual melee
Tradgardmastre Alan Gruber recommends the Phil Barker WRG titles

One of these excellent books mentioned by Stuart is literally top of my list of Ancients research, Nils Saxtorph’s Warriors and Weapons of Early Times (Blandford Colour). Many of my childhood drawings were based on this book. Like the Asquith titles, my copy of this wonderful colour book came from my local childhood branch library when they started inexplicably selling off ‘old’ books in the 1990s (!) That was back in the days of reading Stuart Asquith in Military Modelling.

Some of Stuart’s books and his Peter Laing figures feature in my Full Metal Hic Jacet project ‘research’ pile: https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/full-metal-hic-jacet/

Choosing just one suitable small scale Skirmish scenario has been a challenge from the many ones in his Solo Wargaming book. One that I have looked forward to playing again is the ‘Stranded Wagon’ scenario 8, Wheel Meet Again, adaptable to almost any period from stranded oxcart of early times and Wild West waggon to broken down supply lorry or futuristic (but broken) cargo speeder.

This is the broken down ox waggon, almost straight out of Asterix!

When is the rescue party going to arrive?

Will the escort hold out long enough?

Can wheel repairs be done in time under the threat of attack?

Stuart’s stranded waggon scenario in his Guide to Solo Wargaming

I had one recent go at this scenario theme in my Bronte inspired Angrian Imagi-Nation skirmish https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/a-skirmish-in-angria-close-little-wars-rules/

My Angrian waggon Skirmish scenario – Bronte ImagiNations

Before I play out this Solo scenario at the weekend or on the evening of the day that he is put to rest on the 18th November, I need to slightly undo some of Stuart’s handiwork to turn these figures back to single basing.

Original Asquith beermat bases – proof that he followed his own book advice!

I’m sure Stuart would be pragmatic about my adapting his multi figure basing to single figures. Stuart’s basing tips from his Guide to Wargaming are shown above, including beer mats that Stuart has used here.

Single basing using Stuart’s original beermat bases cut in two or three
A small Roman Column, some to escort the stranded ox waggon, some to repair and rescue it.

Beer mats aside, some Beer may need to be opened and drunk in Stuart’s memory as well, on or close to the 18th November in spirit alongside my fellow gamers and admirers of Stuart’s many books.

I also want to fit in a 54mm game skirmish in Stuart’s memory soon, an unfashionable scale that he supported.

I shall post pictures afterwards.

The Click2Comic treatment of Stuart Asquith, Solo gamer!

And finally … my Peter Laing 15mm Ancient British Chariot Squadron which will probably not be appearing in this “Wheel Meet Again” Stuart Asquith Solo Scenario.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN on 15 November 2019

Stuart Asquith’s Roman and Pictish Army 15mm Peter Laing figures

Preparing for an Ancients Solo Skirmish this weekend, a tribute game in Stuart Asquith’s memory, using Stuart’s very own old 15mm Peter Laing Roman and Pictish Army.

I bought these figures, which were painted and based by Stuart, from him via an online dealer about two years ago. I have yet to split or alter the beermat bases into individually based skirmish figures.

Before I do this rebasing (which mostly involves simply cutting the multiple figure beermat bases like the archers into two individual bases), I wanted to photograph them all together, under the watchful eye of their old commander for the last time.

Email reply from Stuart Asquith assigning these troops over to me as their new Commander.

The Picts have some attractive swirly body tattoo or body paint, along with some great command figures.

Elsewhere if I want to transform these into Ancient Britons, I have some old Peter Laing 15mm British chariots somewhere and some Assyrian and Egyptian ones – good for chariot racing games.

There are some attractive 15mm Peter Laing Pictish and Roman / German Auxiliary Cavalry and Mounted Archers. There is also a non-Laing Pictish C in C on Horseback

The Roman and Pictish foot soldiers are backed up by these colourful Peter Laing Pictish and Roman Cavalry.

Many of the figures have Stuart’s unit ID notes on the bases, which I will do my best to photograph and preserve as I split up the bases to individual figures bases.

The Peter Laing Romans are superb little figures.

There are also what I take to be auxiliary troops and some great Roman artillery.

Roman Archers and officer.

I’m sure my fellow Peter Laing collector colleagues will help me ID with catalogue numbers some of these Ancients figures over the next few months.

I have other Peter Laing 15mm Ancient figures acquired over many years or dual use items from my teenage Middle and Dark Ages Peter Laing figures. Stuart’s Romans can take on (in Ancient future) my Egyptians, Greeks, Sea Peoples and others, even my Zulus. I even have a Peter Laing elephant with howdah somewhere!

I wish I’d asked Stuart for a bit of ‘commander in chief’ advice, as Ancients are a relatively new period for me, aside from playing rough games with my Airfix Romans and Britons many years ago.

I have long wanted to explore the Teutoberg type scenarios and The modern Vietnam style “natives versus more technologically equipped infantry” with milecastle ‘firebases’ etc https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/full-metal-hic-jacet/

However there are his many books to give me some strategy advice.

As well as Stuart’s very simple rules in his books (pictured), there are also simple Ancients rules in Donald Featherstone’s War Games (1962), which also has as an appendix my favourite ‘Close Wars’ Skirmish rules.

So still a little work to do to get my Skirmish game ready for Sunday / Monday in Stuart’s memory.

I have chosen a scenario from the Stuart Asquith book of Solo Wargaming.

The WW1 centenary (2014) ‘soldier’ beer is ready.

Preparation of the game blog post to follow.

Blog posted by Mark, Man of TIN on 15 November 2019

A Muffled Drum for Stuart Asquith

Legionaries, Tribesmen, your former General & painter Stuart Asquith is no more. 15mm Laings

Saddened to hear of the passing of Stuart Asquith, former wargames magazine editor and author:

http://grandduchyofstollen.blogspot.com/2019/11/stuart-asquith.html

https://battlegames.co.uk/stuart-asquith/

It is often said that a man dies two deaths, once when he physically dies and second when he is past living memory and his name and works are forgotten.

Someone like Stuart Asquith with his magazine columns and books, along with the many figures he painted, will not be forgotten, at least not by a small band of wargamers of a certain age and hopefully younger people who discover his simple approach in his accessible wargaming books.

Beginners will not forget borrowing from branch libraries or now tracking down online his Military Modelling Guide to Wargaming, which had lots of entry level plastic figures and simple rules. I still have and use the local branch library copy that I borrowed as child, picked up cheaply when it was sold off by the library service.

Solo Wargamers will not forget his interesting book on the topic with some innovative solo games mechanisms.

Siege Wargamers will not forget his book on this unusual subject.

I really like his Comfortable Wargaming articles with their laid back, enjoy your games approach with No Units. No Morale Tests: “If you want to shell out around £30 for a set of rules, then feel free, but you know, you really don’t have to – don’t worry about phases or factors, go back to simple enjoyment.”

http://lonewarriorswa.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Comfortable-War-Gaming.pdf

I never met Stuart in person but you feel like you sort of know somebody when you have read and reread their books and magazines for 30 to 40 years.

However in the last couple of years I was fortunate enough to be able to say a small thank you for all that he had done for my hobby.

I heard from Stuart after reprinting some sections of the Brian Carrick article Big Wars on 54mm gaming sections from the Battle For Wargamers Military Modelling Wargames Manual on my blog(s) as part of a discussion on 54mm garden gaming.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/30/brian-carricks-big-wars-article/

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/06/30/brian-carricks-big-wars/

Stuart asked if anyone had a spare copy of this Manual magazine / annual as he could not find his own copy. He wanted to see a copy again but there were no second hand copies around. Not wishing to part with the original (a treasured gift from my Dad), I managed to photocopy it all and send it in a presentation folder to him.

It was my small way of saying thanks for all he had done for simplifying and inspiring my hobby over many years. I was happy to have given him a weekend of comfortable wargames nostalgia.

I was trying not to be a total fanboy but Stuart Asquith – the Stuart Asquith – had read my blogs. He left a comment on them and then I had a few emails from him.

Could I have imagined that as an 1970s 1980s Airfix kid pushing my plastic armies around a felt cloth on the dining room table?

1981: My first Osprey book written by Stuart, bought to help paint my first Peter Laing ECW Army

The editor of the wargames bits and books from Military Modelling Magazine, Stuart Asquith was a giant in my Airfix boy eyes, along with Donald Featherstone. More important to me than any 1970s or 80s popstar, TV celebrity or footballer. (No, you’re right, that is a bit total fanboy but still …)

I was delighted and not a little surprised to hear that he was still enthusiastic and active in our wonderful hobby, cropping up on some of his regular gaming partners’ blogs. Hope for us all yet …

Stuart’s former 15mm Peter Laing troops https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/full-metal-hic-jacet/

I received an appreciative email or two back from Stuart, who was also pleased when I let him know that his 15mm Peter Laing Roman Army and Ancient British Celtic armies were in good hands, mine, and still in use. Painted and used by Stuart, they now take pride of place amongst many treasured objects in my games room, still looking good after many years but awaiting rebasing.

They receive a passing mention of these very troops in his Comfortable Wargaming article in the form of Boadicea in her chariot that Peter Laing had specially made for Stuart, one figure that he had not parted with when he started downsizing his figure collection.

Amidst our email conversations, I mentioned the Wargames Manual’s general unavailability secondhand to John Curry of the History of Wargaming Project, who started talking to Stuart about possibly reprinting the Wargames Manual as part of his long to-do list of reprints. John has already reprinted several Stuart Asquith titles. http://www.wargaming.co/recreation/asquithandwise.htm

Thinking back to my first Osprey book written by him to help paint my Pater Laing ECW armies, Stuart’s 2019 reprinted ECW rules book ought to be on my Christmas list.

Painted and owned by Stuart Asquith, I am now proud to command these 15mm Peter Laings

Tell it to the Bees …

Like bees, when their bee keepers die, I wonder if you have to break it to the tiny tin and lead men very gently that their painter and former (owner) Commander in Chief is no longer with us, gone to that Valhalla in the skies which is a bit like an eternal weekend of the Wargames Holiday Centre.

There, Stuart Asquith and Donald Featherstone, H.G. Wells and many of the wargames pioneers who are no longer with us are, I hope, having good natured arguments about wargaming in the afterlife and rolling the odd dice together …

Thank you Stuart Asquith, not forgotten, whenever and wherever a simple comfortable wargame is played and enjoyed.

I remain proud to lead his tiny legions and tribes into battle with his blessing as their new Commander.

Blog posted by Asquith fanboy Mark Man of TIN, 4/5 November 2019

B.P.S. Blog Post Script:

The Muffled Drum of the title is common at soldiers’ funerals as in this Victorian poem by Anne S. Bushby, minor poet and Victorian translator of Hans Christian Andersen http://ojs.ub.gu.se/ojs/index.php/njes/article/download/240/237

http://www.blackcatpoems.com/b/the_soldiers_funeral.html