Close Little Wars scenarios and inspiration

Retail Design World website / newsletter is an unusual read for a gamer (it informs part of my day job) but it has pages  of VM (Visual Merchandising) inspirations inspired by exhibitions, shop windows and other unusual  objects.

In the same way, I’m sure each gamer has their own scrap box, postcard, Pinterest board, DVD and bookshelf inspirations for their current games.

Here are some inspirations and scenarios I’ve  come across whilst developing Donald Featherstone’s simplest two page rules Close Wars (Appendix 2) of his 1962 War Games, my favourite gaming book.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

A keen Colonial gamer, Featherstone was focussed here on “the type of fighting that happens between small numbers of men in forests, such as in the French and Indian Wars of the late eighteenth century in America” (page 149).

My version has morphed over years into what I call “Close Little Wars“, “Bish Bash Bush” or “Bish Bash Am-Bush“, mash-up simple rules inspired by hex games, H.G. Wells, garden wargames, skirmish games and a passion for cheap plastic or glossy toy soldiers.

Scenarios of natives versus troops: 

A recent Christmas book token was swiftly transformed into five Osprey books, all with Close Little Wars applications. In no particular order:

  1. Teutoberg Forest AD 9: The Destruction of Varus and His Legions by Michael McNally Osprey Camapign 228

Close Little Wars scenarios for Airfix Romans meeting  Airfix Ancient Britons. Or maybe my Cakes of Death inspired ‘Ancient Warrior’ figure?

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2. Fort William Henry 1755-57: A Battle, Two Sieges and Bloody Massacre by Ian Castle, Osprey Campaign 260 

3. Tomahawk and Musket: French and Indian Raids in the Ohio Valley 1758 by Rene Chartrand, Osprey Raid series no. 27

Slightly later in the eighteenth century, the Revolutionary Wars in North America provide another Close Little Wars type scenario:

4. The Swamp Fox: Francis Marion’s Campaign in the Carolinas 1780 by David R. Higgins, Osprey  Raid Series no. 42. 

On another continent or island, New Zealand:

5. The New Zealand Wars 1820-72 by Ian Knight, Osprey Men at Arms series No. 487

The New Zealand Wars of Pa forts and Pakeha European troops versus successful Maori natives was a period I first read about in a series of articles in Miniature Wargames  (issues 27 to 29 August to October 1985) brought home  for the history articles by my Dad. Andy Callan also published a short set of Maori  Wars rules in Military Modelling in 1983; I never got the hang of them from the tattered magazine I bought from our school library but they had great pictures of Peter Laing figures attacking a twig stockade on shaggy deep pile carpet terrain!

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Each of these Osprey books temptingly has a back page full of Related Titles on www.ospreypublishing.com  Tempting but expensive. There’s always second hand, EBay or the library ….

Figures for Close Little Wars 

1. 40mm HE figures Holgar  Eriksonn figures from Prince August sourced home casting moulds – Cowboys and Indians, Seven Years War / 18th Century figures.

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-cowboys-and-indians-he/

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-seven-years-war-moulds/

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-french-regiments-1750/

Enjoy their wide range: http://shop.princeaugust.ie/moulds-by-theme/

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2. 30mm Spencer Smith Miniatures of American Civil War / Wild West / Eighteenth Century / American War Of Independence – first bought in plastic, still available in metal and many designed by Holger Eriksonn!

http://www.spencersmithminiatures.co.uk/html/ssm.html

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Close up of excellent 30mm settler figures in buckskins and raccoon skin hats, Spencer Smith miniatures (photo / collection: Man of TIN)

I will post a separate blog post on using these charming simple Spencer Smith 30mm figures for Little   Close Wars.

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3. Vintage Airfix

Ancient Britons and Romans, Washington’s Army, British Grenadiers, Cowboys, Wagon Train, Indians, Union Infantry, Confederate Infantry, American Civil War Artillery, Napoleonic troops, Airfix Gurkhas or Australian Infantry, Japanese Infantry.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
Vintage Airfix 8th Army versus Bedouin desert warriors – desert hexscape for my Close Little Wars scenarios. Photo/ figures: Man of TIN. 

Many other plastic 1:72 figures are now available for almost any period  – I still have some Esci Colonial Infantry,  Zulus and ‘Muslim Warriors’ from the 1980s and the Atlantic ancient Romans, Greeks, Egyptians and fabulous Wild West series with everything from teepee camps, gold mining camps, Buffaloes. All useful for scenarios of Close Little Wars.

But vintage Airfix, big and little, crumbling  as some now vintage ones now, unless if you have the recently reissued Hat or Airfix, remain for me the standard figures for conversion or play.

4. Pound Store plastic Cowboys, Indians, civilians, ‘ancient Warriors’ Romans and Knights. Usually in 54 mm scale.

5. Make your Own from Polymer Clay:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/more-diy-gaming-figure-making/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/back-to-basics-toy-soldiers/

 

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Little Close Wars Terrain – not seeing the Wood for the Trees: 

Donald Featherstone  raided his Southampton garden for his early gaming materials:

“Trees can be purchased in plastic that look very real and are quite cheap. They can also be made from loofah sponge or from plastic dyed green and stuck onto pieces of twig, or there is style of lichen moss available that makes wonderful trees. When Wargames started in the writer’s house, trees were made plentifully from pine-cones dyed green and fixed to the table with a daub of plasticine. ”  Donald Featherstone, War Games, 1962, page 41.

Featherstone’s Close Wars appendix terrain list is pure garden, park and woodland finds, a proper Nature Table.

If not blessed with a suitable garden source, there is an Australian company Bold Frontiers who make a range of trees to complement its  Armies in Plastic forest rangers and other figures http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au

http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/component/virtuemart/scenery/tree-sets

Not sure if Bold Frontiers  have UK stockists or international shipping for their trees. Armies in Plastic figures are available online from several UK sources including Steve Weston: http://plasticsoldiers.co.uk/index.php/manufacturer/armies-in-plastic/ 

We started with books to inspire interesting figure game scenarios, so let’s end this post with another interesting link on the Bold Frontiers website. As scenarios go, they have an interesting reading list for boys (and girls?) of all ages:

http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/using-our-products/adventure-stories-featuring-forests-and-jungles

Their Wilderness Battle Tactics page quotes some of the same Osprey reading inspiration as I have Above (more full circle): http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/using-our-products/wilderness-battle-tactics?showall=&start=2

I admire their slogans and ethos for a new generation of younger gamers, effectively saying to parents buy these for your kids as “the Great Alternative to Digital Games“. Bold Frontiers claim that “Boys can STRETCH their Imaginations and live the Adventure” (Boys? What about girls, including H.G. Wells’ “more Intelligent sort of Girl who likes Boys’ Games and Books“.

They  subtitle their Bold Frontiers site with a slogan close to my garden / gaming heart:  “Bring the great outdoors, indoors!

So get offscreen, grab a bag of poundstore figures, raid the garden  and get gaming!

Posted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.

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