OBE repaint figures #1

 

imageOBE figures are what Wargaming Miscellany blog author Bob Cordery calls “Other Bugger’s Efforts”, being figures painted by others that you have acquired and their credit shouldn’t be claimed by yourself.

This bunch of six repurposed or repainted Airfix WW1 British Infantry picked up in a £1 mixed bag of bashed painted OO/HO Airfix figures from a favourite second hand shop in Cornwall. (This shop  is only occasionally open when I visit, being that sort of shop, a big like the erratic supply / production of Airfix figures themselves).

Dissecting this “Airfix owl pellet”, the mixed remains of someone else’s spare or unwanted figures, I found these interesting troops.

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I like their blue and red “Imagi-Nations” sort of uniform and look forward to painting them some reinforcements.

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These give me some paint inspiration for Schneider home cast metal figures:

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imageWatch this space!

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN.

Small World Domination

Inspired by a gift a few years ago of some Prince August moulds:

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Today the playroom … Tomorrow the (small) world

This is a quick sketch for an anonymous “secret squirrel” type postcard competition / exhibition run through an art gallery a few years ago,inspired by the website http://www.postsecret.com

Oh well, the secret’s out. Plans for (small) world domination unmasked.

Quick, time to keep building and casting as fast as I can!

Home Casting 

If you want to take part in this arms (legs head and body) race, head to the traditional 54mm toy soldier multipart  moulds at http://shop.princeaugust.ie/54mm-traditional-toy-soldiers-moulds/

The great joy of these home casting ‘mix and match’ is the creation of figures – soldiers and civilians of all nations – in box sets and parades that never existed in the heyday of lead figures, before they vanished in favour of safer, unbreakable (and often now crumbling) plastic from the 1960s onwards.

Of these, in future blogposts, I’ll feature some of the stranger ones from the bands, parades, civilians and soldiers of all my ‘imagi-nations’.

The other creative way to acquire the figures of your wilder “Imagi-nations” was through conversion (plenty of collecting toy figures books in the library or out of print online for this topic) or repaint.

The toy soldier version of a car respray, some of the odd figures found online or in junkshops in my collection are childish repaints or very slop happy repaint jobs in whatever colours were available for whatever figures were required for play or parades. Again a future subject for blogposts …

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My Man of TIN Gravatar, blog icon, a Guardsman saluting, made years ago as a brooch gift from Prince August 54mm multi part traditional toy soldier mould. (Photo / figure: Man of TIN) 

Favourite gaming figures #1

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Much repainted veteran  Airfix Jungle / Australian adventurer.

Do you have a favourite gaming figure?

One of mine is this Airfix 1:32 54mm Australian WW2 officer – or as I often used him in childhood, as a garden jungle adventurer?

He made a passable Indiana Jones (yet produced several years before the film!)

This was a great figure also available in the tinier OO/HO 1:72 – 1:76 20mm scale.

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This one figure creates ideas for lots of scenarios.

Generally the Airfix Australian and Ghurka figures in 1:32 or 1:72 scale prove great adaptable ‘jungle adventure’ explorers or troops, even if you exclude the ‘modern’ machine guns etc. to add a more 19th century / early 20th century feel.

http://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/figures/world-war-2.html

In the smaller scale, add some of the adventurer and natives figures from the tiny Airfix Tarzan set (reissued by Hat c.2001/3 as Jungle Adventure). Throw in repainted Airfix Indians as ‘Jungle Warriors’ and you have the figures for an excellent jungle Close Little Wars scenario. Poundstore cowboys and natives can also be used in the larger figure scales.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

The Airfix Jungle Outpost occasionally available in 1:32 or smaller scale is a great addition to Garden Wargames or Close Little Wars game.

Alternatively the resin fish tank drowned temples from your local garden centre and aquarium store are also great fun. http://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/dioramas-buildings/dioramas-airfield-sets/bamboo-house-1-32.html

Raid the DVD cabinet for Indiana Jones and other B movie Jungle inspiration.

Get out into those flowerbeds with the larger figures and explore!

Happy Gaming!

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.

Cath Kidston Guardsmen

imageimageAn unlikely source of gaming inspiration on the high street – not my usual pound stores or hobby stores – but a trip to the usually flowery Cath Kidston shops or online store.

She often has some unusual offerings in her “vintage boy” section from Cowboys to Steam Trains and London Guardsmen.

 

A batch of these A5 notebooks in the Cath Kidston sale last year proved perfect for jotting down blog notes, games design ideas,  recording my Little Close Wars game turns etc.

Her 2016 range guardsmen includes a colourful new A5 redesign of this notebook:

http://www.cathkidston.com/cath-kidston/guards-a5-notebook-1018039

Her guardsmen design (2015) as you can see are a strange and charming toylike mix of Danish and British Guards regiments, from different periods (cross belts, modern rifles) but fun all the same.

As well as handy notebooks, Cath Kidston does pencil cases, stationery and two fabulous guardsmen mugs, both practical, useful and stylish.

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A cup of tea, a perfect complement to your toy soldier section!

Figures in the photographs are original Britain’s guardsmen and my home cast Prince August guards officer saluting, both from my collection.

A batch of Cath Kidston guardsmen design postcards also provided some useful ideas for ‘Card Warriors’ for gaming – watch this space once I’ve finished with my scalpel and glue!

The current Cath Kidston range includes a London design “Guards and Friends” (2016) featuring selection of yeoman wardens, guardsmen and police.

Lovely graphics and design extends across her website:

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The lovely guardsmen design extends across her website for the Queen’s 90th Birthday (and her online sale June 2016) 

 

 

Cath Kidston’s boys range reminds me of past birthday cards for boys which featured cars, motorbikes, steam trains, spitfires, sport and other such ‘boy things’.

More Cath Kidston inspiration from her past cowboy range alongside my colourful collection of vintage lead Cowboys will be featured in a future Man of TIN blogpost.

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.

 

 

The Brontes Games scenarios

The Bronte family juvenilia as inspiration for exotic gaming scenarios.

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Interesting 54mm Byronic or Bronteish figure picked up with other cavalrymen in The Works store for £1-£2.

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The Brontes created for their characters ( the Twelve young men)  heroic scenarios that could be adapted for the gaming table.

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Interesting scenarios for a range of small skirmishes can be found amongst the Bronte juvenilia stories such as this in Charlotte Bronte’s juvenile Two Romantic Tales.

Setting and terrain ideas to be sketched onto a gaming map:

A tropical island, unexplored, maybe a continent?

A. small natural harbour around ship under repair.

Travel through about two miles of the following terrain –

B. Cultivated grain fields, plantations of palm and almond trees

C. Olive trees groves

D. rice paddies / enclosures

Any of these (BCD) can be deemed impassable as required or require movement at half pace.

They can be random terrain scattered about or cluttered around a path.

Your characters: 12 named characters ( plus assorted ship’s crew if needed)

Your opponents: Twenty men ‘well armed’ – natives?

What happens next?

Here is the Bronte version of this Battle Narrative. Yours may end differently and be ‘game over’ for the adventurers.

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The joy of gaming is that this story could have gone very differently. What if the natives won or captured some of the Twelve adventurers?

The characters in the Bronte juvenile stories are inspired by their imagination but also real people of the age.

imageOnce the characters were established, the following scenarios are set out for the Twelve Young Men:

The Bronte family’s knowledge of the tropical realms of the expanding British empire was through books, atlases and periodicals like Blackwood’s Magazine.

The Ashantees were no doubt generic natives or tribesmen, but Britain did fight the first Anglo Ashanti  war in west Africa (now Ghana) around 1824, news of which would have been in the Brinte’s reading matter. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Ashanti_wars

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Whilst the real early Ashanti wars were fought over the slave trade and Britain’s abolition movement, one of the interests of gaming is to turn tables and see the Twelve Adventurers as imperialist invaders.

Thundering Cannon, naval Landing Parties, trumpets, war drums, wild wailing natives trying to repel the colonial invaders who man the walls in their city, burning fields, mountainous strongholds – this is the stuff of colonial gaming!

Exotic landscapes and terrain.

A releif party or news from England.

AW ‘Arthur Wellesley’ (based on the duke of Welkington, victor of Waterloo) as the Brontes had been born into the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

Figures needed for gaming this Bronte period could be culled from a mix of Napoleonic and early Victorian figures versus any available natives.

Lots of interesting ideas here to develop into games scenarios.

Illustrations from the Ashanti Empire Wikipedia entry show an Ashanti warrior with a simple musket and powder horn.

You can read more about the Brontes and their real and imaginary worlds at:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brontë_family

Blogposted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN.

Poundstore Para Dice

Do you have favourite dice?

Donald Featherstone had lucky dice that are now presented as part of the annual  Featherstone trophy.

You can spend a fortune on dice in gaming shops. Sometimes I come across some useful cheap and colourful dice that save you lots of cash to spend on figures.

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Dice £1 a pack from Tiger stores on the high street.

Having a range of colourful dice is useful as you can distinguish different figures from each other in melee and decision making dice.

I prefer standard D6 type of 6 sided dice. Some old dice become real favourites, long used; the weirdly shaped Dungeons and Dragons dice do little for me. Each to their dice own!

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A mixture of well  used dice including the hand numbered dice made as a child; the D & D dice are rarely used, a present from the early eighties.
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One day I will understand these rules and love these dice ( but not yet) …

posted by Mr MIN Man of TIN, June 2016.

Close Little Wars: Featherstone’s simplest rules?

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Vintage veteran Airfix figures Redcoats versus Settlers  (Photo / figures: Man of TIN)
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More vintage Airfix desert warriors fight over a desert hexscape. (Photo / game: Man of TIN)

To me, gaming since childhood,  many rule sets look frighteningly both expensive and offputtingly complex what with ‘combat factors’ and worse still,  lots of unfamiliar dice (always a bad sign that there’ll be advanced maths involved).

Airfix have recently launched or franchised a new battle game ‘system’ by Modiphius Games. It looks beautifully produced. You can use your old or new Airfix figures. It uses classic and familiar Airfix box artwork for illustrations. But is it more hidden maths? Is this likely to be as complicated to me as many of those dungeons and dragons rules that  I could never understand as a child? (They also had lots of strange dice, another giveaway).

My Bish Bash Am-Bush ‘Close Wars’ rules
I currently use my adapted version of the simple two page appendix rules for ‘Close Wars’ out of the back of Donald Featherstone’s War Games 1962 book.

This book pictured below is a very old favourite: it’s the original copy from my childhood local branch library, withdrawn from lending and sold to me many years later. Still by my bedside and frequently reread.

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Donald Featherstone, War Games, published by Stanley Paul, 1962.

Simple as Featherstone’s rules are in War Games, these two pages have always been a delight. They make up the core of my own fast quick simple small number of figures game that I can quickly and easily set up and play solo.

“It must be confessed that the question of how to fight a successful action with natives against disciplined troops has yet to be completely solved by the writer.”

This is a gaming problem that Donald Featherstone mentions with several brief solutions on page 58 of his “How to Start a War Game” chapter in War Games (1962). He solves it pretty well in my view in his Close Wars appendix (page 149-150).

A keen Colonial gamer, Featherstone was focussed here on “the type of fighting that happens between small numbers of men in forests, such as in the French and Indian Wars of the late eighteenth century in America” (page 149). Close Wars has many applications to other periods as brutal fighting in forests between organised troops and natives has not changed much since Ancient times.

Look out for future Close Little Wars scenarios and inspirations blogposts.

What do I  like most about the Close Wars rules ?

  1. “Small numbers of men in forests”, possibly large figure sizes

I’ve always liked these simple fast  Bish Bash Am-Bush rules using about 20 to 25 odd figures each side. If rules have figures representing more than 1 figure: 1 man I get brain freeze and lose interest …

With such small numbers, you can also have Close Little Wars games set in many periods with only needing a few figures each side. Alternatively as I usually play Bronte style “imagi-nations”, I often mix the periods up if suitable figures aren’t around; this is not far from the plot of  the 1969 Dr. Who ‘The War Game’ episodes (still available in book, audiobook or DVD form). https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War_Games

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A cluttered terrain of Heroscape hexes and natural materials on a handy portable tray,  set out for 15mm Peter Laing figures. (Photo / game: Man of TIN)

2. “The terrain must be crowded with material

“To play chess one needs a chessboard”, Featherstone writes as his opening to chapter 3, “How to Lay Out a Battlefield”.

After years of raiding and returning natural materials to the  garden and yard for Close Wars terrain, I tried not very successfully making my own interlocking paper hexes (a bit like those “endless landscape” cards from Tobar / Hawkin’s Bazaar). Fiddly and unfulfilling. Much more happily, I then found on Ebay several damaged starter boxes of plastic MB ‘Heroscape’ sets, bought  mostly to acquire the interlocking plastic hex tiles of rock, water, mud (and whatever else you paint them as ).

The starter sets include some useful fantastic / fantasy figures, dragons and usual (to me) incomprehensible rules.  I think this game system bombed in the US and UK, apart from a very very niche cult following, hence the cheap starter sets around. I bought Heroscape partly so that I can build quick 3D landscapes for these Close Wars scenarios.

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3D hex terrain using Heroscape terrain fought over by a mixed bunch of Peter Laing 15mm natives versus redcoats. Photo/ game: Man of TIN

Heroscape is almost a 3D kind of early Minecraft but also combines well with natural materials. You can use the hexes as they come already coloured. Alternatively you can flock them, gravel them with railway ballast or fine beach sand / stones or paint them.

Piled up with garden or hard sourced twig logs, stones, lichen and moss bushes and other impassable features, these Heroscape hexes work really well with even just a small tray or table for a short skirmish. Being hexes, with adapted rules, there is  no need for rulers and measuring inches.

“Fill any bare spaces with pieces of twig to represent fallen logs and trees …” Donald Featherstone.

Using natural materials to enhance the hex boards feels a little like the joy of  Garden Wargames but with the comfort of indoors! A little less fuss about wet weather and creaky knees but still retaining some of the childhood fun of “fight them on the beaches” (sandpit), the “landing grounds” (lawn), the “jungles and forests” (shrubbery and flower beds) of childhood. A bit of dirt, some fresh air and sunshine, all that the childhood gurus want for modern children held prisoner indoors by tiny screens. Maybe Heroscape hexes are the indoor Terrarium or Bottle Garden version of garden wargaming, but it’s not far off the improvised spirit of H.G. Wells’ Floor Games and Little Wars use of real sprigs of bush and hedge trimmings.

I have also rediscovered on Project Gutenberg the original HG Wells Little Wars rules that I read once as a child in reprint and could never borrow again from my local  branch library. It’s charmingly illustrated with line drawings in a suitably childish toy soldier way. Floor Games by Wells is also available on Project Gutenberg.

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Peter Laing 15mm ‘native’ bowmen (really Egyptians) defend the bridge amid a crowded Close Little Wars hex game board. (Photo / game: Man of TIN)

3. Flexible scales and figure sizes 

My version of Donald Featherstone’s Close Wars rules and these interconnecting Heroscape hexes work really well with my original childhood 15mm Peter Laing English Civil War figures. I have been buying up some  EBay oddments of Peter Laing figures, becoming more collectable now that Peter Laing has retired and the moulds vanished. (More on collecting Peter Laing in future blogposts.)

The rules and hexes work equally well with Airfix OO/HO or 1:72 figures.

 

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As I scale up to DIY made ‘cakes of death’ figures (round about an inch high) or 30 to 40mm Prince August and Schneider home cast figures, I shall have to rethink the original Close Wars inches or my hexed up Bish Bash Am-Bush movement and shooting ranges.

Keeping the same inch / hex move and fire ranges for different scale figures  presents some problems. Presumably the bigger the figure, the shorter the time period each hex move represents (if you simplistically keep to the same hex movement ranges) ? This doesn’t solve the firing range problem though.

There are some interesting thoughts on scaling up and down ranges and distances on the Sheil’s USA simple ‘sandpit’ rules for using plastic pound store figures on the Sheil family’s lovely USA Toy Army Men section of their Thor Trains website, adaptable to the garden, beach, sandpit or floor (though even these rapidly become a little complex for me).

You decide what the basic range is. All others are multiples of that range.

The Sheil family “Jersey Shore Battle Games: The Basics”

More on ranges and scales and Sheil family rules etc on a future blogpost The Sheil Sandpit rules seem to be in the spirit of H.G. Wells’ original rules.


And finally …

Close Little Wars, Bish Bash Bush! or Bish Bash Am-Bush!

Rules adapted from ‘Close Wars’ the 2 page Appendix of Donald Featherstone’s War Games (1962) in respectful tribute to Donald Featherstone (1918-2013)

Fast, simple and often fatal rules for small troop action versus ‘natives’ in cluttered bush terrain on a small scale table or hex grid for 15mm and 20mm troops or even outdoors with 54 mm troops in the garden, yard or sand pit.

Suits Cowboys, Indians, Bandits, Pirates, French-Indian wars, Natives and others … Whatever you have …

Especially suitable for solo play.

Donald Featherstone sets out simple aims or what would now be called Victory Conditions:

The aim of each force unless otherwise described is:
1. to seek out and destroy their enemy.
2. Alternatively, to get at least 50% of your troops to the opposite enemy baseline

However for each game, you can set your own scenario end or Victory Conditions. This usually involves fighting to the last man, but occasionally involves rescuing or escorting to safety the Governor General’s Daughter (always the same handy Airfix Wagon Train girl or lady civilian) or the secret plans.

Movement Rates

Natives on foot move 9 inches per move or 3 hex / squares.

Troops in groups of 3 or less also move 9 inches or 3 hex / squares.

Uphill moves count as 2 hex / squares or half a move e.g. 4.5 inches.

Troops in groups of 4 or more move only 6 inches per move or 2 hex / squares. (Uphill moves of 1 hex square).

Difficult Terrain
If deemed passable, Fording streams take 3 inches or 1 hex to cross. Fording places or bridges can be marked out.

Bogs and marshes (if deemed passable) at half speed eg 1 or 2 hex squares.

Moves on clear paths or roads (if they exist) have 3 inch extra or 1 hex extra BONUS.

Firing (if range of fire clear)
Range of rifles and longbows or crossbows (slingshots?) – 12 inches or 4 hexes
Pistols and spears half range – 6 inches or 2 hexes.

Throw one d6 dice per firing man: 6 scores a hit.
If firer is under cover or in buildings, 5 or 6 scores a hit on enemy.

For each man hit, throw a casualty saving throw.
If fired on, each casualty has a d6 thrown for him. 4,5,6 wounded and carry on. If 123, casualty is  deaded.
If casualty under cover, 3,4,5,6 wounded and carry on. 123 deaded.

To check line of sight / range of fire, the Lionel Tarr reversed periscope can be used for fun to get you down to table top toy soldier eye level.

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Periscope from Tiger high street  stores, about £1 to £2.

 

Taking Turns

Turns consist of four sections:
a) First side moves (possible melee)
b) Other side fires.
c) First side fires
d) Other side moves (possible melee)

Throw dice at start of each game turn for each side to see who moves first.

Variations on this include: 1st  side Move, 2nd side Move, 1st side  Fire, 2nd side  Fire.

Melee / Messy Bish Bash Bush bit!
Assume each man has something to fight at close hand with (pistols, clubs, swords, rifles, bayonets, fists or boots, etc)

We are playing 1:1 scale each figure represents one man.

Melee is joined when one group of figures invades or faces the other square / hex.

You can add +1 to d6 throw for attacking side  if you choose / can be bothered. This is what Featherstone calls impetus bonus.

Choose pairs (of attacker vs. defender) and throw 1 d6 for each man involved.
Attacker can have  the + 1 added to their d6 dice throw (if you choose or can be bothered).
Highest score wins, loser throws casualty saving throw to see if killed 1-3 or only wounded / unharmed.
Continue until each man has been involved in melee.

“Usual dice saving throws for melee Casualties”  – Donald Featherstone. Or not if you want to speed things up. 

 

Melee Morale Test (if desired / wanted / can be bothered)
At end of melee session, throw d6 for each side to see who wins melee morale test and who retires 1 hex backwards.
Then d6 again for losers to see if routed:

Throw 1-3 in rout unable to fire or move further that round. Roll again next move to see if still routed and retreating. A suitable coloured marker can be added to remember this.
or throw 4-6 in good order, retreat only one pace / hex.

Not really got round to adding cavalry or cannons yet in this Last of the Mohicans / Robin Hood / Hollywood B Movie cowboy ambush bash up or mash up. 

Featherstone also adds the final paragraph section about attacking troops in the flank or rear that you can choose to use or not. Keep it as simple as you like.

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Ancient warriors rules
If using your Knights,  ancients or partly armoured men, Featherstone (and Tony Bath?) Ancients rules from War Games (1962) had various protection/ survival elements modifying casualty saving throws after firing or melee. Use as you see fit:

If casualty unarmoured and without shield,  throw 6 to live.
If casualty wearing armour or shield, 5 or 6 to live.
If armour and shield, 4,5 or 6 to live.
Unarmoured cavalry 5 or 6 to live (6 saves rider alone).
Armoured cavalry 4, 5 or 6 to live (4 saves rider alone).

Inevitably over time, new troops acquired will need new rules. What about cavalry, if they can operate in such Close Wars terrain? What about artillery? It might be a small forest outpost fort you are defending with your single gun … An artillery train would be near impossible in such cluttered terrain as the British fought over  in America.

Close Wars has many possible small fort scenarios – awaiting the relieving column, escorting a supply wagon, sending out or rescuing a patrol.

Most important rule 
If you’re ever not sure of the rules or what to do next, especially if playing solo: If in doubt about a decision or situation devise a suitable d6 dice throw e.g. Roll 1 to 3,  group retreat to safety, roll 4 to 6 attack nearest enemies.

Another example of a rule that was needed on the spot when troops had some rescued civilians / the Governor General’s daughter with them and were surrounded in a building: If figures are holed up in a building, throw 6 for automatic risking breakout (unless group decide or are ordered to leave). But then do civilians always follow orders? Throw again: 1 to 3 non combatants stay, 4 to 6 non combatants or civilians leave with the troops.

Another example of a “made up dice throw rule” which emerged:
Crossing bridges (or fordable rivers)
Throw d6 for each man, roll 1= Lose footing and  lost in river, to be eaten by crocodiles and piranhas etc; you can use casualty saving throws or not as required.

Officer casualties: If needed to determine an officer casualty amongst group, throw a coloured dice (for officer) amongst X others for correct X number of men. Lowest score loses etc. To be fair, officers don’t have much of a magical morale rule or role  anyway in this Close Little Wars scenario.

Add rules or make them up as needed, play as you go …

Misquoting Miley Cyrus, “This is our house , this is our rules …” and I’m sticking to them for now. Anyway I don’t tend to argue with myself, playing solo.

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I think Stuart Asquith summed it up well when he finished his “Comfortable Wargaming” article: “Note: There are no units, no morale throws” etc. and “no need to spent 30 quid on rules Sets either“. Read his  article (generous free download!) on the Lone Warrior solo wargamers association newsletter website:
http://lonewarriorswa.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Comfortable-War-Gaming.pdf

Happy gaming!

Leave your thoughts through the comments pages.

Posted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.