Peter Laing 15mm blog photographer

Following up my “favourite Peter Laing figure?” Blogpost,  I asked knowledgeable enthusiast  Ian Dury about 15mm Peter Laing figures  whether Peter Laing had ever made a 15mm photographer figure, knowing how much Ian and others liked his Victorian Parade Range.

As far as Ian was aware, Peter Laing hadn’t made such a figure, so the natural thing to do was a quick conversion.

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Peter Laing tiny 15mm photographer conversion with Northern infantry in the background beyond the bridge. (Photograph / figures/ Man of TIN)

A colonial British infantry heliograph operator in pith or foreign service helmet  (A605) made a good basic figure for a photographer with his tripod. The addition of a tiny black plastic Qixel cube or square bead roughed in for the clunky camera or early cine film apparatus. Until I find a smaller cube, it’ll do.

I let this tiny ‘blogs of war’ photographer loose on the my portable game board  ‘battlefield’ of an impending North / South skirmish to take the combatant’s pictures. I think some time travel will be required if he is to document other such skirmishes.

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Our tiny 15mm Peter Laing blog photographer focuses in on Southern troops (F3009) advancing, led by a scratch-built Fimo polymer clay standard bearer with his home spun Southern flag. (Pictures / figures: Man of TIN)
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Our tiny photographer captures this image of Butternut Southern infantry (F3010) heading into action. The famous Peter Lang sheep can be seen in the background near the Northern infantry.  (Photograph: Man of TIN blog staff photographer)

 

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And again in colour …

More pictures of my newly painted and based Northern and Southern / Blue and Grey infantry on my next blog post.

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, August 2016.

 

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Maori Wars update

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My Peter Laing Colonials and Blues and Greys versus the Generican Natives – Not quite the Maori Wars (Figure / Photos: Man of TIN)

imageAs a follow up to my earlier Maori Wars and Peter Laing related blog posts, here are the Andy Callan rules in full – or so I thought!

John The Wargames Hermit blogger in the USA was interested in these Maori bush wars rules and as back copies of this issue of Military Modelling magazine are probably quite scarce (I have hacked most of my magazines to pieces), I have added the missing section.

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The amended Maori Wars rules by Andy Callan in Military Modelling, December 1983.

However, flicking through my box file, I found that the above rules as printed in September 1983 Military Modelling had some errors – they were corrected by Andy Callan in a half page erratum page in Military Modelling December 1983.

I also noticed in the book list that the Ian Knight who wrote the excellent Osprey book on the New Zealand Wars had also written a couple of interesting articles called “Fire in the Bush” in Military Modelling  in April and November 1980, worth tracking down.

I also found some interesting articles on the New Zealand Wars in that most reliable of sources, Wikipedia.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musket_Wars

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_Wars featuring the unusual war memorial

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_New_Zealand

These entries also features some interesting pictures, including:

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The Death of Von Tempsky 1868 by Kennett Watkins. Wikipedia Public Domain source

An atmospheric view of the terrain is shown  in “The Death of Von Tempsky at Te Ngutu o Te Manu”, a portrayal of an incident in the New Zealand wars on 7 September 1868. Apparently published in the New Zealand Mail, last produced in 1907, this Lithograph from 1893 by William Potts (1859-1947) was made from a painting by Kennett Watkins (1847-1933). Wikipedia image in public domain.

Utu is a New Zealand Maori Wars film from 1983/1984 (with director’s Utu – Redux  cut issued about 2013) that I have never yet seen, here described: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086497/ 

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My Peter Laing Reenactment Society – the Maori Carpet Wars re-enacted in black and white  (Figures / photo: Man of TIN)

For my previous posts featuring the Maori Wars:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/peter-laing-figures-in-carpet-forests/  featuring the rest of Andy Callan’s article

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/close-little-wars-scenarios-and-inspiration/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

Happy (Maori War) Gaming.

Blog Postscript (B.P.S.)

I had an interesting email from Andy Callan last week about his Maori Wars rules, surprised to see his Maori rules and hair roller armies still in use.

Andy Callan: “Wow! That’s a real blast from the past. When I wrote these rules I saw them as a sort of Victorian assymetrical Vietnam equivalent – high tech westerners vs wily bunkered-down natives…
I’m still actively wargaming and writing new stuff. Have a look on Amazon for Peter Dennis’ Battle for Britain and you will see what I am currently up to … Good to hear from you. What a great hobby this is – it is still keeping me busy nearly fifty years after I started out!” 

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, August 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

My favourite Peter Laing figure?

 

imagePossibly my favourite of Peter Laing’s 15mm figures, this is the dismounted Dragoon firing (figure F515) from his English Civil War range.

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I’m not entirely sure why it’s probably my favourite Peter Laing figure (at least of the non marching advancing figures). Is it the colour scheme or the slightly independent elite status of dragoons?

Anyone else got a favourite (Peter Laing)  gaming figure?

I’m not suggesting however that we start a Peter Laing “guess my  favourite figure” charades competition as some gamers allegedly do for Airfix figures, according to reliable sources in Harry Pearson’s autobiography  Achtung Schweinhund! That would be little too niche …

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I have a few spare unpainted ones of these figures already destined to become 7th Cavalry or dismounted Union Cavalry in a very different Civil War, so will see how that paint conversion works out.

Happy gaming!

Posted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, 1st August 2016.

Peter Laing “PL P.S.” postscript

Lovely to hear from several Peter Laing fans and Bloggers on favourite figures – both John The Wargames Hermit and Ian Dury liked Peter’s Late Victorian Parade figures, bicyclists and goose stepping figures.

Ian Dury sent me this picture of his favourites. Thanks Ian for sharing these:

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Peter Laing enthusiast Ian Dury’s favourite goose-stepping Prussian figures from his 19th Century collection, beautifully painted.  (Photo: Ian Dury)

 

 

Miniature Wargames Magazine Milestone Issues 1 and 400

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I bought the latest issue of Miniature Wargames with Battlegames  number 400 this week (August 2016 issue) at W.H. Smith’s  on the local high street. To be honest  I haven’t bought this magazine much over the last ten to thirty years, beginning to read it again about two months ago on a long train journey.

To be honest the local High Street has changed a lot too since I read issue 1 in late 1982. Just around the corner is the vanished Woolworth’s, now Poundland or Wilko, both home to erratic supplies of cheap pound store plastic warriors. Nearby  is the sad site of an empty British Home Stores; never again  will I have an affordable family snack (shades of John Shuttleworth there) in the BHS café, a High Street standby since childhood shopping trips. Instead there are dozens of coffee shops, clothes,  lifestyle and interior shops to choose from.

The High Street today feels like the obituary columns of the last few years as childhood icons of light entertainment and music from the 1970s to 80s die off or are (posthumously) disgraced.

So how have things changed in the gaming world between Issue no. 1 late 1982 of Miniature Wargames and this milestone issue number 400, now edited by Henry Hyde?

In his editorial in issue 400, Henry Hyde reflects on first writing for the original magazine under the original Editor Duncan McFarlane in issue 47 which would have been in the mid 1980s.

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Henry was writing his Editorial or Briefing as the  Brexit vote was declared and  writes about his hopes that Brexit will not affect the friendly gaming fraternity’s travels and the business side of the wargames / gaming / fantasy industry across Europe.

One of the reasons I haven’t bought many gaming magazines over the last ten to thirty years since regularly gaming as a child and teenager  is the boxfile of Miniature Wargames I have kept from its first issue through to its early twenties. Along with a couple of folders of useful Military Modelling tips, history and gaming articles cut out and filed away in plastic A4 sleeves, these have been just enough for when the gaming mood has recurred over the last thirty years like a benign form of malaria. For some people their recurring malaria or family curse  is steam trains or sci-if, for me it is toy soldiers and gaming.

On the rare occasions since the late 1980s that I have bought or more likely flicked through random issues of games magazines in the newsagents,  I have found many of them very advertorial, very product and current  games system based, great if you’re playing that complex games system,  puzzling or dull if not.

The launch issue of Miniature Wargames brought home for me by my late father was of great interest, not least for the eight full pages of colour photographs of figures and terrain from Peter Gilder’s Wargames Holiday Centre in Yorkshire (which featured in a two page article). “We shall  have great regards for the aesthetics of the hobby …” Duncan Macfarlane the Editor claimed in his introductory Editorial. The magazine certainly did. These were not the Airfix and assorted plastic figures I had grown up with.  Airfix figures featured in Donald Featherstone books. Where were they here? This was the grown up world of hex boardgames and metal gaming figures.

Miniature Wargames is now £4.50 a month; the 75 pence cover price of Issue 1 in 1982  was almost beyond my reach at the time, if I was to buy any figures or paints but this magazine remained a kind monthly gift from my dad for several years. That meant 10 more Peter Laing foot figures a month …

The articles in Issue 1 were by some games people I had heard of in Military Modelling (also first encountered around c. 1981/82) or from borrowing their books in the local library:  Terry Wise, George Gush and  Phil Barker.

An article on Computer Assisted Wargaming by Mike Costello was forward looking but beyond me in 1982 (and arguably now)  – “A minimum of 12K usable memory will be needed …” for programming, less than the average single email today?

Some articles I found beyond me at the time, such as Paddy Griffiths’ article about Wargames Developments which formed in May 1980  and mentioned their journal or newsletter  ‘The Nugget’, edited then as now by one Bob Cordery, writer of Wargaming Miscellany, one of the gaming blogs I regularly read.

Now having rethought my way through some early Featherstone rules,  I find the Wargames  Developments  much more accessible now. Good reason to keep these early articles and refer back to them.

The idea of ‘fanzine style’ digital colour photography enriched  gaming blogs and digital download copies of magazines were in 1982  almost Science Fiction in themselves at the time. At the time  Peter Laing’s lists were typewritten and reproduced faintly on A4, as were John Mitchell’s English Civil War starter rules that I bought from Peter Laing (I will post more about these soon).

Hex-A-Noughts the free Sci Fi Board Game by Julian D. Fuller, a staff writer who also reveiwed several board games in this issue, remains uncut in my Issue 1 and unused to this day. These were way beyond my ‘bear of little brain’ style of gaming both then and now, preferring the simple ‘back of postcard’ rules that began to appear in later MW  issues.

The article on building “Small Buildings for the Battlefield”  by Ian Weekley of Battlements with some inspiring but sadly black and white photos was of more immediate use. Basil Fletcher of Fortress Models and Ian Weekley’s “How to build terrain  and fortresses”  articles would be a great reason to keep buying Miniature Wargames over the next few years. A one page article by John Sharples on random generation of the location of terrain features is something I still use today as a solo gamer.

The article on the English Civil War  siege of Chester and Battle of Rowton Heath 1645 by Terry Wise  and an excellent  article by Nick Slope  on A  Plain man’s Guide to 15mm Figure Painting would soon become very useful once I made it to the adverts pages.

It was overall the colour pictures of terrain and figures that caught my attention then as today, since  most wargames books at the time were sparsely and often badly illustrated in black and white. Colour pictures still form an important and inspiring part of Miniature Wargames  today, along with the ever important adverts.

Amongst  the familiar names are some ranges that survive today, others are now the subject of wargames blogs and vintage figure hunting. There are late 1982 adverts for Minifigs, Jacobite Miniatures, QT Models,  Heroics and Ros,  Skytrex, Campaign Figures, Chronicle and Dixon Miniatures, Wargames Research Group, Gallia Buildings, Irregular Miniatures, Standard Games with its Felt Hexes  and Cry Havoc games (paper soldiers). Bill Lamming’s advert is cancelled by an overprint breaking news – “Bill Lamming Has Retired.” I hope Bill enjoyed a happy retirement!

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My battered Gallia 15mm farmhouse and lovely Peter Laing English Civil War Figures on the adverts page of Miniature Wargames Issue No. 1, late 1982 – stop press Bill Lamming Has Retired! but Irregular Miniatures still going strong! (Photo /  figures: Man of TIN)

The adverts are interesting from the point of view today of  possible alternative universes of “what if I had chosen those figure ranges and periods rather than that one?”

The one that caught my eye and matched my schoolboy pocket money funds was Peter Laing’s 15mm English Civil War range. “Send 21p stamps for List and Sample” from  “Over 750 items from Ancients to WW2”.

Write off I did and the ECW sample must have impressed as I bought hundreds of Peter Laing  English Civil War and Medieval figures over the next few years. What wasn’t to like about foot figures at 7p, his curious horses and riders at 14p and guns or waggons at 20p? I still have them and still use them regularly today.

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Some of my lovely Peter Laing pikemen and musketeers surround that fateful advert from Miniature Wargames No. 1, late 1982 (Photo / figures: Man of TIN)

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Scroll forward 34 years from 1982 to 2016  and for a magazine to achieve 400 monthly issues is quite an achievement. I was surprised a few months ago to still find it on the magazine shelves. Airfix magazine  has gone and come back again, Military Modelling has survived and even Miniature Wargames was launched in the demise / aftermath of Battle for Wargamers merging with Military Modelling.

As launch Editor  Duncan MacFarlane observed in his opening Editorial,

“Those of you with a knowledge of the recent history of wargames magazines may well consider our launching of this one to be a somewhat perilous adventure! However there is definitely a gap to be filled; no general circulation wargame magazine has succeeded in establishing itself since the demise of  “Battle” several years ago. We feel that we can become established because we have a solid financial basis from the outset and thus have several advantages over those magazines which have tried and failed in the recent past.” Editorial, Issue 1 Miniature Wargames.

400 issues on in Miniature Wargames  there are regular or perennial favourite articles such as new figure, rules, board games or book reviews and exhibition reports  that would not be out of place 34 years ago, but are now enhanced with beautiful colour photographs.

However being up to date on the hobby, there is a regular review article on  wargames blogs where Henry Hyde the “Editor takes his regular reconnaissance flight over the digital front line”, beautifully and wittily phrased.  

Interestingly Henry’s opening rant is about “anonymous blogs …so please reveal who you are. if you are broadcasting to the world and want us to read what you write, the least you can do is have the courtesy to tell us who you are!” Whoops! I, Mr MIN, Man of TIN have been duly warned.

Similarly technological and unimaginable in 1982 is a Kickstarter funded “Miniature Wargaming the Movie” by Joseph Piddington, reviewing the past, present and future of the hobby from H.G. Wells to modern figure designers, a Who’s Who of the industry. A documentary movie like this is a natural step, developing the thriving YouTube and podcast audio-visual citizen contribution to the gaming hobby. Unimaginable in 1982, even before you could imagine  an 80s Cable TV station for wargames?

YouTube of course allows you now to track down the slow  but beautiful Gilder landscaped wargames  featured on Tyne Tees 1978 TV series Battleground, which hopefully visually did for the “Aesthetics” of the hobby on TV what Miniature Wargames did (and still does) in magazine form. Duncan Macfarlane, then a school librarian in Hull and soon to be the original Editor of Miniature Wargames,  featured as one of the two gamers in the Edgehill episode in  1978.

Some authors continue to pioneer and review their scene, John  Treadaway having written about fantasy since I started reading his articles in the Battle for Wargamers Wargames Manual (Military Modelling Magazine Extra, MAP 1983) and he’s still reviewing figures in Miniature Wargames Issue 400, 3o+ years on.

Lovely  article in MW 400 as part of a series  by Diane Sutherland, “Wargames widow“, in this issue for example turning  a pound store gardening bundle of willow twigs into frontier log cabins. One project to try, after searching pound stores for more cheap plastic warriors  of course! I remember another series of similar articles by women gamers, modellers or wargames widows like Nell Clipsom in early Miniature Wargames issues.

Paper Soldiers return? 

I look forward to photocopying, downloading (what did that mean in 1982?) and printing off the free French Foreign Legion game paper  figures  featured in an interesting exhibition demonstration game by Phil Dutre from Belgium.The stepped hill idea was just brilliant. Aesthetics were certainly there in bundles … and a French Foreign Legion Airfix Desert Outpost just like mine at home.

What with the new release of Helion books wargaming series of paper soldiers and rules reviewed in issue 399, who would have thought that paper soldiers would be making a comeback?

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Junior General website aside, these paper figures are gifts that remind me of those included as a giveaway from  the Standard Games Saxon Army paper figures (now unobtainable?) given away free in the Battle For Wargamers Wargames Manual (Military Modelling Magazine Extra special issue, MAP 1983) and advertised for sale (then £2) in the back pages of Miniature Wargames Issue number 1. Scanned copies of these may be gracing my tabletop this Autumn to coincide with the 1066 Battle of Hastings anniversary.

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Standard Games Saxon Army warriors, free card gift in the Battle for Wargamers Wargames Manual (1983)

“Old School” wargames and large scale games (featuring fabulous Spencer Smith Miniatures and 18th century games) are a colourful feature of Issue 400.

Henry Hyde, having jokingly in his own words  “burnt out” several regular MW contributors, has now turned this space over to an interesting new feature that I hope runs and runs – Wargaming My Way,  featuring a different contributor each issue. Could be one to watch …

Burnout or stress of a different type is featured in the Miniature Wargames / Battlegames commendable contribution to PTSD forces charity Combat Stress (the veterans’ mental health charity),  a lingering and crippling after-effect of service more widely understood and publicly supported since witnessing  the effect on the service generation of the Falklands War of 1982 (Miniature Wargames’ launch year), Iraq, Afghan and Northern Ireland conflicts. Thankfully this charity is in place and the condition recognised now that the last of my own 1980s school friends who became  servicemen are retiring from the forces.

Towards Miniature Wargames Issue 800 to be downloaded in 2050?

Joy and Forgetfulness blog author Conrad Kinch in his regular page offer hints on how to encourage or include new  wargamers  or hobbyists, something discussed in Issues  398 or 399 as my whole generation and above gets older, who will be buying the Airfix figures or their own version of my much loved  Peter Laing figures in 10 to 20 years time?

Teaming up with model railway exhibitions and other craft hobbies into multi-faceted hobby exhibitions is  one interesting suggestion in an article by David R. Clemmet and Thomas Davidson from issue 398. Model railway enthusiasts (for some people, their version of the recurring hobby malaria that they  can never quite shake off throughout life)  are apparently pondering the same “who will play with Hornby trains or model railways in 20 years?”  question.

Will all the games have gone digital or 3D Virtual Reality by 2050?

Will the missing Peter Laing moulds have turned up by then?

If there are any of us still left gaming by 2050, maybe, just maybe  I will by have gotten around to contributing 2000 words towards Miniature Wargames new feature “Wargaming My Way” on the stuff you might have seen on this blog over the next 34 years on very, very simple rule sets and cake decoration soldiers.

Woolworths, BHS and other staples of British life have gone since 1982. Airfix figure supplies come and go. Miniature Wargames magazine and this hex-scapist, diverting and fulfilling hobby and community  will hopefully keep going strong for another 400 issues. Huzzah!

Happy Anniversary Henry Hyde and his team at Miniature Wargames, 400 issues young!

Posted by the (irritatingly anonymous) Mr MIN, Man of TIN, July 2016.

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A few of my surviving Hair Roller Army troops next to Heroics and Ros 1:300 / 5mm Greek spearman (Photo / figures: Man of TIN) 

Postscript

Miniature Wargames No. 2 featured a well-remembered article by Paddy Griffiths of Wargames Developments which featured the infamous Hair Roller Armies, an idea developed into artillery, wagons, cavalry and full ACW rules by Andy Callan in Miniature Wargames No. 9. This went down really well (or not) in a family with hair dressing amongst its trades, namely “WHERE ARE MY BEST HAIR ROLLERS?” I still have them today. But this is a topic for another blogpost.

Does anyone else still have theirs?

Cakes of Death Guardsman

 

 

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1970s cake decoration plastic Drum Major (photo / figure: Man of TIN)

This 30mm white plastic cake decoration guardsman was around when I was a child, whether  I hope a left over ‘treasure’  from a family birthday cake or maybe just part of a random jumble sale bag.

I can’t recall his origin but this Drum Major  was too big to fit with my other figures, so I kept him aside in my odds box.

The idea of a parade or band of these marching over a cake seemed highly appealing.

I always loved the decorated cakes on display in our local bakery window. Beyond the reach of most ordinary families in the 70s and 80s,  who did you know who had a ‘boughten’ birthday cake from a shop? I recall staring for many years at the same  pale green and white line iced football match cake with players and goals. Clever but by then very very stale!

It was also fascinating to rummage through the boxes and boxes of cake decorations in bakers or stationers, but they were pretty expensive for such cheap and badly painted plastic. Seemingly the boxes always seemed far too full of wedding cake figures or ballerinas, rather than useful, convertible figures for gaming.

Sadly I have yet to find an online museum of vintage cake decorations to find out more about this Guards Drum Major.

Fimo / Polymer Clay and Resin figures online now seem to have replaced these cake decoration selections in shops. Some of these offer creative possibilities!

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/22/bearskin-cake-of-death-warriors/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/back-to-basics-toy-soldiers/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/more-diy-gaming-figure-making/

The silicon cake decoration moulds around online now prove pretty handy for a range of gaming figures or tokens – from guardsmen to nativity shepherds and cowboys and Indians, lots of polymer clay and gaming play possibilities.   If you like your figures on the cartoon, game token or ‘toy soldier’ side …

Defend the Cake Tin!

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, July 2016

 

Peter Laing WW2 figures

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I only bought these four sample 15mm World War Two figures from Peter Laing back in the 1980s and now wish I had bought more.

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Peter’s range was very limited, British and German infantry and some American infantry which I never bought.

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Peter Laing WW2 British Infantry Rifleman advancing F2001 and Bren Gunner F2004, German infantry machine gunner F2016 and 50mm light mortar man F2017  (Photo / figures: Man of TIN)

These Peter Laing metal 15mm figures had to compete for my limited pocket money with the burgeoning and cheaper 20mm plastic figure scene (Matchbox, Esci, Atlantic, erratic Airfix) in the 1980s. I wish now that I had chosen differently, although my love of cheap plastic figures still extends to Vintage Airfix, Britain’s Deetail (not so cheap), Atlantic Wild West figures and pirated / pound store plastic warriors.

Luckily I am now collecting and painting my way towards Peter Laing WW2 infantry tiny skirmish games “at platoon level … To give a most satisfactory infantry action game” as Peter Laing describes it in his catalogue.

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Peter Laing 15mm WW2 British Infantry Ammo Carrier (F2006)

I have been lucky enough to spot some distinctive Peter Laing WW1 and WW2 figures in job lots of other 15mm figures recently.

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Peter Laing WW1 Stretcher bearers (A743)
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Peter Laing’s charming and spirited WW1 British Despatch Rider (A742)
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Peter Laing WW2 British Infantry Rifleman advancing, painted and unpainted castings (F2001)
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Peter Laing WW1 British Infantry sappers and shovels SH (Steel Helmets) digging (A744?)
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Bolstering my Peter Laing WW2 German army platoon with WW1 German steel helmet figures: WW1 German Infantry with rifle advancing F743, WW1 German Officer with pistol F744, WW1 German with stick grenade F745.
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WW1 British Sapper A744, British kneeling gunner with shell in Steel Helmet A718 , WW2 British infantryman Ammo Carrier. Cheap plastic gun from a job lot bag. Bit big for my platoon level game rules!  (Figures / photo: Man of TIN)
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Peter Laing WW2 British Infantry Ammo Carrier (F2006) and WW2 British 2 inch  mortar man (F2005)
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Peter Laing WW2 British Infantryman Ammo Carrier F2006 and WW1 British kneeling gunner with Steel Helmet A718. Simple plastic artillery game piece from long forgotten board game makes good little field gun or anti-tank gun.

As far as WW2 rules go, I have always opted for bits from Donald Featherstone / Lionel Tarr’s simplest WW2 rules in Featherstone’s 1962 book War Games. I look forward to a “mash up” with his Featherstone’s Close Wars Rules appendix to War Games. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

As Peter Laing didn’t make vehicles for WW2, I intend using the troops as he intended “at Platoon level” wood field and forest bocage bolt action and bayonet game version on suitably cluttered terrain hex boards of my usual Little Close Wars games.

The bulk of the WW1 Peter Laing Germans in my collection are wearing Steel Helmets and carrying rifles, so will easily suit. A couple of Peter Laing WW1 maxim guns F746 and loader gunners  F747 will pass muster for German Machine Gunners with Steel Helmets.

These rules for natives versus troops will require a little  alteration to incorporate machine guns, light mortars, small field guns and motor cycles! No natives but plenty of awkward terrain and no vehicles. Still an infantry slog!

The various WW1, native  and late Colonial figures I have would also make an interesting African campaign:

” Few collectors seem interested in World War 1 , although there is much of value to be found in the battles of 1914 and 1915, before the war bogged down in a mass of trench warfare – a fascinating little campaign can be made of the German East Africa fighting in which natives can be used.” Donald Featherstone, War Games (1962) , p. 20.

These figures came with a small online job-lot  of what may be Peter Pig 15mm WW2 figures, some of which are similar in style and scale to Peter Laing figures. There are a number of peaked cap officers, some French resistance ladies and some paratroops with bikes to add some variety. It may be possible to mix a few of these in as needed with the Peter Laing figures. Peter Laing purists, look away now!

I even have a few surviving unmade card sheets of John Mitchell’s card buildings to make up to match Peter Laing’s catalogue suggestion that “these items can be used in conjunction with John Mitchell’s building sheets … to give a most satisfactory infantry action game.”

A lovely couple of posts on the  Tims Tanks blog about meeting with Peter Laing and showing some of his WW1 / WW 2 range.  I too found Peter Laing was always very helpful, encouraging and efficient dealing with young gamers with small pocket money orders by post. Often Peter included a free sample figure or two from his new ranges to offset breakages and postage costs – and no doubt to tempt more purchases.  Smart marketing!

http://timstanks.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/peter-laing-15mm-miniatures.html

http://timstanks.blogspot.co.uk/2015/07/peter-laing-15mm-miniatures.html

Note some  interesting post blog comments (June 2016) that the elusive Peter Laing moulds may have turned up in the collections of the late John Mitchell with many Peter Laing figure fans interested in re-establishing these ranges. Me too!

But which ones would you produce or buy first?

Blogposted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, July 2016.

Father’s Day RAF Firefighter

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This Father’s Day gift this year has a double significance.

My late father had a small and much loved collection of lead toy figures during the Second World War.

Somehow these figures did not survive the war, given up for the war effort or passed on to other children. I can’t recall how they vanished but I kept a look out for suitable lead toy soldiers for him as possible birthday presents.

My grandfather was a professional driver and later chauffeur  and probably handyman / gardener to one of the directors of  a prosperous southern English building firm. My grandfather was given some lead toys to pass on to his little boy such as a 1930s coronation coach that had carelessly been dropped by his employer’s children into the garden pond.

This driver grandfather went on to serve in the  RAF, driving airfield vehicles such as petrol bowsers throughout the bombing of airfields during the Second World War.

My father as a wartime child in his Morrison shelter played with a plaster and lead barrage balloon toy, hoisting it up through the mesh sides. (William Britain’s made such a toy). He also had a small plane carved out of aircraft crash turret Perspex, long since lost.

I recall my father talking about a boxed set of Britain’s RAF firefighters that he was given amongst his lost legions, but never  found such a replacement figure for him as a present.

The choice makes sense with his father’s RAF ground crew wartime experiences,  who would have seen these RAF firefighters in their protective Asbestos Bestobell Suits.

Maybe these strange figures  were all that was available when the supply of toys became scarce as companies including Britain’s turned their factories over to war production.  I think he also had some Britain’s peaked cap khaki infantry firing.

Apparently this Britain’s Firefighters of the Royal Air Force set no. 1758 of 8 figures (or 2 in larger display set 2011) was only produced for a short while, introduced circa 1939 /1940 to 1941, which explains why it took too long to track one down.

I wonder if my interest in toy soldiers, replaced by plastic by the time I was born, came from my father’s lost legions?

Dad was always keen when I was small to join in toy figure games on the floor, garden or tabletop. Later he encouraged my collecting of yet more  Airfix or other plastic figures with the gift of history, modelling or gaming magazines; I’m sure he enjoyed reading the history articles on the train home.

He had many stories to share from his National Service years in the British Army, which I will save for another figure and another blogpost.

That was the history of my family in toy soldiers part 1.

Posted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, June / July 2016.