Man of TIN Advent Calendar Day 10 – The Boys to Entertain You or Broken Britains rearmed

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“Meet the gang, for the boys are here, the boys to entertain you …”

That was the  familiar opening to the 70s WW2 Jungle sitcom by David Croft and Jimmy Perry,  It Ain’t Half Hot Mum, stalwart of my childhood along with their other sitcoms such as Dad’s Army.

This group of Broken Britain’s have the look of  a dodgy ENSA show or music hall chorus line, cheap comics in a strange troops revue.

Seen from another angle, they are more Broken Britain’s – East Kent Regiment in Khaki on guard –  from a donation by John Forman, all broken  figures that would otherwise probably be scrapped.

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The East Kent Regiment based and rearmed, defending my stylishly camouflaged gun emplacement.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/10/14/from-old-digital-radio-to-54mm-houses-and-coastal-gun-emplacement/

There were seven types of Broken Britain’s infantry in the group kindly donated by John Forman, variously missing feet and bases and all missing rifles.

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1. Britain’s Guardsmen firing – six classic figures with broken rifles – not sure which Guards Regiment, as they were play-bashed enough to have no obvious plume colours.

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The figures as they arrived from John Forman.

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Rifles repaired, busby repainted and figures tuppeny based, otherwise I have kept the patina of battered body and face paint.

2. Britain’s Line Infantry (spiked helmet in black home service  with black facings firing  rifle – Royal Irish Regiment set 156, wearing gaiters – 1 figure.

3. Britain’s Line Infantry (spiked helmet white foreign service) with yellow facings  on guard with rifle – Worcester Regiment set 18 c. 1930,  wearing gaiters – 1 figure.

4. Britain’s East Kent Regiment on Guard, The Buffs Set 16 – yellow facings,  second version with square base, on Guard. Produced 1910 – 1930, wearing gaiters – 2 figures.

5. Britain’s  East Kent Regiment on Guard, service dress set 326a produced postwar in Steel Helmets (my “boys to entertain you”, above) – 5 figures.

6. Gloucester Regiment (Boer War) firing, produced 1901 to 1941 – 3 figures

7. The 3 charging Highlanders seen in a previous blog post

East Kent Regiment in Khaki Service Dress 

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They have rifles missing as well as feet or base missing, so replacement bases are required, easily made from Fimo polymer clay to suit tuppeny 2p coin bases.

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Rifles repaired, feet made from cocktail sticks glued into Fimo polymer clay bases. Third figure   East Kent Regiment in Khaki service dress  and fourth, Gloucester Regiment firing.

The rifle repairs are more fiddly, requiring drilling a hole with a 1mm pin vice or hand drill into the broken section. If this is a stubby section of broken rifle this is quite tricky, whereas it is much easier to drill into the hand section where it grips the rifle, which has a greater thickness of lead.

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Drilling into the rifle hand of another of John Forman’s damaged Britain’s Guards riflemen..

So finally  how did the ENSA “boys to entertain you” turn out in the end?

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My Boys to Entertain You (and Mr Hitler) from the Britain’s East Kent Regiment …just a little work to do on tidying and painting the Fimo and tuppenny bases.

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And for a suitable ear worm … the theme song to It Ain’t Half Hot Mum. Whilst the services / Seventies humour might have dated and the Indian characters would be handled differently today, as a child and still today, to me Windsor Davies is every bit the archetypal comic Sergeant Major to his “Lovely Boys”.

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN on Advent Calendar Day 10, 10th December 2018.

 

 

TSAF Aircraft Repaint Part 1

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First undercoat paint layers on these planes  and recently repaired Crescent pilot with flight plans, repaired with new feet.

Like many bloggers, with the current heatwave I have done little figure painting this week.

However I  have started repainting or undercoating  the first two of the three Moshi aircraft.

Interwar Silver has replaced pink, whilst Desert brown with a silver belly has replaced the orange and red.

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They started out like this in pink and orange. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/07/06/tsaf-toy-soldier-air-force/

The eye and shark teeth decals are worth keeping on the desert brown aircraft. Eventually a darker  brown camo disruption pattern will be overpainted, to get the look of a Curtiss Tomahawk.

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Several more coats of paint, some Imagi-Nations decals and a finish with Gloss varnish are all required before these aircraft are game and garden ready. Once it cools down …

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN 26 July 2018

TSAF Pink Wing Scramble!

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In a lonely forest airstrip, the radio message crackles Through – “Pink Wing,  Scramble!”

Two pilots run to their waiting machine  …

A couple of missed photographs from my previous TSAF blogpost https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/07/06/tsaf-toy-soldier-air-force/

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Two fabulous vintage  Johillco (1939 era) Running  Pilot hollowcast figures, one in Khaki, the other in civilian white pilot or technicians overalls run to “Poppet” their waiting Hybrid Corsair / Hellcat / Buffalo.

I have now tracked down for a fiver a third Moshi Monster aeroplane. This one will be converted in time to a string bag biplane. Up Up and Away!

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 9 July 2018.

Airfix Gold from the back of a dark gaming shop

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A bit like finding Smaug the dragon seated on gold and jewels  in The Hobbit, I found these treasures lurking in the dark back of a gaming shop last month.

I often pop into gaming, railway or model shops when I see them in search of scenery, paint or just out of curiousity.

Gaming shops are often strange places, darker towards the back and occupied by shuffling figures, all dressed in black. Then there’s the mumbling, arcane words about the miniatures games or card systems arrayed on tables. Foreign territory. No eye contact is usually made with strangers in civilian clothing such as me.

(For the record, I have nothing against fantasy gamers and suchlike).

It was quite dreamlike, finding a cache of kits and figures that you had been looking out for for years.

Any second  I knew I was going to wake up.

There was a small shelf of kits, vintage Matchbox kits,  multipose historical Airfix single figures, things I had not seen for years.

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I had little cash on me  and little time to stop and recce.

I went straight for the vintage Airfix figures, things I knew I could use rather than stockpile.

Familiar old Airfix OO/HO Waterloo French and British infantry (reasonable at about £6 per sealed box) were one obvious and versatile choice – these partly made up for the odd lack of British Infantry in their box in my last hoard.

They turned out to be the recent 2000s Airfix reissues in bright red and blue but no matter.

The Hat British Rifles or Light Infantry are new figures to me.

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Some interesting information on the box back about the Light Infantry, suggesting  alternative uses such as Cazadores and Cacadores.

 

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A quick history lesson on the back of a box …

 

Who could resist the odd brown unit of Cacadores or US 1812 Infantry, like those pictured in Preben Kannik’s Military History of the World in Colour ?

 

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These oddly shakoed Hat figures would pass (for me for games purposes) for 1840s British Infantry or Militia in a railway-related scenario that I am working on.

I also spotted their potential as British or US Infantry in a War of 1812 skirmish scenario that I am working on for 2018 with the Waterloo British Infantry.

There was only one lone  box of 1:32 figures to choose from but a good choice – Call to Arms 54mm Zulus – something Airfix strangely never made, despite the popularity of the 1960s ZULU films.

They should match in well with my repaired hollow cast zulus. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/02/17/ashantees-or-zulus-reborn/

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Sixteen 1:32 Zulus, four each of the four poses

 

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Another quick history lesson …

 

By luck I have a pack of the Call to Arms 1:32 Rorke’s Drift British Infantry to match them, bought several years ago.

I went back to the gaming shop a week or two ago.

The mumbling black clad figures and the private gaming were still there.  None of the other  vintage material was there. The shop assistant had no knowledge of it.  All the remaining kits were gone. Maybe it had been a dream after all …

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 20 September 2017