More Cereal Killers?

After posting pictures of my non April Fools cereal based gaming figures, I was reminded of Kellogg’s again by Alan Tradgardmastre Gruber’s spirited conversions of Crescent figures.

http://tradgardland.blogspot.com/2020/04/simple-conversions.html

http://tradgardland.blogspot.com/2020/04/simple-conversions-painted.html

I’m sure some of my Guardsmen came out of cereal packets.

I checked. Amongst the many toy soldiers in my family collection or that have turned up in job lots are these free guardsmen from Kellogg’s cereals in the 1960s.

I vaguely recalled that our family collection of cereal figures received firing, shooting and bayoneting guardsmen.

Looking through the bases of my tatty collection, it appears that the guardsmen with rifles are Crescent toy soldiers from the late 1950s to 1960s and the Bandsmen are both Crescent and Kellogg’s.

Crescent were not around for sale in the toy shops when I was young with pocket money in the 1970s, whereas Britain’s Herald and Deetail delightfully were.

The Kellogg’s freebie by Crescent is the second from the left, the others Crescent plastic ones.

Bandsmen – Not quite the “cereal killers” I remember!

Crescent appear to have manufactured exact unpainted copies of their bandsmen for Kellogg’s, c. 1958 dated according to the CerealOffers website.

Kellogg’s bandsmen – part of my childhood parades …

I found these fine bandsmen shown online with original box backs and adverts whilst spending happy hours last week on the cereal ‘premium’ website http://cerealoffers.com, where I found again the cardboard Asterix figures and Weetabix scenes of my childhood.

“FREE IN THIS PACKET at the bottom of the inner bag” – free toy soldiers in your cornflakes – imagine that today!

Screenshot image of the fabulous CerealOffers Premiums website – Kellogg’s Guardsman page.

For example this box back and screenshot of the figures is interesting, as it picks up on the earlier ceremonial craze of the 1953 Coronation when lead soldiers were still around. By 1958 / the early 1960s “Unbreakable” coloured plastic “smart as paint” was taking over for many Toy Soldier manufacturers as hollowcast lead was phased out.

Worth looking at the whole Kelloggs Guardsman page on CerealOffers page for further atmospheric adverts.http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Cornflakes/1950s/Model_Guards_Bandsmen/model_guards_bandsmen.html

Being late 1950s they remind me of the first offerings of Airfix tiny small scale OO/HO Guards Band and Guards Colour Party. A curious choice in many ways, these first few early Airfix figures but mirroring maybe part of that shift from lead figures into plastic ones in profitable, established or traditional themes of toy soldiers, farms, zoos, railways, cowboys, civilians and then military topics.

1959/60 Guards Band http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=530

1959/60 Guards Colour Party http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=24

Deadliest Cereal Killers?

“He’ll lead your toy soldiers in and out of battle, on the parade ground, in processions …”

All very well for parades, pomp and processions but maybe the deadliest Kellogg’s “cereal killers” would have to be one of these sets:

1960s Kellogg’s / Crescent Robin Hood Set? http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Cornflakes/1960s/Robin_Hood_Figures/robin_hood_figures.html

or the Knights in Armour?

http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Rice_Krispies/1950s/Knights_in_Armour/knights_in_armour.html

And the Cowboys and Indians here?

Cowboys http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Frosties/1950s/Cowboys_of_the_West/cowboys_of_the_west.html

Indians http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Frosties/1950s/Indian_Warriors/indian_warriors.html

All in all, some very familiar Crescent figures – free. What a delight to get these in your cereals!

Not forgetting Warriors through the Ages: http://cerealoffers.com/Kelloggs/Variations/Puffa_Puffa_Rice/Warriors_Through_The_Ages/warriors_through_the_ages.html

Hugh at Small Scale World has a blog post on these Cereal Guardsmen:

http://smallscaleworld.blogspot.com/2012/07/b-is-for-best-of-british-bandsmen.html

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 3 April 2020.

Paperboy Martians Have Landed on my Doormat

They’re here!

Man of TIN, scouts and my own Cath Kidston cut out paper Guards greet the Paperboys arrival.

At last! They’re here at last! Huzzah! Or Ulla?

They’re all utterly gorgeous. You have to buy a copy or two!

Somewhere in paper soldier Valhalla, the late and much missed Stuart Asquith is smiling.

My favourite of all pages are the Civilians. As lively and full of character as Tintin or the work of Raymond Briggs like Ethel and Ernest. I hope Peter Dennis takes that as a complement!

But, crowding round my copy as I opened it, fresh from Helion thought the post, a gasp went up from the tiny men (and women) – “Where were the Boy Scouts and the Girl Scouts?”

In times of peril such as Martian or Franco / Prussian invasion, England expects everyone to step up and be counted – Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts too!

Hopefully in time Peter Dennis will amend this omission and put some Edwardian Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts on his Paperboys Little Wars website page, if only to keep an eye on the Prussians there!

https://m.facebook.com/pg/thePaperboysPage/posts/

https://peterspaperboys.com/collections/little-wars

Hint: Peter, there’s plenty of early scout uniform details, if you want on my Scouting Wide Games for the Tabletop website blog and Man of TIN blog:

https://tabletopscoutingwidegames.wordpress.com

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/04/27/easter-eggs-wide-games-and-the-cloak-of-romance/

Early ‘Paperboys’!? Some of my Edwardian scraps of Scouts (probably printed in Germany)

Surrey scouts c. WW1 Copyright: my Scoutingwidegames for the Tabletop photo collection.

Making my Paperboys up might have to wait!

Probably until after I have to finish working with Alan ‘Tradgardland’ Gruber on our 54mm Scouting Wide Games and Snowball Fight offerings for the Little Wars Revisited 54mm gaming day.

This takes place on Saturday March 14th 2020 in Martian invaded Woking, no less! (still spaces available) see here for details –

https://littlewarsrevisited.boards.net/thread/404/lwr-forum-games-day-2020

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN (not Boy of PAPER) 21 February 2020

Packing Sugar at Freddie! Snowball Fight Wide Games Scenario

Crossposted from my Tabletop Scouting Wide Games blog:

https://tabletopscoutingwidegames.wordpress.com/2019/10/29/packing-sugar-at-freddy-street-gang-snowball-fight-scenario-write-up/

Figures here:

https://tabletopscoutingwidegames.wordpress.com/2019/10/28/good-grief-more-snow-forts-snowball-fight-figures-for-scouting-wide-games/

Resin Christmas Village snowballing 54 to 60mm figures from Lemax:

https://tabletopscoutingwidegames.wordpress.com/2019/10/28/good-grief-more-snow-forts-snowball-fight-figures-for-scouting-wide-games/

Blog posted by Mark, (snow) Man of TIN, 29 October 2019.

On the Repair Desk

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A varied selection of broken figures. 

Here are some more bashed and broken 54mm lead hollowcast figures that are on the repair bench.

A real mix from various manufacturers – some tribal warriors, Britain’s native Indian warriors on guard, a Robin Hood archer, a Hilco spaceman, an Eskimo and Assyrians …

The Timpo Eskimo will make a fine WW1 pilot.

They are sharing the painting desk with some Peter Laing 7th Cavalry figure recruits from the Duchy of Tradgardland.

Blog posted by Mark, Man of TIN, 16 September 2018.

Skeletons, Sir, Farsunds of ‘Em!

Don’t shoot until you see the dark sockets of their eyes!

Crossposted from my other blog, Pound Store Plastic Warriors

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2018/09/08/pound-bag-skeleton-warriors-1-a-bag/

Blog posted by Mark, Man of TIN, for Pound Store Plastic Warriors, 8 September 2018.

Timpo Desert Fort pictures

Using my blog as a scrapbook (kind of what Pinterest was invented for), here are a couple of cheeky screen shots from an online auction site of the Timpo Desert Fort.

Never had this fort or knew it existed. However I still have my childhood Timpo Arabs and Foreign Legion, some of them in need of repair from brittle joints.

I have been slowly collecting the odd beaten up Timpo cowboy buildings for 54mm games.

There are lots more Timpo buildings at this site for some Timpo Nostalgia:

http://www.spanglefish.com/hallmarkstoysoldiers/index.asp?pageid=169845

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 29 August 2018.

TSAF Aircraft Repaint Part 1

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First undercoat paint layers on these planes  and recently repaired Crescent pilot with flight plans, repaired with new feet.

Like many bloggers, with the current heatwave I have done little figure painting this week.

However I  have started repainting or undercoating  the first two of the three Moshi aircraft.

Interwar Silver has replaced pink, whilst Desert brown with a silver belly has replaced the orange and red.

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They started out like this in pink and orange. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/07/06/tsaf-toy-soldier-air-force/

The eye and shark teeth decals are worth keeping on the desert brown aircraft. Eventually a darker  brown camo disruption pattern will be overpainted, to get the look of a Curtiss Tomahawk.

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Several more coats of paint, some Imagi-Nations decals and a finish with Gloss varnish are all required before these aircraft are game and garden ready. Once it cools down …

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN 26 July 2018

Wilko Wild Western Express Train

In between planning airplane conversions, I have been repairing Broken Britain’s hollowcast 54mm Indians and casting more Prince August 40mm Cowboys and Indians ready for some garden skirmish games soon.

So adding a Western train set isn’t so surprising …

Vintage 54mm Pound Store Plastic Cowboys and Indians fight over the cargo and caboose of my new Wilko Western Express train.

A snip of a plastic battery operated railway set at £10. Read more at:

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2018/07/14/the-wild-wilko-western-express/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN on 14 / 15 July 2018.

TSAF Toy Soldier Air Force

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Thanks to the quickly passed plastic  craze of Moshi Monsters, I have now acquired two interesting hybrid fighter bombers. Perfect for any Imagi-Nations Air forces.

They were sourced through my family for free or a few pounds online. They are roughly suitable for 54mm or 1:32 figures, arguably the only true scale for H.G. Wells Big “Little Wars”.

This was how they arrived, in their original Moshi Monster Super Moshi character forms of Katsuma and Poppet, little Heli Moshi Monster  which cleverly transforms into part of the propellor and engine.

These planes are hybrids, garishly coloured with their  pink countershading (female Super Moshi Poppet character) and orange paint scheme (Male cat Super Moshi character Katzuma). I recognise bits of different WW2 aircraft moshed, morphed or mashed together to make this generic hybrid.

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Those Super Moshi hybrid aeroplanes in a screen shot of the Super Moshi music video (c/o Youtube / moshimonsters.com)

I especially like the orange bulbous nosed “Shark Teeth” fighter, originally belonging to SuperMoshi Katsuma.

Light machine gun armament  from a pound store / Tim Mee type modern toy plastic soldier in Blue Army uniform.

How our wartime photographer pictured these magnificent men …

I looked through a cheap modern reprint of another old childhood branch library  Blandford favourite, Fighters 1939-1945 by Kenneth Munson, to see if I could find the Moshi Monster plane’s forebears.

Grumman Hellcat? Tomahawk with the shark teeth motif? Bulbous Brewster Buffalo, one of my odder childhood aircraft models?

My naval grandfather may have recognised the type. He served on various Royal Navy aircraft carriers during the Pacific /  SE Asia naval campaigns including the Kamikaze raids on carriers.

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Small snaps in my Royal Navy grandad’s WW2 album that may have been taken by him or the ship’s photographer. Stamped on the Reverse by Censor: “Not Suitable for Transmission Through The Post”.  Written on the back – “Corsair Fighter” (bottom left)  and top left “Port Suez”  with aircraft wings stowed. Note RAF Roundels. 

His photo album shows similar carrier based planes but with fold up wings to stow neatly above and  below decks.

The shark teeth and eye motif of the Curtis P40 Tomahawk

I would be surprised if you recognised the pilot of the orange aircraft but you might have seen part of him on the blog a few months back amongst the metal detectorist’s toy soldier finds.

Here is how he looks now with a charming Dorset Soldiers recast Pilot head. A hint of Dastardly and Muttly here? Maybe a bullet-holed flying scarf might be required.

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Here is how he appeared amongst the toy soldier finds:

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Third from top left, our pilot’s arms and body. Bottom right, this fragment is also a pilot figure, not yet fully restored.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/recalled-to-the-colours-54mm-metal-detectorists-toy-soldier-finds-restored-to-fighting-condition

Some Ground Crew

The  Johillco running pilots in civilian or technician white flying overalls and also khaki flight suits will eventually be joined by some ground crew. Somewhere I have a mould to homecast more RAF Regiment ground crew and also a Britain’s WAAF amongst others to add to the Toy Soldier Air Force at some point.

Army Red and Army Blue will get one plane each, after some removal of some stickers (the shark teeth, eye and katsuma stickers will stay!) There will also be some paint  adjustments to their desert orange or desert pink camouflage schemes, such as lighter bellies as part of aircraft countershading.

Johillco running Pilot, Britain’s RAF fire crew, modern metal  Britain’s British and US Navy crew (D-Day 1944 commemorative set?), Johillco air crew in donkey jacket, Home cast RAF Regiment, Britain’s RAF Regiment, Johillco running Pilot.
Rear view of the Air Force and Navy figures including handy slung tin hat on the sixth Home-cast figure, who can also be painted a# Home Guard or Army in Khaki.

Interestingly these navy and aircrew figures link into both sides of my family with a Naval grandfather who served on aircraft carriers and an RAF ground crew Grandfather, both of whom had passed away before I was born.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/20/fathers-day-raf-firefighter/

Not quite sure how these aircraft will fit into the 54mm outdoor or indoor games. Defending the airbase will be one scenario.  I currently have no rules for aircraft, but I’m sure F.E. Perry’s First and Second Book of Wargaming and Featherstone’s Air Wargames Books may have some clues. Not quite sure what sort of ground spike or stand will be needed yet for a mix of garden and floor / tabletop use.

Little Air Wars?

If I encounter another Moshi aeroplane at good price, the next one gets turned into a “string bag” Biplane, even more suitable for H.G. Wells Edwardian / WW1  era  Little Wars. He missed including military biplanes in Little Wars by a few years.

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One very “Happy Meal” at Macdonalds when The Peanuts Movie came out …

Meanwhile the Aerial Menace of my floor and garden is added to by my favourite (toy) pilot of all time – well worth watching the recent Peanuts movie for the dogfight scenes against the Red Baron.

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A dubious ground crew on this surprising ESCI product, an Italian company not just good for plastic toy soldiers.

Some great 1983 packaging too!

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Love the  machine gun hole damage to the fuselage! Good Grief!

Chocks Away! Bandits at 5 o’clock! Tally Ho! Blam blam blam etc.

and finally … here is the original Super Moshi March music video on YouTube.An

Blog posted by Mark, Man of TIN 6 July 2018.

Lost Highlanders Rearmed

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I have been steadily working through some of the remaining damaged figures found and sold to me  by a metal detectorist, including three legless and headless Highlanders.

Previous restorations and the original state of the figures can be seen at: https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/recalled-to-the-colours-54mm-metal-detectorists-toy-soldier-finds-restored-to-fighting-condition

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Some of the last figures to repair – three kilted Highlanders and an odd Redcoated torso.

The surviving paintwork suggested that two of the Highlanders were Khaki colonials, the other two were a Redcoat Highlander lying firing made by Johillco and a headless Redcoat torso.

Matchstick legs were inserted into the body through the leg holes and then shaved to a more round shape with a scalpel. Masking tape was then wound round to thicken the leg up to a suitable width.

Suitable heads were mostly found in my homecast 54mm Prince August spares box.

Luckily with two of the figures, the Johillco lying firing Highlander and the Khaki Britain’s standing firing figure,  I had battered original figures with which  to compare the headless, legless torsos.

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Johillco Highlanders – at back the figure being restored, matchstick legs and wire rifle, prior to adding masking tape. At the front an original figure having the missing rifle replaced. Good for clues to paintwork.

The Highlanders had puggrees or wound strips of cloth around their pith helmets, so these were simply added with several fine thin strips of masking tape. The same technique was used to build up the sock strips on the legs.

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A puggaree, puggree, puggry or puggary (from a Hindi word ) is a strip of cloth wound around the upper portion of a hat or helmet, particularly a pith helmet, and falling down behind to act as a shade for the back of the neck.

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Fimo polymer clay feet were required to finish off the legs, modelled on a Britains Khaki firing British infantryman with feet pointing outwards.

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One of the Khaki Highlanders lying firing acquired a WW2 tin hat and arm with binoculars, both recast spares from Dorset Soldiers. An added pistol in a holster from Airfix Multipose spares should suggest an officer’s side arm. A spare right arm had to be built up with wire and masking tape.

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This quirky figure should fit well with many World War Two scenarios and match those kilted Matchbox British Eighth Army Khaki Highlander and Piper 54mm figures in kilts or shorts and Tam O’ Shanter berets. http://www.airfixtoysoldiers.com/Matchbox%20sets.htm

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The standing firing Highlander also needed a small hole drilled into the missing arm stump with 0.9mm hand drill, a wire arm or armature added (secured with superglue) and built up with masking tape. Glue and paint stiffened and secured the masking tape, stopping it from unravelling.

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The restored figure (right) is not an exact match of the original Britain’s figure in my collection (shown on the left)  but it gave a rough idea of what to aim at.

This figure was easier to do because of the lucky fact that I had a battered Britain’s  original Khaki Highlander standing firing figure in my collection to compare it with. This standing firing original figure also needed repair of a broken rifle, so I did that as well.

The looser repaired arms lack the neat slender precision of the original Britain’s limbs but provide character one-off  figures. The repaired figures here remind me a little of the looser limbed but spirited poses of Heyde of Germany and Lucotte or Mignot figures of France.

Milliput might be easier for sculpting but I cannot use this due to a family / household allergy, so  I used what I safely had to hand.  I could have ordered and waited for further Dorset Soldier recast Britain’s heads, but impatiently used what Dorset heads or Prince August heads I had in my spares box, even though Prince August 54mm figure heads are a little bigger and heftier than Britain’s original or recast ones. It adds to the toy soldierness of the figures anyhow.

The final non Highland figure was the redcoated torso.

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Prince August head, armature arm and rifle, matchstick legs …

This was the trickiest figure, the Redcoated  torso,  as  I was not sure who the maker was or what the original figure looked like. It had the chunky, slightly oversized look of an early Britain’s Fusilier but having no other fusiliers in my armies,  I chose instead found a suitable Prince August line infantry spiked helmet. This would more closely match my other  line infantry figures. The legs and base were easy enough to make out of matchsticks, masking tape and the usual Fimo feet and base to fit a tuppeny base for stability.

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The near-finished slightly clunky figure. 

The right arm was half missing, so I drilled a small hole to insert a bent wire armature that would be both an arm and shouldered rifle all in one piece. Not the usual rifle position for marching or sloping  arms, but it kind of works.

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A few more useful finishing touches – NCO stripes, maybe some medals – should complete this tiny lead Frankenstein figure.

A satisfying few evenings’ work, mixed in with other figure repair work in progress on more Broken Britain’s, some more Zulus etc to feature in future blog posts.

Hopefully these once lost and battered figures are as bright and proud, as fighting fit as the day they were cast, painted and bought home from a toy shop in a red box. As shiny again as they once were before their curious fate to be bashed, buried and eventually found again over many years by a metal detectorist called Frank in the Southeast of England.

I have based them on tuppeny pieces and made them stout repairs to arms, legs and rifles, stocky rather than thin and elegant,  as these figures will eventually will fight once more in gardens and on tabletops. Huzzah!

You might also be interested in my previous blog posts over the last few weeks about other toy soldier repairs.

Just two more tricky figures left from the figure part of the original haul, the headless driver figure who will become a pilot and a half a body figure in longcoat and gauntlets – possibly originally a pilot?

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN on 11  January 2018.