Verda versus Griza FMS 20mm Pound Store Plastic Warriors skirmish now with added Esperanto!

Scene / seen from the Verdan border post, the attacking Grizan troops in grey

Cross posted from my sister blog Pound Store Plastic Warriors,

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2020/06/28/verda-versus-griza-pound-store-plastic-soldiers-20mm-interbellum-fms-skirmish-now-with-added-esperanto/

Now with added Esperanto and a Blog Post Script on US army 1960s training using Esperanto as the enemy language

Gold in them there forested hills of Gondal?

Northwest Gondal, 1870s

Rumours have reached the Redcoats at Fort MacGuffin that a gang of illegal loggers and miners are back in the hills to the NW edge of the Northern Forests. From time to time, rumours of past gold finds and limitless timber have lured landless settlers and gangs to try their luck.

Usually a Hunting Party of Forest Indians deal with any threats to their Hunting Grounds and Sacred Forests.

Redcoat patrols in the forest are warned to watch out for trouble. What will happen?

Turn 1

A small gang of armed miners is glimpsed at the entrance to the old mine, pulling down the boards that close it off.

D6 thrown to see at which turn or when next two parties of miners (Turn 4 and 9) and the next two Forest Indian Hunting Parties of five each arrive at Turn 6 and 7.

The Redcoat patrol of nine will emerge on the board and road to the south of the mine at Turn 11. Two d6 were thrown to determine how many redcoats are on patrol.

A Forest Indian Hunting Party emerges from the Northwest following a scrub turkeyfowl. They spot the Miners and some felled trees. This must be stopped! Where there are a few Miners, more follow.

The Forest Indians decide to scare the Miners off with some up close rifle fire.

Do the Miners post a lookout? D6 yes 1,2,3 – no 4,5,6.

Do the Miners see the Indians moving in the forest before the Indians fire? D6 Yes 1,2 No 3,4,5,6 – at this point Turn 1 and 2 the Indians are not seen approaching.

By Turn 3, the Miners do notice the Indians approaching. They are all out of range.

The first Hunting Party of Forest Indians uses cover to get closer to the miners.

By Turn Four and Five, firing has begun.

By Turn Six, the Melee between the Miner with the Pike and the Indian Braves sees the Miner and one Brave killed.

Photo: Turn Four, To the North a second Party of miners appears, weapons drawn.

Turn 8 – One of the first Hunting Party is in melee with the Miners’ Lookout, who is killed.
A higher bird’s eye view of the second Forest Indian Hunting Party advancing using cover of trees

Turn 9 – the final small group of miners appear on the track, south of the mine. Several Forest Indians and Miners are in melee.

Turn 10 – more Close Range firing does not lead to a mass of casualties due to some poor dice throws when firing and lucky Casualty Savings Throws.

Turn 11 A patrol of Redcoats appears on the path, south of the mine.

.

At this stage with three groups on the table, I chose what would happen next from six options for a d6 dice throw.

1 – Miners fire on Redcoats

2 – Miners try to ally with Redcoats against Forest Indians

3 – Redcoats ally with Indians against Miners

4 – Redcoats fire in Forest Indians

5 – Forest Indians retreat away into the trees

6 – Indians fire on Redcoats

The outcome this time is Number Four, that the Forest Indians retreat whilst firing and being fired upon by the Miners.

.

Turn 12 – time to leave?

The Indians departing and Redcoats arriving, the Miners throw a d6 to see if they stay to fight (1-3) and be caught or retreat (4-6). They wisely throw a retreat dice number, leaving their equipment behind.

Turn 12 As the Redcoat patrol advances, Miners hurriedly exit north and the Forest Indians disappear into the trees.

The Valhalla Queue – seven miners and a Hunting Party of five Forest Indians.

The fortunate Turkey watches the Redcoats load up and wheel away the Miners’ cart. It lives to gobble another day!

Before they departed, the Redcoats hastily used the gunpowder and explosives they found at the site to blow up the entrance to this troublesome mine good and proper, once and for all. If they can’t carry back all the Miners’ supplies on the cart, they will be buried for later or blown up in the mine entrance. No sense leaving it all for more Miners or the Forest Indians to find.

BOOM!

The fleeing Miners and Forest Indian Hunting Parties far away hear the sound and saw the plume of dust, smoke and rock spouting high above the trees as the Old Mine was sealed shut under a rockfall tumbling onto the Forest Path.

In their colonial policing role, the Redcoat Patrol gather up any dropped weapons and loaded them onto the Miners’ handcart. Removing any identification papers or personal effects that they find, the Redcoats quickly bury the Miners in one area.

That done, they bury the fallen Indians in shallow graves and cairns in another area, to keep them safe from wild beasts, knowing that the Forest Indians would return by nightfall to retrieve their fallen warriors and bury them according to the Forest Indian tradition.

By nightfall, even with the Miners’ Cart, the Redcoat Patrol should be back towards the safety of Fort MacGuffin by dusk.

Photo: The surviving two Hunting Parties of Forest Indians lurk to see what they can scavenge, including this small mystery barrel. Firewater? Explosives? Food?

Who knows what will happen next in the forests of North Gondal?

Conclusion:

An enjoyable short solo skirmish game in cluttered terrain, handling three different groups of characters for once. Hope you enjoyed it too!

I am enjoying the rough continuity of tensions between skirmish episodes amongst the various character groups and their background motivations.

The 54mm figures and terrain used are the following:

  • The Forest Indians are my repaired and repainted mostly Britain’s Hollowcast metal Indians
  • The Redcoats are my paint conversions of Pound Store Plastic copies of WW2 German Infantry
  • The Miners are Replicants plastics ‘Confederate Raiders’ sets, sourced through Steve Weston Toy Soldiers or on his eBay site
  • Trees are Bold Frontiers Australia tree packs.
  • The large dead tree and rocky mine entrance (a plastic pond edge or rockery) from Britain’s farm and garden sets in my childhood collection.
  • Charbens metal cart, repaired
  • Terrain is old fashioned felt pieces over big book hills with ‘logs’ and ‘rocks’ from the garden.

Rules are Close Little Wars scaled down adaptations of a Donald Featherstone ‘Close Wars’ appendix to his War Games (1962), book reprint or ebook copy available from John Curry’s History of Wargaming website.

Movement distances are again generally halved from the Close Wars appendix to reflect the smaller playing space available.

By chance, the Amazon.co.uk page for this book currently features in the sample pages / ‘see inside’ section a view of these Close Wars rules appendix – good choice, as you can see proof that it is a (reprint) book worth buying and reading!

Blog posted by Mark ManofTIN, 11 June 2020.

The Warrior and Pacific August 1901 tiny handwritten magazine

Around the time in 2019 that Charlotte Bronte’s last surviving little book was saved by fundraising to be returned home to Haworth, I was lucky enough to spot this charming little handwritten book online. I bought it and asked its origins but the seller knew little about it, other than his father had picked it up somewhere.

Now The Warrior and Pacific August 1901 issue will be shared with the world to boost its tiny circulation and family readership.

Warrior and Pacific Magazine August 1901 Front Cover – Illustrated by ‘D. Iberville’ – portrait of the Queen Regent?

The Bronte family wrote tiny book parodies of magazines and adverts of their early Nineteenth Century and Victorian times as part of their ImagiNations of Glasstown, Gondal, Angria and Gaaldine. These are housed at the Bronte Parsonage and have inspired my ImagiNations Games for many years.

Jump forward to the end of the Victorian era in 1901.

Entitled the Warrior and Pacific magazine, this tiny postcard sized ‘magazine’ appears to have been hand written and hand drawn around Maidstone in August 1901, possibly by a group of young boys or girls on summer holiday.

Some of the pen names are suitably grand – Montagu Fontenoy, John Fitzgerald, Major Pearl, Dick Iberville, Lady Sagasso …

Queen Victoria had died months earlier, this was written in the first Edwardian summer, August 1901.

Why was it written? It mimics and maybe mocks the thrilling, moralistic, mawkish and dull magazines of the day, based on the small sample that I have read. I have a few such random bound volumes of the Strand, Boys Own Paper and Girls Own Paper, Windsor Magazine etc. which make great Wellsian Little Wars hills.

Page 1 – Maidstone News Cs and B’s

“As the inhabitants of Maidstone seem to have left their native town to its solitary fate, Maidstone news is not flourishing. In fact about the newest thing about Maidstone is its emptiness.

The Creepers have joined the Boswells at Felixstowe where we hope the united forces will spend happy times.

This month saw two little Creepers born. Princess Winifred celebrates her eighth birthday on the twenty ninth and Princess Cecily her fifth on the nineteenth.

We congratulate them and wish them many happy returns on their respective birthdays.

We may expect in the near future to hear something definite about a certain Princess Eloise and a certain Earl Haynaught.”

Portraits of Cecily and Winifred appear on page Seven, alongside ‘Mary’ and a dog Maurice Bernard. The C’s and B’s are presumably the Creeper and Boswell families.

Are these real people?

A quick check on Ancestry and Find My Past on 1901 Census and elsewhere reveals no Winifred or Cecily Creeper born on those dates or at all anywhere, not just in Maidstone, although the Creeper surname does really exist. Similarly there is no R. Springfield in Maidstone but there were several Boswell families living in Maidstone in 1901 and 1911.

The main editor or illustrator appears to be one R. Springfield, ‘Warrior and Pacific, Maidstone.’

Page Ten And Eleven – ‘A Brother’s Revenge’ poem and remedies for sunburn

Page Ten and Eleven – A ‘Brothers Revenge’ and remedies for sunburn in the August issue 1901

Memories – “In the heart are many spots / sacred to Forget-Me-Nots”

Montagu Fontenoy? This may be an unconscious echo of “Lieutenant-General Sir Charles Montagu KB (died 1 August 1777) who was a British Army officer. He was the son of Brigadier-General Edward Montagu, colonel of the 11th Foot and Governor of Hull, nephew of George Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax, and great-nephew to the celebrated minister Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax. He had an elder brother, Edward, who was killed at the Battle of Fontenoy, being lieutenant-colonel of the 31st Foot.” Or maybe just a good made up name?

Some of the portraits look as if they have sketched from magazines and may or may not be based on real people. Captain Earl Haynaught appears to be a made up name (the Earl of Hainault appears in medieval times in Froissart) but his portrait does look like Victorian army officer’s hat.

Other contributors include the grandly named Montagu Fontenoy, Major Pearl, Dick Iberville, Lady Sagasso and illustrator R. Springfield.

Page 2 – Editors Notes

“This is our grand August double seaside number and is generally considered the best paper of the month. We do not think that this year it will fall far below its usual high standard. We have many articles of interest this month that we have not had before and it bids fair to be a good success.”

“There is very extra special superfine, pluperfect competition specially designed for the pupils of Ronde College belonging to the Lower School and we hope to have a great many competitions for it. The prizes offered will be very handsome ones. There will only be two prizes for the two sets which are nearest right.”

Page 3 – ‘Model Mothers to Be – An Improvement on Home Chat Model Mothers’ by Lady Sagasso. An amusing little mock article about a warring celebrity couple and their darling only child that could have been written today …

Home Chat was obviously a style model to follow or mock – to make “an improvement on”. Alfred Harmsworth founded Home Chat which he published through his Amalgamated Press in 1895. The magazine ran until 1959. It was published as a small format magazine which came out weekly. As was usual for such women’s weeklies the formulation was to cover society gossip and domestic tips along with short stories, dress patterns, recipes and competitions. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Chat

Page Four ‘Modern Mothers to Be’ second page and onto Page Five – some boats ‘Seen through Mist’

Illustrators D. Iberville, H. Vaughan, C.U. Boswell, K. Selagein, S. Howard …

“It is an insoluble Chinese puzzle to Maidstone why they ever did it” is a good closing line to ‘Model Mothers to Be’.

Page Six and Seven – Dog breeds, royal portraits of Princess Winifred and Cecily (the Creeper sisters, with Cecily’s Fifth Birthday on the nineteenth, see page 1 Cs and B’s?) ,

Scene or art competitions ‘you have to sketch a scene in pencil or crayon. It may be a landscape, seascape, fire escape or any other scape. Size half this page. Paper provided’. R. Springfield.

Page Seven – Hints on Etiquette …

“When introduced to a complete stranger, there is no need, as a general rule, to shake hands, but to bow.”

“It is now fashionable for a bridegroom to wear lavender suede gloves”

“A gentleman should precede a lady in a crowded street, in order to clear a way for her.”

Page Eight and Nine – Portraits- some great names pencilled in Cedric Alfonso Mabel Creeper Elsie Winnie Daisy?

Page Twelve – ‘My First Attempt at Novel Writing’ a comic article by ‘John Fitzgerald’ – ‘extracts from JF’s novel next month’ – were there more issues of Warrior and Pacific?

Page Thirteen – Nature Competition’ – for the best pressed flower leaf or seaweed “sent to us before September 1st.” [1901]

Page Ten – ‘A Brother’s Revenge’ poem

A Brother’s Revenge by Montagu Fontenoy

Stretched on the ground her lover lies,

With dagger drawn, her brother stands

“My brother, go” she sadly cries

“Oh Philip, hasten from these lands.”

He turns, then mutely kneeling down,

Beside that prostrate form,

With lips compressed, and beating heart,

She ———– his lifeblood warm.

She see the face she dearly loves

Now stamped with death’s grey hue

Grow fainter, fainter as she looks

With loving eyes and true.

One glance, one kiss, one gasp, one tear and all is o’er

She knows that brave heroic heart

Will beat on earth no more.

Then rising quickly from her knees

With a steadfast upward glance

She stoops beside the fallen man

And holds his fatal lance.

“I will not live my life” she cries,

With the passion of despair

Then with one sharp homeward thrust

She lies beside him there.

———–

Stirring stuff!

A variety of article styles are parodied or pastiches from dramatic poems, romantic gothic melodrama stories to nature notes and etiquette observations.

Page Fourteen – a portrait of Dick Iberville by R. Springfield ‘An Eminent Member of our Staff’

Page Fifteen – ‘By The Old Style’ [Styal?] story by Major Pearl: the heroine’s face “beautiful it is beyond doubt. Beautiful in the full beauty of womanhood and yet there is a winning girlish charm about it. She raises expressive blue grey eyes to the man’s face …”Etc, etc.

Page Sixteen and Seventeen – ‘By the Old Style’ story continued

‘To be continued in our next’ issue – by Major Pearl – do any other issues of Warrior and Pacific exist?

Hold the Back Page! For the next 120 years …

————————-

I shall type out a few more of these strange little mock articles in the coming weeks.

Warrior and Pacific Magazine – Excellent for the ImagiNations?

I feel the Warrior and Pacific should have a travel writer or war correspondent. Maybe we can send an eminent member of our staff Dick Iberville or hope that Captain the Earl of Haynuaght is not too busy with Princess Eloise to provide some Churchill style dispatches from the front?

Warrior and Pacific – It ought to have a railway company named after it.

I feel sure that we should ‘find’ a few more back issues of the Warrior and Pacific, (c/o The Editor Maidstone) in future.

Why do I like this tiny very fragile magazine?

I really like the mixture of tones in the article, faithfully recreating or mocking the magazines of their day.

As a comic book writer and cartoonist at school, I was part of an underground 1980s fanzine / samizdat culture of small comics and magazines satirising events and caricaturing school and national personalities. These were often in small runs of a couple of hand stapled photocopies or hand-drawn originals circulated to avoid unwanted attention from “the authorities”. A scurrilous rival comic in the sixth form got busted, snitched or grassed to teachers (not by me, I hasten to add), shortly before we left school and expulsions were threatened.

B.P.S. Blog Post Script

Interesting comment from Rosemary Hall on the handmade little books, worth sharing:

A delightful find! It reminded me of a handwritten (but full-size) Edwardian magazine, written by members of a family, at least one of whom was awarded a military award – as featured in episode 3 of History Hunters, originally shown on Yesterday, and still, I think, available on catch-up (UKTV).

The writing of such magazines was not unusual, in the days before the availability of commercial entertainment – think of the Hyde Park Gate News, the magazine that Virginia and Vanessa Stephen (to become Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell) and their siblings produced during their childhood. &, while not a magazine, there was the Journal that Beatrix Potter kept for several years, a journal that was not just in tiny writing (like the Brontes’ little magazines) but in code.

Another example of the kind of writing produced for amusement by young people in the past is the collection of handwritten little books produced by the Nelson brothers in 19th century America. The collection was discovered by Pamela Russell when she was at an auction house in southern New Hampshire, and came across a ‘flimsy, old shoebox filled with tiny carefully handwritten books’ – a collection consisting of over 60 volumes!

They are described as comprising ‘an astounding, one-of-a-kind trove of stories and drawings [revealing]…what life was like for …[youngsters] growing up in rural 19th century America.’ The books are now in the collections of Amherst College. To find websites describing the collection, go to a search engine, and type in ‘Amherst Nelson brothers’- and on one website there are digital images of pages from some of the booklets (which always made me think of the Brontes.) You see how the brothers combined accounts of their ordinary daily life with imaginative embellishments.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 6 / 7 June 2021.

The Prisoner Of Zenda 1922 silent film ImagiNations

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Meanwhile back in Zenda …

I watched a free YouTube copy of the Prisoner of Zenda 1922 silent film version (speeded up on the right corner click replay to 1.5 / 1.75)

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Leafy Strelsau

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The bad guys in black helmets – Teutonic looking Black Cuirassiers, who play no further role in the film whatsoever …  all dressed up and nowhere to go, nothing to do …
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The good guys – the White Guard at the Coronation … hardly seen after this.
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A Hollywood mix of Balkan romance uniforms … Tarlenheim (right)

IMDB entry with crew list and trivia https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0013515/

Taster Clips of several film versions of Zenda exist, the 1937 ones onward seem to be available online or DVD. So you would have to buy them. Must track the Peter Sellars 1979 one down.

I could not find this 1922 MGM movie in UK playable DVD form so hopefully not infringing anyone’s copyright by watching.

One of several Youtube links to entire film (admittedly with adverts) https://youtu.be/3R_tWqVGwAk

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 21 May 2020

Close Little Wars – Wheel Meet Again Forest Ambush

North Gondal forests, 1870s – a supply column, deep in the forest, approach a stream

Ahead of the supply column, few yards over the old bridge, a large dead tree had fallen over the road, neatly blocking it.

Suspicious? Old dead trees fall over, and they had had heavy rain storms recently. The old plank bridge wasn’t looking in too good shape either. Must have happened overnight. The Forest Fort foot patrols should have noticed this damage and made good a repair.

They would need to proceed cautiously. Steady there! The weekly supply waggon for the Forest Fort (Fort McGuffin) tipped precariously over and backwards as it crossed the old wooden bridge over the stream.

Crack!

The Redcoat troops of the Yestershire Regiment heard the sound as one of the wheels skewed off at an odd angle. Barrels and boxes tipped out onto the rough forest road and stream. Some of the bridge had washed away … or maybe the rope and timbers had been hacked away?

Assessing the damage to the wheel, Captain Snortt of the Yestershires,  the officer in charge of the supply column, quickly sent the wagon horse and rider ahead to summon reinforcements and a repair team from the Forest Fort (Fort McGuffin).

As the horse and rider disappeared up the forest road, Snort sent his small column of seven redcoats to fan out and protect the cart whilst one of the Army Service Corps men Private Fuller tried to fix the axle and wheel.

The scattered barrels and boxes were stacked to make temporary cover positions.

They wedged the damaged axle on a haybale that they had been carrying for the horse.

Snortt knew that the Forests this far North had eyes everywhere. The local Native Indians were increasingly hostile, they did not enjoy their sacred hunting grounds being carved up by roads and forts, loggers and the land claims of settlers.

To add to his problems, the column included a rare civilian passenger, Kate the youngest daughter of Major McGuffin, the Fort Commander, who was travelling to visit her father. A fine hostage and bargaining chip she would make, if the Indians captured her.

Luckily for Snortt, young Kate was used to frontier life and quickly unpacked a pistol from the baggage, loaded it and watched the surrounding forest. There were spare rifles in the wagon if needed.

An Indian Scout spots the Redcoat supply column and sees the wagon founder on the bridge.

The Indian Scouts who were scattered around hunting through the forest return to their chiefs. They bring news. “The wagon is broken on the bridge.”

“The horse has gone to the fort.”

“Several redcoats have stayed to protect the wagon.”

“There are supplies and a passenger for the Fort.”

Meanwhile back at the bridge, the Redcoats of the Yestershires  heard drums. The low sound of a native signal drum in the distance. Snortt was not sure how far away. Drums talking across the forest trees. Someone may have seen their difficulty and was even now summoning the local hunting parties.

Damn that bridge! Damn that wheel.

It looked to Snortt now that the fallen tree and the storm damaged bridge may not have been such natural events after all.

Meanwhile amongst the trees, the Indian Braves gathered with their spears and hunting rifles. Their tribal chief Old Wooden Legs spoke to the dancing Medicine Man who was blessing their hunt and ordered the drums be silenced. The Summoning was over.

“Let us harry the Redcoats and their wagons to remind them this is Our Land. There may be much of value in the Wagons – firesticks, metal bees* (bullets) and other important supplies for the Forest Fort, a Fort made from the timbers of our sacred trees.”

“Let us use the shadow and cover of these trees to approach the wagon and take something back in return for what these Redcoat devils have done to our forests. Civilians may prove good hostages. If the Redcoats attack or resist, we will use force to defend our forest.”

* The native Gondal Forest Indian name for bullets, “metal bees that sting death”.

Thus the die is set for a confrontation. In part 2 (or chapter 2?) of this small skirmish solo game I shall set out the terrain map, troop dispositions, aims and victory conditions.

Figures, Terrain and used.

Close Wars rules requires a cluttered terrain. Rather than clutter up the kitchen table with a 54mm Close Wars game and have to move it for meals, I wanted to leave this set up to play over several days squeezed in next to my desk and painting table.

I put sheets of felt over my usual portable hex boards for a change, using some chunky bound old volumes for hills. I used strips of felt for added streams and paths, exploiting the dips added some slate chips and chunks from the garden, some twigs and railway modelling bushes.

The damaged bridge was quickly made from a raft of coffee stirrers, superglued and ‘painted’ with felt tips. The bridge provides a “pinch point” between hills and stream for the wagon.

Hopefully it all keeps some of that improvised terrain spirit of our childhood games, of H. G. Wells’ Little Wars and early Donald Featherstone War Games 1962 (the book from which the two page ‘Close Wars’ rules appendix came).

The only large sheet of felt in the house when I was a child, a beautiful thick dark green, was the heat protector under the table cloth for our family dining table, so borrowing this or the dining table itself (above or below) meant toy soldier games had to fit in and finish around family mealtimes.

For a few moments I considered this as a garden game, but with creaky knees and changeable weather, I decided against this. The trees I use for pop-up 54mm games would not like being left outside.

The forest trees are beautiful preformed preprinted thick card ones from Bold Frontiers Australia, a recent gift to aid my Close Little Wars forest games. The three tree sets bring a real pop-up 3D picture book feel to this forest landscape.

My recent figure painting has been inspired by the Frank Humphris illustrations in the Ladybird Classics children’s book Last of the Mohicans, working on Close Wars Natives and Soldiers at 30mm US plastic flats scale. https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2020/05/10/classic-close-wars-and-comic-book-soldiers-back-to-the-forest/

Scenario

The scenario of ‘Wheel Meet Again’, the broken wagon to defend in hostile territory is loosely based on one by the late Stuart Asquith that I used as a memorial game last November. Add a dash of Last of The Mohicans.

Gondal is a borrowed ImagiNation, one of the four kingdoms on a North Pacific ‘Tropical Yorkshire’ island created in the 1830s and 1840s by the Bronte family as youngsters. Other Bronte versions of ‘Tropical Yorkshire’ include Glass Town and Angria (roughly West Africa), whilst Gaaldine is Tropical Yorkshire on two South Pacific islands. Gondal is similar to my ImagiNations continents of North, Central and South Generica, roughly equivalent to the historical Americas.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/12/21/man-of-tin-blogvent-calendar-day-21-angria-rebooted/

The Redcoats

I don’t have any French Indian War / Revolutionary War bicorne figures or redcoats in 54mm at the moment. The BMC 54mm ones are in a box patiently awaiting painting, a year on from Christmas 2019. Instead my 42mm Pound Store Redcoats have stepped in and borrowed the scout trek cart. This overloaded wagon is pulled by a flat cavalryman who disappears to take news to the Forest Fort, Fort McGuffin.

A few smaller Britains hollow-cast figures were added in. The Fort Commander’s daughter is a plastic seaside pirate girl with concealed pistol behind her back, her faithful hound from the old Tradition of London Victorian street figures.

Barrels are buttons from the local craft shop, hay from Britain’s farm series, the baggage from the old Herald cowboy raft.

The Natives

I do have a host of repaired, tuppenny based hollow-cast 50 to 54mm Indians that I have repainted over the last two years. I have generally chosen the non Britain’s Indian figures as they tend to be a little smaller in the mid 40s to 50mm size.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/20/american-indians-first-nations-or-imagi-nations/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/25/rearming-the-native-american-indians-wip-1/

As I sit, they are in the foreground, so they can be bigger.

The skirmish should be over and written up in the next few days?

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 16/17 May 2020.

At a Border Watchtower in one of the Forgotten Minor States

Keeping watch towards the disputed border, the Jagers of this watchtower scan the forest edges. These are the Jagers or border patrol for the Duchy of Reissenshein, that Forgotten Minor State of forest and mountains.

Forgotten Minor States – https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2020/04/19/scrap-napoleonics-ready-to-scrap-forgotten-minor-states/

Glued on, tucked away on the hex edge, some mountain rabbits
Roof made removable with a little card retaining frame inside. Notice boards made for inside.
15mm Peter Laing Jäger or Alpini figure, HO forest animals from Noch including fox with bird

Details of the two Noch sets including the Laser Cut Mini cardboard jagerstand

So much for getting a game in this morning, instead first I needed to build this old laser cut mini card kit from Noch.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 20 April 2020

Scrap Napoleonics Ready to Scrap! Forgotten Minor States

“What you see is what you get …” 2017 Digital Dawn Patrol Reconnaissance Photo

Back in 2017 on one of my “recconaissance flights over the digital front lines” or whatever it was Henry Hyde used to call his web, blog and podcast reviews in Miniature Wargames with Battle Games, I spotted this 1.3 kilos of 15mm lead scrap. In this fuzzy eBay picture I spotted some Peter Laing figures – his horses are very distinctive – and “took a punt” on buying for about a tenner with postage.

Digital Dawn Patrol 54mm scramble https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/08/12/tsaf-new-flying-banshee-biplane/

Now the Laing figure moulds are vanished and probably no more. From time to time I and others of the plucky and ever vigilant members of the Peter Laing Collectors Circle suit up, put on the flying goggles, get the engines running and chocks away, fly high and keep a watching brief on the Web and EBay to see what Laing figures come up for sale, glimpsed amongst the mass of figures far below online.

Me & my 54mm fellow plucky pilots from Ian Dury’s Flying Circus of the Digital Dawn Laing Patrol

On returning from our Digital Dawn Patrol, “we few, we plucky few” then pass the word round on the Peter Laing MeWe web community pages set up by Ian Dury. https://mewe.com/join/peterlaingfigures

Although “time spent in Reconnaissance is seldom wasted” (family WW2 saying but who first said that?), this haul was a bit of a Peter Laing dud. Not much a ‘show’! Here is the debrief and the photographic reconnaissance:

Stylish Peter Laing exotic Ottoman or Turkish type figures – well worth recasting more one day!
The Peter Laing cavalry horse I spotted, and two swords and shield men.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/13/a-few-peter-laing-figures-amongst-the-scrap-lead-mountain/

What to do with over a kilo of scrap figures?

The remaining 1.3 kilos of of white metal and lead scrap was 99% 15mm, mostly painted and unbroken, although minus the usual musket ends, bayonets and flags. Mixed manufacturers but 90% Napoleonic, no guns, few cavalry. A few stray Ancients and some ACW figures who might become guerrilla forces.

I don’t now know the origin of the various figures but it seemed a bit of crime to melt them down for homecasting. Some gamers somewhere had spent a lot of time painting these figures. It was not their tiny fault they had become detached from their units and so ended up unwanted as odds and ends with no RLS martial pride

Some figures as you can see in the original lead kilo photograph were on unit stands, most needed rebasing and flocking. This would add some unity to the varying heights, build, paintwork and stances of this mixed group.

Dividing the groups up was done mostly by uniform colour and style of head gear. This makes it easy to incorporate further random job lot figures in future.

Before repainting or re-uniforming, I photographed one or two features such as flags

I have temporarily misplaced most of the battered broken and unbased cavalry – no matter.

ImagiNations Inspiration for the Forgotten Minor States

For what follows, if you are outraged in a realist historical button counting way by the misidentification and mishmash of Napoleonic units, I will blame the following:

A) The Balkan Ruritanian natures of the proposed Woking 2021 54mm games day group build up of forces https://littlewarsrevisited.boards.net/thread/483/woking-2021-group-build-game?page=4

B) Antony Hope for writing the Prisoner of Zenda, here ably illustrated by Charles Dana Gibson in 1898

C) everyone else’s fictional ImagiNations, maps and campaigns at the moment from the Brontes through Hyboria onwards to Tradgardland and Ascaria.

D) the Brontes

E) Gilbert and Sullivan – not only their many Ruritanian states but also because it was the first time I got wear a “redcoat” (albeit from a theatrical costumiers).

The Forgotten Minor States and Principalities of MittelMittel Europe.

Along the Alpen fringes of MittelMittelEurope in the late 18th and 19th century were plenty of now Forgotten Minor States, now subsumed by unification, inattention, cartographical errors, inbreeding, insurrection, migration, invasion or royal marriage into other larger countries.

Few today now remember the triumphs and traditions, victories and defeats, failed colonies, romances and intrigues, scandals and petty squabbles of their plentiful heirs and claimants, Dukes and Duchesses, Princes and Princesses, Emperors and Electors, Statesmen and Generals, Chancellors and Presidents, Rebels, Republicans and Exiles.

Here are some of the fine forces of the FMS – Forgotten Minor States.

Verdigris

The dandyish young fops in command of the Third Verdigris Volunteer Militia
Musket drill for the Third Verdigris Volunteer Militia – Fyreloque Section – directed by their NCO scout.

Guns for the artillery figures came as game pieces from the Napoleonic version of the Risk boardgame.

Light Artillery of the Verdigris Volunteer Militia – a suitably grey misty day for their grey green uniforms.

In this game world, these early to mid Nineteenth century troops have very light artillery pieces which can be horse drawn or dragged and manhandled on the battlefield by ropes by their four men crews and the rest of the “fire lock” or “fyreloque” company of troops. In mountainous regions the guns are disassembled and carried by Man or Mule.

Some spare Peter Laing horses and holders, artillery and baggage train will have to step in for future games.

The misty mountain regions of Verdigris is allied with Upper or Higher Plumea (see below). Its principal industry is copper mining, copper working for a range of industrial and artistic craft purposes, allied to the use of green pigment by artists. This has slowly declined since more stable green pigments were discovered and became available. As in Bleudelys, its pigment rival, the women of Verdigris play an important role in the processing of the pigment.

The flag reflects the mountain grey mist and the copper green of the Verdigris pigment industry.

Pompomerania

Here we see a fine contingent and drums of the Pompomeranian Grenadiers on field exercises, tramping through a field for exercise, as ever poorly commanded by their General Abysmal Notuptodemark. On this occasion he is not with them, being back at his headquarters, having a major fashion crisis trying to decide what to wear.

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Notuptothemark’s Fashion Crisis depicted (Wikipedia source: Bismarck article.)

* Not to confused with the region of Pomerania mentioned by Prussian Otto von Bismarck who expressed a view that involvement in the turbulent Balkan wars was “not worth the bones of a single Pomeranian grenadier”.

Pompomerania as a minor state or region has two main industries – goat and sheep herding and turning the wool into the exotic dyed pom-poms supplied to the many military uniforms of many countries worldwide. Dyes are sourced through many local wildflowers and plants in the well grazed mountain meadows of Upper Pompomerania, along with a trading approach to purchase such dye stuffs from many sources worldwide.

The excessively large white PomPoms on their shakos both signify the importance of sheep and goat wool to the national culture and economy, as well as advertising the national wares at any military event and occasion at home and abroad from wars to military tattoos, coronations and state funerals. Approaches and requests can be made through the Pompomeranian Embassy and Trade Delegation in your country.

As result of its military exports, it aims to achieve armed neutrality in most conflicts, except where its trading sources are threatened. When nations are at war, demands for adornments to military headgear increase including for splendid volunteer and yeomanry uniforms. During the occasional “Long Peace”, uniforms become even more impractical and flamboyant. A rare “win win” situation in peace and war.

Additional Note: The small quick firing cannon used in many countries is based on the Pompomeranian quick firing light artillery whose rapid fire sound “pom-pom-pom-pom” is due both to excellently choreographed artillery units (drill days Tuesdays Thursdays and Saturdays) and to the similarity to the rhythmic sound of some of the wool processing machinery powered by water mills in this mountainous and snowmelt terrain of Upper Pompomerania. This rhythm is also reflected in the drums and military bands of Pompomerania and the tuneless near wordless “Pom Pom Pom”ing Chorus Section of the national anthem.

An information request to the Pompomeranian embassy can confirm that the breed of local mountain dogs used to carry the sledge or dog cart artillery is indeed the tough and very fluffy White Pompomeranian breed. These also make excellent sheep herding dogs.

The Duchy of Hesseansachs

An advanced unit of Hesseansachs Grenadiers and military cadets.

This minor region and Duchy of Hesseansachs thrives on the supplies of the jute trade, rivalled only by Dundee and the curiously revolving town of Glasgae in Hibernia.

Like the Pompomeranian economy, Hesseansachs thrives in times of war and peace. In wartime it is busy supplying jute sandbags for fortifications or Hessean Sacks as they are known. In times of peace it supplies shopping bags and in case of heavy rainfall both in peace and war, hessean sacks are supplied as sandbags for flood prevention. The military personnel are trained to assist in these times of deluge. War, peace, disaster or shopping, the Jute mills of Hesseansachs are busy by day and sometimes by night. The national motto roughly translates as “Your disaster is our national income”.

A small Hesseansachs Navy and Marines force exists to protect the shipping and supply lines to the sources of jute such as India and Southeast Asia.

Gelbania

Gelbanian Infantry Volunteer Militia – Light Operetta Section

(Above) The “greenery yellary Grosvenor Gallery” uniforms of Gelbania depict the verdant greenery and sunshine of this mountainous state, whose inhabitants frequently indulge in arias and light operettas. They are noted for their harmonic marching songs as they trek up and down the mountain passes. On Sundays, small military bands play a selection of light airs at bandstands in each of the few towns. Here in this small platoon are some cadets and members of the Light Operetta Company of Gelbanian Volunteer Militia – Chorus Section.

“In fine voice, lads!” Singing and shooting, the two main occupations of Gelbanians.

Upper or Higher Plumea

The old green and red of the Higher Plumea Infantry

This small selection of troops from Upper Plumea shows in its uniform the alliance by Royal marriages of the Duchess Maria of the flaming red hair to the reigning family of the small state of Verdigris.

You can clearly see the similarity to the dark green uniforms of the Verdigris Volunteer Militia, the main difference being the copper buttons and band instruments of the Verdigris troops. The two regions share misty and humid microclimates unusual in the Alpen regions. Verdigris is supported by its copper mining and copper working industry.

Upper or Higher Plumea’s mountainous valley economy is mostly based on breeding birds for their feather plumes to supply the military and civilian millinery industry, much like Pompomerania.

The Upper Plumean troops have a tall plume with red upper part and the lower green section reflecting the alliance with the Verdigris.

No one now remembers what happened to Lower or Middle Plumea, whose troops must have had more restrained and unimpressive hats.

Weissenstein

Another mountainous minor state, its troops wear white uniforms and its few Marines of its tiny lake and river navy have attractive top hats.

Weissenstein Militia and Cadets
Weissenstein Marines

Weissenstein Colonial Grenadier troops

Reissenshein

We are awaiting uniform information on this calisthenic nation of early risers.

Thyer-Brigadia

The proudest part of the Thyer Brigadian uniforms is the brass cavalry style plumed dragoon helmets which are often copied by Fire Brigades worldwide. Interestingly these Volunteer Militia troops are also the Volunteer Fire Brigade in their various towns and villages (hence the variations in uniforms), making sure that their native Alpine wooden houses and mountain forests do not catch fire. A fireman’s axe is carried on fire duty and state occasions. The wooden fire towers are also part of Militia watch posts in each valley.

Standard Bearer and Thyer Brigadia Volunteer Militia and Fire Brigade

Thyer Brigadia Militia Infantry and Volunteer Fire fighting Corps

Cacadorias

These excellent Rifleman are from the western edges of Southern Europe. Their brown uniforms provide good cover and camouflage.

Cacadores riflemen and guerilla leader

Bleudelys (Republique de)

Bleudelys Republican forces (below) wear light blue plumes on their darker blue uniforms. These are a selection of the Bleudelys Grenadiers (the ‘Grognards’) or the Old Guard. The uniform is based on that of the Royal Guard of the former Royaume de Bleudelys.

Bleudelys Grenadiers

Bleudelys forces include the Blue plumed Line Infantry, Artillery and Bicorne clad Marines.

Bleudelys Line Infantry

Bleudelys standard bearers

This Bleudelys Republic is currently run by one Revolutionary turned Emperor, the short and far from boney and skeletal Mediterranean-born former artillery officer Napoli de Leon (Napoli the Lion).

Bleudelys Artillery

And finally the Marine Corps and boatmen with their distinctive bicorne hats

Bleudelys Marines with Bicornes and blue plumes

Great Butlinnia and Hibernia

The redcoats of Great Butlinnia, a large island off the coast of MittelMittelEurope with its cheery Redcoat Army, its Navy, Marine, are allied with its North, the kilted Celtic redcoated troops of Hibernia.

Hibernian Infantry

Ruled by King William or ‘King Billy’, Great Butlinnia does not maintain a large standing Army except for the oppression of democracy and reform. In times of peace its Redcoats double up as family entertainers and variety artistes, its wartime barracks serving also as holiday camps for its many citizens and tourists.

Butlinnia Red Coat Infantry

As a result of its dual Redcoat nature, each regiment and branch of the armed forces is in great rivalry with its ornate uniforms, showy parade movements, music and marches on state occasions.

Butlinnia Grenadiers

Great Butlinnian Artillery
Butlinnia Rifle Brigade
King William (King Billy) of Butlinnia and his Commander in Chief

The Republic of the Uwessae

Uwessae, the phonetically spelt former colony of Great Butlinnia in the Neu Welt or New World of Northern Generica has kept the military shako of its former masters but changed its coat colours throughout revolution and independence to a Republican inspired Bleudelys dark blue to avoid confusion with the Redcoats.

More Bluecoated Uwessae Infantry and Officers.

Officer of Uwessae forces with the stars flag and command group with soft caps.

Uwessae Artillery

A troubled border exists to the north of the Uwessae where a mountainous forested country was once occupied by Bleudelys as a trading colony, alliances with warring tribes of the native Generican inhabitants and simmering friction with the existing dominant power of Great Butlinnia – the colony of Butlinnian North Generic or BNG.

For much of the rest of the early 19th Century world in this Napoli-de-Leonic Era of world war and Minor States, look no further than the Bronte ImagiNations of Gondal, Glasstown and Angria.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/gaming-the-bronte-family-imaginations-of-glasstown-angria-gondal-and-gaaldine/

These are well summarised in Isabel Greenberg’s new graphic novel Glass Town https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/23/glass-town-by-isabel-greenberg-bronte-imaginations-in-graphic-novel-form/

Blog posted by Mark, ‘Man of TIN’ 17/18 April 2020

ImagiNations Mapped

Please note: Tony Adams’ map of his ImagiNations world Tian is copyrighted. I have taken a screenshot, very tiny here, to give you an idea how professional this looks and showcase his blog.

I love a good map on a blog or in a book. I noticed this beautiful map on Tony Adams’ The Woodscrew Miniature Army blog. He has been writing recently about his reimagined Earth in the form of his ImagiNations world Tian.

Please note his map is personal and copyright and not to be used or published without his permission.

It was made for Tony by a professional cartographer, Greg Shipp of Lost in Maps, prepared from Tony’s sketches. https://www.lostinmaps.co.uk/

Screenshot from Greg Shipp’s website Lost in Maps.

Tony has been setting out in print over several blog posts the background to his reimagined version of the world for his ImagiNations.

One of the interesting points he made is that his reimagined world and its armies c. the Eighteen Nineties has only coal and therefore steam power, but no reserves of oil or petroleum. So effectively, what some others would call ‘steam punk’.

As Tony says in his first Tian related post on Thursday 5th March 2020:

“In most respects my planet has evolved in the same way as  Earth and has now reached the equivalent of the 1890’s on Earth. At this time however, progress has slowed in some areas. My planet’s development is firmly harnessed to the horse and steam train as the only forms of transportation and apart from the very earliest experiments in coal fired steam generation of electricity, the future holds no prospect of an Earth like oil based revolution.

Small quantities of oil for lubrication purposes and a little gas are becoming available as by products from steaming of coal for the production of coke for iron smelting but these are still very infant technologies. However, radio technology has advanced a little faster than on Earth and is at a level similar to that on Earth in 1918. In addition the telephone and telegraph are in widespread use and general industrial capabilities are very close to those on earth in the 1890s.”

Fascinating.

I first came across Tony Adams when I found his blog about his Miniature Woodscrew Army, inspired by an article in Miniature Warfare in 1969. Tony then kindly sent me some vintage Airfix 1960s figures that he had spare, as he is not currently wargaming. Some of these repainted and rebased figures have featured on this blog such as https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/08/28/adamstown-or-angria-vintage-airfix-acw-repaired/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/08/02/a-1960s-airfix-owl-pellet/

Tony’s blog and book reviews (often about military logistics) are worth dropping in on from time to time. I’m sure Tony would welcome people’s comments:

https://thewoodscrewminiaturearmy.blogspot.com/?wref=bif

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 29th March 2020

Bring Me Some Men Who Are Stout Hearted Men!

“Stout Hearted Men” 1921 France

If you needed a ‘band’ of brothers for an ImagiNations regiment, look no further.

I’ve no idea who this merry band are (see clues below) but just thought them a “great bunch of lads” with a fine selection of hats worth sharing with the world.

I found this fine photograph postcard on EBay whilst searching for early scouting images. I bought it from a seller in Portugal. It was postmarked France 1921, post WW1 including “Menars 19 April 1921. Loire et Cher”

It is addressed to: Henri Moreau a Villeneuve, Cne (Commune?) de St Denis sur Loire, Par Mesnau. (“By Mesnau”)

According to the trusty Wikipedia, Saint-Denis-sur-Loire and Menars are both communes in the Loir-et-Cher department of central France. It is a suburb of Blois, 7 km northeast of the town, and lies on the river Loire, 63 km southwest of Orléans.

Checking maps, Villeneuve and Menars are towns or villages within this area

Several postmarks – Victor ? [Loir] et Cher? 18 April 1921 / Menars 19 April 1921 Loire et Cher.

“Cher Camarade, Deux mots pour te dire del’ invitations, que je l’avais parle vient, Je me suits assure de ton Bon affections. Anatole Cournois. Envoi de Pepe. Bonjour et au revoir. Je compte sur toi.” Anatole Cournois

Which roughly translates as:

“Dear Comrade, Two words to tell you of the invitations I had spoken about, I am making sure of your good affections. [Messages scribbled into corners] Sending Pepe. Hello and goodbye. I count on you.” Anatole Cournois

A French tricolour flag with some French writing “[fran]caise? … de la …” and what looks like the figure of a Morris dancer with cross straps can be seen at the back? The odd tricolour sash can be seen in the left front rank.

I wonder if Anatole or Henri is pictured?

No idea which group they are from or form the band for. Some of them look old enough to have been Poilus in the Great War.

Blog posted by Mark, stouthearted Man of TIN, 14 March 2020.

The Stout Hearted Men reference? The blog post title is a song by Nelson Eddy from New Moon (1940) https://youtu.be/1vjqfvZVReM, which I recall hearing being much parodied on the Morecambe and Wise 1973 Christmas show.

Anne Bronte Bronte200 born 17 January 1820

Portrait of Anne by her brother Branwell Bronte. Public Domain

Happy Birthday Anne Bronte! Co-Creator of Gondal!

Today is Anne Bronte’s 200th Birthday, one of the co-creators of the Juvenilia works of ImagiNations that have inspired many of my recent games.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/gaming-the-bronte-family-imaginations-of-glasstown-angria-gondal-and-gaaldine/

From her Wikipedia entry:

“Reading fed the children’s imagination. Their creativity soared after their father presented Branwell with a set of toy soldiers in June 1826. They gave the soldiers names and developed their characters, which they called the “Twelves”. This led to the creation of an imaginary world: the African kingdom of “Angria” which was illustrated with maps and watercolour renderings. The children devised plots about the inhabitants of Angria and its capital city, “Glass Town”, later called Verdopolis.”

“The fantasy worlds and kingdoms gradually, acquired the characteristics of the real world — sovereigns, armies, heroes, outlaws, fugitives, inns, schools and publishers. The characters and lands created by the children had newspapers, magazines and chronicles which were written in extremely tiny books, with writing so small it was difficult to read without a magnifying glass. These creations and writings were an apprenticeship for their later, literary talents.”

“Around 1831, when Anne was eleven, she and Emily broke away from Charlotte and Branwell to create and develop their own fantasy world, “Gondal“. Anne was particularly close to Emily especially after Charlotte’s departure for Roe Head School, in January 1831.”

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/gaming-the-bronte-family-imaginations-of-glasstown-angria-gondal-and-gaaldine/

My fictional map or geography of Gondal, based on Yorkshire.

Gondal, her co-creation with Emily, is set in the North Pacific and is the usual Bronte ImagiNations mix of lush verdant mountains and moors of “Tropical Yorkshire”.

When I checked what else was in the North Pacific, the list of countries I found seems to have forgotten to include Gondal so I have helpfully added this in.

https://www.bronte.org.uk/bronte-200

Happy 200th Birthday Anne!

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN 17th January 2020