Kaskowiski 1873 inspired scenario

The Kaskowiski invasion hoax of 1873 set me thinking about future games scenarios that could be based around the supposed or suggested incident. After all, that is what the author or newspaper editor of the Daily Southern Cross David Luckie intended in his May 1873 article,  published in February 1873, to stir up concern over New Zealand’s naval and land defences. Eventually continued concern led to the building of fortified batteries.

Where would I get a suitable coastal fort or battery as a focus for a game?

I  have explored Victorian and later adapted wartime forts and gun batteries  in the West Country ranging from Pendennis Castle

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/pendennis-castle/

in Falmouth and its sister fort of St Mawes (both English Heritage) along with the St. Antony Battery and Lighthouse nearby (National Trust) and similar adapted fortifications in the Scilly Isles. I was familiar with the underground passageways and ammunition stores, mess rooms, ventilation grilles and concrete gun emplacements that might be found in such coastal  forts.

There are some interesting photographs of Victorian coastal forts and artillery on the internet, ranging from Britain to New Zealand.

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Fort Jervois (New Zealand) https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/fort-jervois

Closed by recent earthquake damage, Fort Jervois has been photographed by Urbex photographers https://urbexcentral.com/2016/01/27/earthquake-island/fort-jervois-ripapa-island-95/

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A little picture research brought up this massive gun (or tiny people)

Seeing these last few pictures of grassy concrete batteries and giant coastal guns convinced me that I had a  suitable fort or two packed away from childhood – the Airfix Gun Emplacement.

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With a little repainting, these would serve from Victorian times onwards. At a pinch they should suit my 15mm Peter Laing figures as well as  the larger OO/HO 20 to 25mm plastic Airfix sort of figures.

 

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Repainted and flocked, this old Airfix fort with gun shield off makes a reasonably old-looking  coastal gun position.

My 15mm and 20mm figure bases are a little large for the narrowest passageways, so I may have to trim any bases slightly before painting up a suitable garrison or attackers. I remember it being a tight fit anyway with the later larger Airfix OO/HO second version figures (the first version 1960s  ones had smaller but more topply bases).

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I also have a passable Airfix coastal defence fort from childhood that could be added, much like the one featured on the front of John Curry’s recent reprint of Donald Featherstone’s unpublished Wargaming Commando Operations.

The 1873 Kaskowiski Russian Invasion of New Zealand Hoax focuses on an amphibious raid or landing by Russian Marines, Naval Infantry  or Sailor, supported by a Russian Ironclad like the PavelPavlosk.

The closest ‘Russian marines’ I currently have are some 15mm Peter Laing Russians (painted as Bulgarians)

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Russian Ironclad of the 1870s the Petropavlovsk https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_ironclad_Petropavlovsk

I do have about four Russian Marines from a brief flirtation in the 1980s with new Platoon 20 figures  (metal, 20mm, which wiped my pocket money). These Platoon 20 figures are still available.

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The officer with pistol and rifleman with bayonet might be suitable for such Kaskowiski scenarios, rather than the LMG and SMG figures.

I shall have to look through and see what Peter Laing figures I have that are suitable. Here are my 15mm Russians, disembarking near a lonely customs post.

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The customs officer and volunteer rifle Militia man confront the Russian Marines.
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The good old Airfix Pontoon Bridge boat makes a handy pinnace or Invasion barge. Heroscape Hex landscape.

It will be interesting to research suitable Victorian uniforms for 19th century Colonial figures.

The Volunteer Rifle movement had reached New Zealand by the time of the Kaskowiski invasion hoax of 1873, as this account shows in the Daily Southern Cross  newspaper around the hoax date of 17 February 1873.

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O should the Cask of Whisky / Kaskowiski come? The Volunteers will sort it out, as this ditty poem suggests.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, November 2018.

Auckland Invaded May 1873

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In amongst the shipping, commercial  and mining news the new Editor David Luckie inserted his “fake news” of 17 February 1873  issue of the Daily Southern Cross 
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Clever stores inserted their own topical links to this invasion hoax “fake news” story
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The freight ship Golden Cross is mentioned in the hoax account, adding realism

An explanation of the Invasion Hoax was given several days later by the editor of the Daily Southern Cross.

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The point made clear a few days later?

The need to explain or excuse the hoax and how it was set up or could be revealed as “fake news” by its future date 

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The whole fake news story

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18730217.2.19

 

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At this point the invasion begins with Russian marines …

A suitable gaming scenario could be made of this landing.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18730217.2.19

This was published in the Daily Southern Cross, 17 February 1873 – note the date of this deliberately alarmists news story – set 3 months in the future, 15th May 1873.

The next issue editorial 18th February featured the explanation or the reveal.

 

IMG_0343IMG_0344There are several online articles about this Russian Scare and the historical background.

https://airminded.org/2008/05/30/the-russians-are-coming/

https://nzhistory.govt.nz/the-russians-are-coming

Victorian and WW2 coastal defences at Fort Takapuna

https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-go/auckland/places/fort-takapuna-historic-reserve/fort-takapuna-history/

https://www.myguideauckland.com/things-to-do/north-head-historic-reserve

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/history-2/

Even a podcast

http://www.podcasts.com/the-podcasters-guide-to-the-conspiracy-14/episode/the-russian-invasion-of-auckland-1873

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN Oct