Mil Mod issue no. 1 1971

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MAP Model Railway News December 1970

Ten years later this would be a monthly joy …

Advert found whilst leaving through a pile of old railway magazines.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN 8 October 2017

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Uniforms Uniforms

 

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Drum Majorette, Freeport, Long Island, USA (Image: Corbis  / Bettmann) on the Front Cover of Uniforms by Bill Dunn

 

A second-hand find, this picture rich 2009 book  by Bill Dunn is now out of print but was published by Lawrence King.com (a publisher of many fashion and textile books). It contains 294 pictures, 247 in colour.

Bill Dunn is a style editor, having worked on GQ, Esquire and LV magazines. As a result, he brings a different feel to this book than a military historian might. Full of uniform pictures, mostly in colour, Dunn uses familiar film stills as well as colour photos from all over the world to illustrate the very short essay at the start of each section. Overall , Dunn wants to know “why is it a good idea for people to look the same? Nothing sums up the power of the ‘We’ like a uniform.”

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The book illustrates the role of uniforms for every job role  from Hitler and The Pope and his Papal Swiss Guards to traffic wardens in Britain and Vietnam, from Boy Scouts to bunny girls,  from fast food restaurants in the USA to policemen in Korea, from air hostesses to schoolchildren in Japan.

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The book is interesting for the gamer or creator of Imagi-Nations uniforms.

One of my favourite ornate uniforms in the book  is shown on the back cover – the mystery of who wears this smart get-up is revealed on page 78/79. They are Monaco police officers in their dress uniforms. Intriguingly, one of them has paratroop wings!

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Italian Carabinieri and Monaco police officers, shown in Uniforms by Bill Dunn.  Left photo from Corbis / Paul Almaty and (Right) Getty /AFP/ Valery Hache.

The captions are both informative and witty in places – the Carabinieri picture is captioned “Giant Italian Police (Carabinieri) in front of very small people in the Piazza del Duomo in Milan.” Pure Slinkachu or model village, this.

The Future section covers Astronauts to Science Fiction films and some bizarre past visions of the future.

Uniforms by Bill Dunn covers equally male and female uniforms, military, police  and civilian. Ukrainian female paratroopers (women make up 10% of their armed forces) share the page with Indonesian women soldiers with sub machine guns trying to march on parade in absurdly  tight skirts!

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Moroccan Army parade uniforms c. 2000 (Corbis / SYGMA/ Robert Patrick)

My other favourite elaborate Imagi-Nations uniform is the parade dress of male and female members of the Moroccan army, c. 2000.

This book sets up such smart military and police parade uniforms up against civialian uniforms of drum majorettes and cinema or hotel Commissionaires to show the similarities and differences. If you’re not in the military or public services, it’s not always called a uniform, it’s called “career apparel” (or workwear).

The chapter introductions are quite interesting. Uniform is something you (have to) wear to show belonging, sometimes to show Authority but paradoxically of also being under Authority – you have to wear what you’re told. It reminds me of many of my Dad’s stories about the importance of spotless kit, shiny boots, berets and shapeless uniforms to a National Serviceman, some of which I shared last month.

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Uniforms by Bill Dunn is as interesting to flick through and dip into as Preben Kannik’s Military Uniforms of the World in Colour (Blandford, 1967/8). I am happily reminded of the section in Harry Pearson’s gaming memoir Achtung Schweinhund when he talks about endlessly poring through this library book trying to make lists of which is the coolest and most impressive, the worst or most curious uniform.  I’m sure we all did this in our own ways. But that’s for another blogpost …

If you like uniform books or creating Imagi-Nations troops, Uniforms by Bill Dunn is well worth ordering  online secondhand. It has some inserting points to make about the uniforms that many of us, military or civilian, choose or are forced to wear throughout life from childhood onwards.

Blosposted by Mark, Man of TIN, July 9th 2017.

Maori Wars update

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My Peter Laing Colonials and Blues and Greys versus the Generican Natives – Not quite the Maori Wars (Figure / Photos: Man of TIN)

imageAs a follow up to my earlier Maori Wars and Peter Laing related blog posts, here are the Andy Callan rules in full – or so I thought!

John The Wargames Hermit blogger in the USA was interested in these Maori bush wars rules and as back copies of this issue of Military Modelling magazine are probably quite scarce (I have hacked most of my magazines to pieces), I have added the missing section.

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The amended Maori Wars rules by Andy Callan in Military Modelling, December 1983.

However, flicking through my box file, I found that the above rules as printed in September 1983 Military Modelling had some errors – they were corrected by Andy Callan in a half page erratum page in Military Modelling December 1983.

I also noticed in the book list that the Ian Knight who wrote the excellent Osprey book on the New Zealand Wars had also written a couple of interesting articles called “Fire in the Bush” in Military Modelling  in April and November 1980, worth tracking down.

I also found some interesting articles on the New Zealand Wars in that most reliable of sources, Wikipedia.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musket_Wars

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_Wars featuring the unusual war memorial

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_New_Zealand

These entries also features some interesting pictures, including:

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The Death of Von Tempsky 1868 by Kennett Watkins. Wikipedia Public Domain source

An atmospheric view of the terrain is shown  in “The Death of Von Tempsky at Te Ngutu o Te Manu”, a portrayal of an incident in the New Zealand wars on 7 September 1868. Apparently published in the New Zealand Mail, last produced in 1907, this Lithograph from 1893 by William Potts (1859-1947) was made from a painting by Kennett Watkins (1847-1933). Wikipedia image in public domain.

Utu is a New Zealand Maori Wars film from 1983/1984 (with director’s Utu – Redux  cut issued about 2013) that I have never yet seen, here described: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086497/ 

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My Peter Laing Reenactment Society – the Maori Carpet Wars re-enacted in black and white  (Figures / photo: Man of TIN)

For my previous posts featuring the Maori Wars:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/peter-laing-figures-in-carpet-forests/  featuring the rest of Andy Callan’s article

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/close-little-wars-scenarios-and-inspiration/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

Happy (Maori War) Gaming.

Blog Postscript (B.P.S.)

I had an interesting email from Andy Callan last week about his Maori Wars rules, surprised to see his Maori rules and hair roller armies still in use.

Andy Callan: “Wow! That’s a real blast from the past. When I wrote these rules I saw them as a sort of Victorian assymetrical Vietnam equivalent – high tech westerners vs wily bunkered-down natives…
I’m still actively wargaming and writing new stuff. Have a look on Amazon for Peter Dennis’ Battle for Britain and you will see what I am currently up to … Good to hear from you. What a great hobby this is – it is still keeping me busy nearly fifty years after I started out!” 

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, August 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Man Craft hero # 1

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Photograph of Nicholas and his beautiful fort, courtesy of the Advertiser  group of Newspapers,  Lancashire. Reprinted in Military Modelling, August 1983.

My first Man Craft Hero featured on this blog is shown here from the August 1983 Military Modelling magazine, one of the early editions of this magazine that my Dad bought home for me.

I love this fort (based on Ladysmith Barracks in Manchester) which matches the style of old toy soldiers, an excellent simple display frame for these figures.

There  is a nice depth to this fort and a lovely inner courtyard.  Although designed for display, this is a fort that any child would want to play with. It has a lovely ‘toy’ feel to it.

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Being myself a bit ‘cack-handed’  in the area of craft and woodwork, at the time I read this I was struggling through school woodwork lessons, so I was especially impressed that this obviously proud disabled young man called Nicholas managed to create this  beautiful fort. It must have taken a great amount of time and effort. One deservedly very proud grandfather!

I have always found the pride in his handiwork by Nicholas and his grandfather inspiring.

The barrack  gateway is nicely recalled in Nicholas’ fort. This gateway is all that remains of the Ladysmith Barracks which was demolished in 1985, two years after Nicholas made his model.

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Ladysmith Barracks, Manchester (Wikipedia, Gerald England, geograph.org.uk 1033130.jpg)

Once home of the late Manchester Regiment, the  Ladysmith Barracks is pictured on the following web sites:

http://www.tameside.gov.uk/museumsgalleries/mom/history/ladysmith

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladysmith_Barracks

http://www.c5d.co.uk/ladysmithbarracks.php

Look out for my future Man Craft Hero blog posts of the next few months.

Blogposted with admiration by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, July 2016.