Inspired by Bob Cordery’s DayGlo Castle

Last week was enriched for me by watching Bob Cordery on his Wargaming Miscellany blog transform a flourescent My Little Pony-esque aquarium castle …

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/a-day-glo-castle-what-was-i-thinking.html

into a promisingly odd Ruritanian war games castle in finest shades of grey. Inspired.

http://wargamingmiscellany.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/the-former-day-glo-castle-begins-to.html

This made me think it was time to start work on another recent seaside gift shop impulse purchase that I saw and thought, “That might just be …”

IMG_0214
54mm Tradition of London metal Confederate infantry and Herald Confederate Bugler in the original unaltered  “Summer House”.

It took me a while to work out exactly what the house was for. Looking at it outside the shop, hidden beneath its very reasonable price label of £6.99, I spotted a fairly obvious hole.

IMG_0215
40mm Prince August homecast cowboy figures (designed by HE Holger Eriksson)

A hole which could be turned from looking through a “round window” into a “square window” (memories  of 1970s BBC Playschool flood back!)

IMG_0217
An  unusual  hideyhole for a sneaky Yankee sniper … a stylish Herald 1950s 54mm Union infantryman.

I looked at this and thought that underneath the charmingly rustic addition of moss and pine cones, there was a simple solid little building, albeit one a little grand in its gables and roof work.

Maybe it could be a Wild West Train station? A mail or trading post?

It could be an excellently rough toy-like building for the wargames table or garden war game, representing a range of periods. With a little work …

IMG_0216
Simple plain back wall. Beautifully painted 54mm Confederate Butternut infantry from the Tradition of London’s old shop in Shepherd’s Market, London.

It works with a range of figure scales from Lego minifigures and 40mm Prince August Cowboys through to 54mm.

IMG_0218
Already stripped of some of its stranger decoration, its lazy potential begins to show. Suitable American themed Lego minifigures.

A touch of Andrew Wyeth or Grant Wood’s American Gothic …

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/14/hobby-learning-1-andrew-wyeth/

Further Renovations

Short work with a craft knife removed the oversized blue hat, bird house, pine cone roof decorations, hanging string thread and twisty branch things. Much of it was originally hot glue gunned in the factory, so not too difficult to remove. I wanted to keep the rough and ready nature of the building and its materials

Some of this removed scrap was reused such as the staples, reused to hook on the removable Station and Stores signs, which were made from thin balsa wood. These hooked over the existing “Our Summer Home” Sign. In this way different language signs could be used for different scenarios. The new looking Balsa signs were aged by staining with a tea bag, confident that the lettering would not run as I used artists fine liner waterproof ink pens.

The separate “miniature bird house” on the pole is now an ornament in my kitchen.

IMG_0220
Tracks laid, the railway halt is open and a photograph taken to mark the occasion …. Tradition of London 54mm figures except the Station master / guard with repaired flag.
IMG_0224
The official railway halt  opening photograph, June  18## (reproduced with permission from our tiny blog photographer).

The altered bird house entrance / round window can be seen here.

IMG_0223
Watch out! The Rainbow Gang are in town … Red, Blue and Yella (no coward, he!) Lovely Britain’s hollowcast figures.

A simple square window was added to the rounded bird hole and the small round perch removed. This was glued at front as a log next to the giant axe. Small wooden patches of damage from removing items were repaired either by brown felt tip or coloured / stained coffee stirrer ‘patches’ superglued in place. Good and rustic.

IMG_0225
Changing the signs around and adding a female and child figure from the Safari Toob Wild West Settlers set brings the look of a proud couple of homesteaders being photographed outside their store.

Balsa, coffee stirrers, felt tip pens, and a bought bird house – all this saved me time, paint and mess especially having no workshop and few woodwork skills. Like Bob Cordery’s greyed dayglo castle, I may add some flock but the base feels like a wooden veranda or porch.

IMG_0225

A happy bit of “Kit Bashing” on the kitchen table, which certainly saved me some woodwork. It should provide an interesting focus to a suitable backwoods scenario game.

If anyone asks what I do outside work, I can say I am now a proud home owner or property developer, renovating an interesting period property with no previous owners.

IMG_0226

Or should I have painted up my carefully hoarded boxed 1978 Airfix Bluetits kit from their Nature Series and let them move in?

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 9 June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Of Semaphore and Signal Towers

IMG_0053
From Clementine box to fortified signal tower ….

I have posted two new posts on my sister blog Pound Store Plastic Warriors,  all about the fun of making this semaphore signal tower for coast, mountain or desert from available scrap, a suitable toy soldier type fortified building for 30 mm to 54mm figure games.

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/scratchbuilt-desert-or-coastal-signal-tower/

IMG_0070
Some of my Peter Laing 15mm British colonial troops and heliograph. 

Some of the design ideas came from researching the fascinating history of flag and flash, semaphore and heliograph, which forms the subject of  my second post here:

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/by-heliograph-and-semaphore/

Blog posted by Mark, Man of TIN, May 2017.

 

John Mitchell Card Buildings

image
40 years on from their first design, I’m making one of the late John Mitchell’s  card buildings for 15mm figures as a small and ongoing tribute to John in my tabletop games.

mitchell cottages

 

mitchell farm
John Mitchell 15mm building sheets no 1 and 2 (JM1 and JM2?)

As mentioned in my previous tribute to the late John Mitchell,

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/19/simple-ecw-starter-rules-a-john-mitchell-tribute/

here are two of my surviving unmade John Mitchell buildings photographed so that fellow Peter Laing enthusiasts can build again and attack or defend their own John Mitchell tribute town.

What finer tribute can there be for a wargames designer’s products than for them to live on and give pleasure long after him?

image
Scalpel –  check. Cutting board – check. Peter Laing Union rifleman to advise on scale – check. John Mitchell Building Sheet No. 2 Farmhouse – check. Ready to go!

My original John Mitchell card buildings from the 1980s have not survived.

Luckily two of my spare original sheets have survived. I scanned and printed these onto card to preserve the originals.

image
Cutting out the farmhouse pieces.

40 years after they were designed in 1976 by John Mitchell, these buildings are back being made on my cutting board. They were first designed not long after Peter Laing launched his first 15mm figures in 1972.

I remember making this farmhouse before c. 1983 and had few difficulties.

The farmhouse chimney sits a little oddly, so needs an additional flap added along on its left side before you cut it out.

Additionally a larger fold-over flap at the top of the single house wall with door is needed to get a level roof; just align the new flap with the height of the other wall with a door.

image
The finished basic Farmhouse model defended by my small advisor. I’ve marked up in red on the cut-out sheet overlaid on the original where flaps need to be altered or added in future.

John Mitchell made suggestions for adapting the basic card model as “base for experimentation e.g. Painting walls in poster colour, texturing walls and roofs in plastic filler and adding beams and window frames in balsa wood.

John mentioned his intention to work across “all periods of history” towards “Castles, and other large constructions” not just these slightly humbler 15mm dwellings.

Launching his buildings not long after Peter Laing launched his first 15mm figures in 1972, the only other building I came across mentioned (but sadly never bought) was the JM5 desert type dwelling mentioned in this Peter Laing advert in the early to mid 80s, a snip at 40p.

Not sure what the Barrack Room range was.

image
Another Peter Laing  range I wish I had bought more of along with John Mitchell’s card JM5 desert buildings. Oh well,  there’s always the Airfix Desert outpost and Foreign legion fort.

So if JM1 was the Elizabethan house, JM2 the Farmhouse / Barn and JM5 the Desert building, does anyone know or can show what JM3, JM4 and JM6 onwards were?

I’d be interested to see more of them.

image
Unpainted John Mitchell card farmhouse JM2 ready for action with garrison of Peter Laing Northern troops on my portable hex game board. (Photo / figures: Man of TIN.)

Enjoy building your John Mitchell tribute houses and may you have many happy hours with these as a pivotal battlefield feature to defend or attack in John Mitchell’s memory.

Posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, August 2016.

Poundstore Palm Trees

Today’s visual inspiration on our Cakes of Death DIY figures and gaming blog theme strand are these Tiger.com high street stores palm trees.

 

image.jpg

Why pay expensive hobby prices for palm trees, when you can get all these for a pound?

image

What to do with a dozen or so pink flamingoes?

How many pink flamingo paint stirrers do you need?

Alternatively decorate a model lawn with them.

Or even better for a gaming blog with DIY figures made from silicon cake mould figures and Polymer Clay Fimo, why not create some handy edible desert islands?

image

Or why not create a Donald Featherstone tribute display? Our gaming hero Donald Featherstone (1918 – 2013) shares his name (and a Wikipiedua disambiguation redirect thingy)  with Don Featherstone, U.S. designer of the pink garden flamingo ornament (1936  – 2015).

image.jpg
Man of TIN’s tribute to both men called Donald Featherstone! 

posted by Mr MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.