FEMbruary Post No. 4 A Woman’s Right to Vote and Serve MARCH

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My FEMBruary Challenge Number 1 has been going well, to photograph, share and celebrate some of the female figures in my toy soldier collection.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/fembruary-hobby-challenge-conversions/

Today’s figure combines the women’s right to vote Centenary on 6 February 2018 and the wider focus on women’s role in the war as part of WW100 and the First World War Centenary Partnership.

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A handy little biography is included with each figure.
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Emmeline Pankhurst – Part of the 2006 Corgi Forward March range

At the outbreak of war in 1914, Emmeline Pankhurst’s Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), one of the leading voices for women’s suffrage, had firmly decided to embrace the war effort.

She halted their increasingly militant and destructive campaign for women’s suffrage for the duration of the war. This move divided  her family and the suffragette movement.

Emmeline Pankhurst redirected her efforts to push for an increased role for women in support of the war, particularly in industrial jobs, so that women could directly help the war effort.

The “shell scandal” of lack of artillery shells and munitions for the British troops in 1915 saw a need to put more workers into the munitions factories to replace those male workers left for military service.

On March 17 1915 the Board of Trade set up the Women’s War Service Register to pair willing women with jobs in war industries. Some parts of the British government was not overly enthusiastic about the plan. By the end of 1915, only 8500 of the 42000 registered women had been matched to jobs.

On July 17 1915, Emmeline Pankhurst and the WSPU organized the Women’s Right to Serve march in London, in support of the hiring of women in the munitions industry, demanding the same pay as men.

This “Right To Serve” would doubly contribute to the war effort, both by producing munitions and freeing up men to serve on the front.

The  Women’s Right to Serve march received direct support from Lloyd George’s Ministry of Munitions. Despite these efforts, hiring of women into jobs vacated by men  via the government Register set up for the purpose remained lacklustre  throughout the rest of 1915.

More about the women’s Right to Serve March at

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/world-history/history-of-the-first-world-war-in-100-moments/a-history-of-the-first-world-war-in-100-moments-british-women-demand-a-share-of-the-burden-9322644.html

Photographs at the National Archive of the Right to Serve March

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/britain1906to1918/g4/cs4/g4cs4s1a.htm

There is an interesting photograph on this Alexander Palace blog showing Emmeline Pankhurst with Maria Bochkariev.

“Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst, who had arrived in Russia in June 1917, showed her appreciation of the wonderful sacrifice made by the women of the the Battalion of Death by becoming an ardent champion of Maria Bochkarieva. The latter, in turn, appreciated Mrs. Pankhurst’s sympathy, and a warm friendship sprang up between these two leaders of women.”

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/thompson/93pankhurst.html

Mrs Pankhurst and the Battalion of Death – There’s a FEMbruary double for you that I didn’t expect.

Time is running out with only a week left of FEMBruary, I’m not sure if my third FEMbruary challenge, converting a Mexican peasant woman figure into a Suffragette will be complete in a week. If only I could find an extension of the FEMbruary painting challenge into March somehow?

Maybe I could finish my suffragette over the next week or two. Aha! There’s always #MARCH, the MARCHing figure, MARCHing parade or MARCHing band painting challenge that I just thought of. Sweet Procrastination!

It is according to the blog of CupcakesandMachetes, also Women’s History Month in March,  and so has already linked to blogger Imperial Rebel Ork, who was my accidental introduction to FEMbruary via the Suburban Militarism blog.

https://cupcakesandmachetes.wordpress.com/2018/02/21/blog-event-celebrate-the-ladies/

Women’s History Month is always held in March so that it coincides with the celebration of International Women’s Day on March 8. In 2018, Women’s History Month will run from March 1 to March 31 and is marked in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5390421/Womens-History-Month-2018-need-know.html#ixzz57mglvMZs

International Women’s Day (IWD) has occurred for well over a century, with the first​ ​March 8​ ​IWD gathering supported by over a million people in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland. Prior to this the​ Socialist Party of America, United Kingdom’s Suffragists and Suffragettes, and further groups campaigned for women equality. Today, IWD belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. IWD is not country, group or organisation specific.​ Make IWD your day! – everyday! https://www.internationalwomensday.com

It probably started in 1908 / 1909 New York and has been on March 8th since 1913 http://www.un.org/en/events/womensday/history.shtml

In 2011, former US President Barack Obama coined or proclaimed March to be ‘Women’s History Month’.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/life/international-womens-day-did-start-important/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN on 21st FEMbruary 2018.

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Territorial Terror

IMG_2842A comic postcard from 1911 with an interesting WW1 story on the back.

Crossposted from my occasional blog Sidetracked

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/territorial-terror/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN 15 January 2018

Remembrance, Great War and Little Wars

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An edited quote from H.G. Wells’ Little Wars (1913) in Donald Featherstone’s War Games (1962)

Armistice and Remembrance Weekend – a suitable time to reflect, in this case on the WW1 Centenary, Poppy or Armistice Day 99 years on and a 104 year old book by H.G. Wells.

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Written by H G Wells in 1913, being the final page of Little Wars.

Something to think about as we mark another 11th November 99 years on and another Remembrance Sunday.

The extended original quote also available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3691/3691-h/3691-h.htm

Posted by Mark, Man of TIN blog,  November 11th  and 12th, 2017

 

Innovation in Combat – WW1 Wireless and Telegraph blog

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Peter Laing 15mm British Colonial or WW1 infantry with comms team ancient and modern  – a bugler and a heliograph operator.

Interesting WW1 signalling and comms innovation  blogpost with archive  photographs and many interesting articles.

In some game scenarios, failure of interception in comms and orders may have a big or random effect on  the game scenario outcome.

Your carrier pigeon or messenger dog is killed, your telephone lines are broken by shellfire, your advance orders are read by the opposing player, no signal to reinforce or retire is received so your troops fight on in the same position through counter attack after counter attack. All these are interesting random events that might affect a scenario outcome. All these were likely or real problems in WW1 communications such as at Passchendaele.

At last a use for all those wiring party troops, carrier pigeon troops and flag signallers in Airfix WW1 OO/HO infantry boxes.

Passchendaele article on written by Dr Elizabeth Bruton http://blogs.mhs.ox.ac.uk/innovatingincombat/category/wireless-telegraph/

Royal Navy naval comms and SigInt in early WW1

http://blogs.mhs.ox.ac.uk/innovatingincombat/guest-post-by-len-barnett-learning-to-use-signals-intelligence-in-the-royal-navy-1914-1915/

Brief mention of the formative experience for J R R Tolkien of being a WW1 signals officer on the Western Front https://percyswar.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/more-communication-fullerphone/

A subject explored more in John Garth, Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle Earth, 2005. Historical events and historical figure gaming meets Fantasy!

Naval Raiding Party Gaming Scenario

An exciting WW1 naval raiding party scenario could be formed out of this interesting piece on Wireless Interception in WW1 based around coastal listening stations such as Hippisley Hut in Hunstanton Norfolk. Just what Marines are for!

http://blogs.mhs.ox.ac.uk/innovatingincombat/hippisley-hut-hunstanton-wireless-interception-world-war-one/

A scenario with a chance to use my recently scrap built desert or coastal telegraph station or in fact any lighthouse model that you happen to have lying around:

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/by-heliograph-and-semaphore

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An improvised coastal setting for my wireless telegraph station with 54mm lead or hollowcast  Royal Navy crew. The old unclimbable ‘felt cloth over books’ cliffs may be a slight gaming problem …

Anyway an interesting WWI website to read and ponder.

https://content.historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/first-world-war-wireless-stations-england/first-world-war-wireless-stations-in-england.pdf/

For the dedicated researcher of WW1 SigInt and Naval Signals you can now stay in Hippisley Hut http://www.norfolkcoastholidaycottages.co.uk/hippisley-hut-hunstanton

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, October 2017

 

Toys from the Scrapheap

 

 

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TOYS FROM THE SCRAP-HEAP

An interesting toy soldier scrap to add to my scrapbook collection, dated roughly to 1919 / 1920 from the news items on the back.

Toys from the Scrap-heap

A discharged soldier of Deptford turns his ingenious hand to making toys from margarine boxes and various odds and ends , such as knitting needles.

It is an attractive castle that I’m sure any boy would be delighted to receive as a present. Lots of levels, bristling with field guns with a  good parade space in front.

It has an unusual bridge style drawbridge, a full parade of toy soldiers and a tiny glimpse of (handmade?) toy battleships.

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Rough photos of this clipping don’t show much detail, I shall try to scan it in more pixelated detail when next possible.

I wonder if the double or modern meaning of being on the employment scrap heap as an injured veteran facing the economic troubles and postwar crash of the 1920s and 1930s had quite happened yet. The photograph caption instead seems to applaud this discharged serviceman’s quiet determination to make something from nothing, of skill and industry well applied, as something to be proud of.

The unnamed Deptford soldier appears to be wearing on his lapel   a regimental metal badge or possibly the silver badge issued to discharged or invalided soldiers.

Hopefully he found some therapy and income from his talents, as well as cheering many young children.

In the 1920s it is often said that toy soldier companies developed more ‘pacifist’, civilian or non-military ranges such as the Home Farm, railway figures, gardens and others. This change and these ranges  are excellently covered in Norman Joplin’s brilliantly comprehensive The Great Book Of Hollow-Cast Figures (New Cavendish, 1993/99).

Toy Workshops for disabled and discharged war veterans

The same Joplin book features amongst the many manufacturers, an intriguing advert and some toy soldiers from Lord Roberts and Lord Kitchener’s Workshop for injured soldiers, painting toy soldier  castings from various manufacturers c. 1916

Well worth tracking down a copy of this well illustrated Joplin book.

Judging by the Dundee example, some of these workshops survived until very recently (2010) and may still exist?  http://archiveshub.ac.uk/data/gb254-ms319

After the First World War there must have been thousands of such injured veterans, competing for work during the difficult economic times of the 1920s and 1930s. Dolls houses, furniture and board games like Bombardo were made postwar alongside the wartime painting of toy soldiers.

The following websites cover more about the Lord Roberts Memorial Workshop:

http://www.dollshousespastandpresent.com/issue17june2013p4.htm

http://outofbattle.blogspot.co.uk/2007/09/lord-roberts-memorial-workshops.html

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30087

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Lord_Roberts_Memorial_Workshops

http://www.illustratedfirstworldwar.com/item/a-great-institution-for-employing-disabled-soldiers-and-sailors-the-lord-iln0-1917-0901-0017-001/

 

More about Discharged and Demobilised  Soldiers 

A close up of the man’s lapel badge suggests that he may be a medically discharged soldier, rather than demobilised.

http://www.1914-1918.net/soldiers/swbrecords.html

http://www.1914-1918.net/demobilisation.htm

http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/a-soldiers-life-1914-1918/the-evacuation-chain-for-wounded-and-sick-soldiers/

Posted by Mark, Man of TIN blog, December 2016.