“That more intelligent sort of girl who likes boys’ games and books”

 

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Nice field gun! I wonder if this Mademoiselle Strategie was “that sort of intelligent girl” that H.G. Wells had in mind who would enjoy playing his Little Wars ? Xavier Sager  postcard, “Strategy” c. or pre WW1.

 

“Little Wars: a game for boys from twelve years of age to one hundred and fifty and for that more intelligent sort of girl who likes boys’ games and books” is the long and unusual title of H.G. Wells famous book that started modern war gaming back in 1913.

H.G. Wells had an eye for intelligent girls or ladies, such as Amber Reeves, a pioneering feminist Socialist student at Cambridge University  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber_Reeves with whom Wells had a child outside marriage in 1909. Wells called Amber  “Dusa”, a shortened form of his pet name (!) for her of Medusa.

Wells proved himself to be more than just the father of modern war gaming!

The years before Floor Games (1911), an account of floor games with his two sons,   led onto the “Sandgate Cannonade” of Little Wars (1913) were certainly busy ones for Wells, personally and professionally.

I wonder if this Xavier Sager designed Strategie / Strategy postcard girl  is “the sort of intelligent girl who likes boys games and books” that Wells had in mind? It’s certainly a nice field gun shooting at what looks like tiny men or toy soldiers.

I came across this curious “Little Wars” style postcard online attached to a completely unrelated foreign language medical website about heart disease.

I was puzzled – Any reason why it was on a medical website?

It’s an interesting little card from somewhere in the early 1900s through to WW1. Look carefully and you will see that the ammunition for her toy gun is hearts!

What Strategy is it that she proposes?

Why the Gulliver Lilliputian style differences in size between giant lady and puny male victims?

Are these her tiny fallen lovers?

Is she a Femme Fatale figure? A Dusa or mythical fate spinner, a fatal woman?

What of the tiny fallen or wounded figures on the floor, including one in uniform, cursing or crying out? He must have a very revealing view of  Mademoiselle “Strategie”.

What would the spirited Amber Reeves make of it all?

Strategy was produced as a comic or satirical postcard by Xavier Sager.  Sager was a European  postcard artist whom I had not heard of before but a quick internet search reveals him to have been most prolific.

However  little appears online or in print about Sager’s life. Xavier Sager may have been born in Austria in 1870 or 1881 and died in the USA in 1930. He mostly illustrated Paris life in the first few years of the 1900s. You can see many of his designs here and on Pinterest:

https://aboutcards.blogspot.com/2006/12/xavier-sager-belle-epoch-postcard.html

http://perso.wanadoo.es/xsager/_marcs-eng.htm

French website: http://wilfrid-sager.blogg.org

Sager’s image reminds me of this curious Gibson Girls comic drawing by American artist Charles Dana Gibson entitled “The Weaker Sex” (1903).

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Caption this for female Wargamers or modellers?!? Sager’s images reminds me of this curious 1903 Gibson Girls drawing by American artist Charles Dana Gibson entitled “The Weaker Sex” (Wikipedia image source public domain)

Xavier Sager reputedly produced over 3000 designs of what in America would later be called pin ups, nose cone art  and far more relaxed and revealing than the fashionable Gibson Girls of America at the time.

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Howard Chandler Christy WW1 poster
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Howard Chandler Christy WW1 US poster

These Sager postcards are much more similar in cheeky style to the Howard Chandler Christy girls of WW1 American forces recruiting.

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Lots of “military terms” or puns illustrated on postcards by Xavier Sager c. France WW1. As the old saying goes, Time spent in Reconnaissance is seldom wasted!

Many of the military ones seem focussed on cheeky, erotic or patriotic subjects such as flags, national songs, uniforms and female company for Allied soldiers including the Americans after their 1917 entry into WW1. They must have sold like hot cakes or donuts to the American doughboys.

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Bersaglieri, part of a Sager postcard series on Allied national flags and uniforms  WW1. A similar female Bersaglieri postcard by Sager exists.

This post is for Marvin, a talented painter of WW1 miniatures!

These  images sit interestingly alongside the fantastical and unrealistic images of women or girl soldiers that Marvin of the Suburban Militarism blog has been researching, alongside the real female soldiers and support services https://suburbanmilitarism.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/girl-soldier/

There are plenty of Xavier Sager’s collectable vintage postcard images for sale online or viewable on Pinterest, if you want to look up his work any further, along with websites below.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 26 August 2018

B.P.S. Blog Post Script 

Mademoiselle Strategie with her ammunition of hearts may well be the female version of the man collecting a Jar of Hearts (conquests, hopefully, not real human organs) in Christina Perri’s recent song Jar of Hearts, better heard in the remix of the  time travelling Postmodern Jukebox, court musicians to the Duke of Tradgardland. Enjoy!

https://youtu.be/G_4Qf2yV0KQ

 

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Remembrance, Great War and Little Wars

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An edited quote from H.G. Wells’ Little Wars (1913) in Donald Featherstone’s War Games (1962)

Armistice and Remembrance Weekend – a suitable time to reflect, in this case on the WW1 Centenary, Poppy or Armistice Day 99 years on and a 104 year old book by H.G. Wells.

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Written by H G Wells in 1913, being the final page of Little Wars.

Something to think about as we mark another 11th November 99 years on and another Remembrance Sunday.

The extended original quote also available at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3691/3691-h/3691-h.htm

Posted by Mark, Man of TIN blog,  November 11th  and 12th, 2017

 

More Duelling Inspiration: Bartitsu

 

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Edward Barton Wright montage (Wikipedia public domain source) 

Lots of steampunk Sherlock Holmes era self defence, umbrella duelling etc – don’t try this at home  – on this interesting website about E.W. Barton Wright, 1860-1951,  the inventor of Bart-itsu. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_William_Barton-Wright

Bartitsu.org is a fascinating website or blog,  written by James Marwood since 2008, is a real labour of love, researching this once-forgotten pioneer of the martial arts.

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2010/09/in-memoriam-e-w-barton-wright-8-nov-1860-13-sept-1951/

How to use your cane and hat (shield ) to defend yourself – a short silent film by James Marwood.

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2008/08/self-defence-for-discerning-ladies-and-gentlemen/

Lots more ravishing images of  duelling in suitable clothing

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2010/05/

This all fits well with Gerard Du Gre’s simple “Lunge, Cut and Stop Thrust” skirmish duelling rules from Donald Featherstone’s Solo Wargaming. https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/duelling-in-the-sandpit-lunge-cut-and-stop-thrust/

I wonder how many manufacturers make these kind of gents and ruffians?

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Playmobil certainly do top hat figures like Dracula. Somewhere amongst the many interesting steampunk and VSF miniatures, other figures might be found wielding sticks, umbrellas and walking canes etc. I searched the toy box and my collection for a few suitable figures:

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Dr. Watson with stick in hand confronted by a Ruffian with a stick after his medical bag, no doubt. (Sherlock and Watson are Tradition Of London  figures, home cast Prince August policeman, pound store plastic pirate moll and Wendal farmer hooligan with stick.)
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And never forget the simple rule – “those who live by the sword (stick) get shot by those who don’t.” Watch out for that lady!

Edith Garrud taught Jiu-jitsu to suffragettes protecting Mrs Pankhurst which became known as Suffra-Jitsu. See also Miss Sanderson or Madame Vigny http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2015/11/solved-the-mystery-of-miss-sandersons-first-name/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2014/05/policewomen-training-in-jiujitsu-1914/

A Match for Any Ruffian! Ladies Self Defence 1902 style

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2009/06/self-defence-with-an-umbrella-daily-mirror-jan-9-1902/

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Against a determined lady armed only with a hat pin, umbrella and a handful of distraction devices, I don’t much rate the survival chances of these two mean-looking characters with cudgels! Who needs a sturdy Footman? 

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2009/05/the-umbrella-a-misunderstood-weapon/

“The umbrella is distinctly a form of rapier; the husband-beater is a hand-and-a-half estoc (to be used in the saddle, if required); and the sunshade and parasol are short swords, or long daggers: and one and all are designed for thrusting— not cutting.

Yet how does the citizen use his characteristic weapon ? Why, as a broadsword—nearly always!”

from “The Umbrella:  A Misunderstood Weapon” Bartitsu.org website

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From “The Umbrella as a Misunderstood Weapon” blog post, Bartitsu.org website

And going back a period to the Brontes (hooray, Arise Angria! etc) and late Regency / early Victorian period, 1838 Baron Charles Du Berenger’s Defensive Gymnastics:

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2010/05/baron-charles-de-berengers-defensive-gymnastics-1838/

Not forgetting  Captain F.C. Laing of the 12th Bengal Infantry (Kelat-I-Ghilzai Regiment) who spent several months doing intensive training at the London Bartitsu Club.

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2016/10/attacked-by-a-man-with-a-stick-in-his-hand-an-interpretation-of-captain-laings-first-bartitsu-set-play/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2016/10/a-man-without-a-stick-rushes-at-you-with-his-fist-an-interpretation-of-captain-laings-second-bartitsu-set-play/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2015/10/to-invite-an-attack-tactical-guards-in-canonical-bartitsu-stick-fighting/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2014/03/captain-laing-on-adapting-bartitsu-stick-fighting-to-army-swordsmanship/

Lots more Edwardian / Victorian military gents in the original Bartitsu Club

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2009/04/members-of-the-original-bartitsu-club/

Egerton Castle’s Rapier training and Ancient Swordplay revival

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2015/12/egerton-castles-rapier-and-cloak-vs-rapier-and-dagger/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2014/07/ancient-swordplay-the-revival-of-elizabethan-fencing-in-victorian-london-2/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2010/08/bartitsu-and-historical-fencing/

Edwardian Paintball – harmless duelling with wax bullets?

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2011/12/paintball-edwardian-style-bloodless-duelling-with-wax-bullets-circa-1908/

Edwardian Lady Detective Judith Lee

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2011/11/i-am-a-woman-but-no-weakling-judith-lee-lady-detective/

Over almost a decade the Bartitsu website has thrown some interesting people nad pictures including:

The Simms Motor Scout, one of the world’s first armed motor vehicles?

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Simms’ Motor Scout 1899 (Wikipedia source)

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2011/03/hooligans-beware/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motor_Scout

and his Simms War Car, again possibly the world’s first armoured car?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motor_War_Car

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Simms’ War Car at the Crystal Palace, 1902 (Wikipedia source) 

I’m sure H.G. Wells would approve of Simms’ inventiveness and foresight. This 1899 invention narrowly missed deployment in the Boer War: “Because of difficulties, including a gearbox destroyed by a road accident, that arose during completion the prototype was not finished by Vickers until 1902 when the Boer War was over”. Now there is a “What If?” Boer War gaming scenario.  The French version with a Russian Army connection looks even more modern –  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charron,_Girardot_et_Voigt_1902

Noted Bartitsu historian Emelyne Godfrey has written several books and articles  on crime and self defence in Victorian Britain.

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2010/10/masculinity-crime-and-self-defence-in-victorian-literature/

http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/2011/01/page/2/

All fascinating stuff – don’t try Umbrella Fencing at home without suitable head protection  – from a website and area  which throws up lots of interesting duelling scenarios for Gerard Du Gre’s “Lunge, Cut and Stop Thrust” rules.

Scenarios and figures? 

At last a gaming use for all those civilian figures, ladies with parasols, farmers with sticks, useless cameo cowboys and soldier figures  clubbing with rifles, drum majors with their batons etc.

Part of the role of the Militia in Britain throughout Napoleonic, Regency and Victorian times was crowd control, as set out in Jenny Uglow’s In These Times (reviewed earlier on this blog). Rioters, luddites and mobs of protesters often armed only with pitchforks, cudgels and tools would be broken up or scared off by calling out the Militia. The Riot Act would be read etc, etc.

The Militia  formed this role of suppression or public order before an organised police force in Victorian times. Jenny Uglow is very even-handed in her views on the British Government’s use of the Volunteers and Militia to suppress dissent or keep order during a surprisingly turbulent time of food riots, resistance of the press-gang, Highland clearances and labour disputes.

An Angrian police force or constabulary in top hat,  blue tail coat and cutlass  appear in the Charlotte  Bronte Angria juvenilia stories in her early Victorian  novella “Henry Hastings”. They are sent to all points of the compass, tracking down this escaped treacherous murdering deserter!

While some early top hatted policemen with their leather stock neck pieces (against garrotting gangs) carried a cutlass, traditionally British police have been unarmed. What is the police truncheon or American patrol officers night stick however but an extension of this Bartitsu type approach of self defence? Highwaymen beware!

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Before and after … front and back views … or How not to upset the Broom Lady out of Steve Weston’s excellent Mexican Peasants set. 

Not forgetting those ever so useful handy Steve Weston Mexican Peasant figures, some of which would have a distinctively Boxer / Oriental / Street Fighting appearance with suitable painting. http://www.plasticsoldiers.co.uk/reg-pages/Weston%20Toy%20Co.

Off to track down some more useful ‘useless’ posed figures for more duelling in the mean streets, backyards, gardens and sandpits of my Imagi-Nations …

Meanwhile in the leafy Edwardian garden of my imagination

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If  any Ruffian  snuck up on H. G. Wells in his garden whilst busy playing Little Wars, sorry I meant  researching his next book, no doubt Wells would snatch up a nearby garden cane, whip off his straw hat and Have at Them! En Garde-ns!

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Lunge, Cut and Stop Thrust – this could almost be H.G. Wells versus Edward Barton Wright. (Wikipedia source montage). 

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN blog, April 28 2017.

How to Feed Toy Soldiers

 

imagePicked up in a second hand bookshop years ago is an illustrated copy of this E. Nesbit Short story The Town In the Library, first published in 1901.

How to Feed Toy Soldiers …

This out of print 1987 Macdonald / Beehive Books edition of the Edith Nesbit story has interesting illustrations of toy soldiers by illustrator Shirley Tourret who died in 2007.

Some of the aspects of the story are an interesting and magical realist mixture of kaleidoscopic Chinese puzzle ‘box inside a box’ / ‘world inside a fantasy world’ of Lewis Carroll and H.G. Wells Floor Games and Little Wars. It is the familiar floor world of Wells’ Little Wars world of the Edwardian Nursery.

Two children Rosalind and Fabian are quarantined at home with measles on Christmas Eve. They are forbidden to open the top drawers of a bureau / desk but of course do and discover their Christmas treats and toys including blue and red toy soldiers.

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The short story from Nesbit’s 1901 book Nine Unlikely Tales is played out amongst buildings and forts made of books, in a H.G. Wells style but ideas of scale are played around with throughout the story and the children appear to shrink into this world or town inside their house’s library.

The blue toy soldiers appear out of their wood and straw box in a novel and exciting way – abseiling down the wood shavings to the floor below, a decorative feat in full Napoleonic gear.

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Thus is nicely pictured by Shirley Tourret with the soldier climbing down  the side of the text to the book’s floor.

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A similar abseiling paper soldier was recently featured in an innovative and imaginative 2010 art residency Remnants by Su Blackwell https://www.bronte.org.uk/contemporary-arts/artists-in-haworth/su-blackwell  at the Bronte Parsonage Museum, depicting the heroic characters leaping to imaginative life of the Bronte children’s juvenilia (Angria, Gondal and Glasstown) – see Pinterest,  http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/pdf/papermodels/blackwellcs.pdf or Su Blackwell’s website for more of  the images.

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Su Blackwell’s Remnants exhibition 2010 inspired by Bronte juvenilia at the Bronte Parsonage Museum. Photo: Su Blackwell website.

Captured by the blue toy soldiers, the children are persuaded to feed them their Christmas treats in a novel and unusual way. “I suppose you know how tin soldiers are fed?” Edith Nesbit / the narrator asks:

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The children are rescued by the traditional red coated heroes (Nesbit’s story was written in 1901 at the height of Empire after all) which Shirley Tourret depicts in almost 18th Century uniform and head gear. They are nicely portrayed amongst a battlement of books.

All very H.G. Wells and Little Wars …

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The story cleverly ends with the two children reappearing in their real nursery / library proper sized again but suffering from the fever of oncoming measles. So was it all a feverish dream or was it?

The book is an interesting mix of period uniforms, and absurd ideas for gaming scenarios such as the blue Napoleonic troops abseiling in full dress and shako.

The figures are stiffly posed in a toyness fashion when glimpsed as toys in some pictures but within the world of the bookish “Town in The Library” of the title and the children’s feverish imaginations the Toy Soldiers appear more animated, alive and human. This is cleverly distinguished in Shirley Tourret’s illustrations.

A sad postscript

The things you learn whilst exploring the world of toy soldiers.

As well as finding out about illustrators, you discover interesting things about the authors too.

Exploring Edith Nesbit’s life on Wikipedia, I found that Fabian and Rosamund the two children in the book are named after her own complicated family of birth and adopted children including a son Fabian, who died aged 15 in 1900, the year before this story was published in 1901.  She also was one of the nine founders of  the socialist Fabian Society in 1884 with her husband Hubert Bland, and her son Fabian was named after the society.

Nesbit’s children were Paul Bland (1880–1940), to whom The Railway Children was dedicated; Iris Bland (1881-1950s); Fabian Bland (1885–1900); Rosamund Bland (1886–1950), to whom The Book of Dragons was dedicated; and John Bland (1898–1971) to whom The House of Arden was dedicated.

Her son Fabian died aged 15 after a tonsil operation; Nesbit dedicated a number of books to him: Five Children and It and its sequels, as well as The Story of the Treasure Seekers and its sequels. Nesbit’s adopted daughter Rosamund collaborated with her on the book Cat Tales. (Wikipedia source: E.Nesbit)

At least Fabian lives on through this story.

Blogposted by Mr MIN, Man  of TIN, September 2016.

Close Little Wars scenarios and inspiration

Retail Design World website / newsletter is an unusual read for a gamer (it informs part of my day job) but it has pages  of VM (Visual Merchandising) inspirations inspired by exhibitions, shop windows and other unusual  objects.

In the same way, I’m sure each gamer has their own scrap box, postcard, Pinterest board, DVD and bookshelf inspirations for their current games.

Here are some inspirations and scenarios I’ve  come across whilst developing Donald Featherstone’s simplest two page rules Close Wars (Appendix 2) of his 1962 War Games, my favourite gaming book.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/close-little-wars-featherstones-simplest-rules/

A keen Colonial gamer, Featherstone was focussed here on “the type of fighting that happens between small numbers of men in forests, such as in the French and Indian Wars of the late eighteenth century in America” (page 149).

My version has morphed over years into what I call “Close Little Wars“, “Bish Bash Bush” or “Bish Bash Am-Bush“, mash-up simple rules inspired by hex games, H.G. Wells, garden wargames, skirmish games and a passion for cheap plastic or glossy toy soldiers.

Scenarios of natives versus troops: 

A recent Christmas book token was swiftly transformed into five Osprey books, all with Close Little Wars applications. In no particular order:

  1. Teutoberg Forest AD 9: The Destruction of Varus and His Legions by Michael McNally Osprey Camapign 228

Close Little Wars scenarios for Airfix Romans meeting  Airfix Ancient Britons. Or maybe my Cakes of Death inspired ‘Ancient Warrior’ figure?

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2. Fort William Henry 1755-57: A Battle, Two Sieges and Bloody Massacre by Ian Castle, Osprey Campaign 260 

3. Tomahawk and Musket: French and Indian Raids in the Ohio Valley 1758 by Rene Chartrand, Osprey Raid series no. 27

Slightly later in the eighteenth century, the Revolutionary Wars in North America provide another Close Little Wars type scenario:

4. The Swamp Fox: Francis Marion’s Campaign in the Carolinas 1780 by David R. Higgins, Osprey  Raid Series no. 42. 

On another continent or island, New Zealand:

5. The New Zealand Wars 1820-72 by Ian Knight, Osprey Men at Arms series No. 487

The New Zealand Wars of Pa forts and Pakeha European troops versus successful Maori natives was a period I first read about in a series of articles in Miniature Wargames  (issues 27 to 29 August to October 1985) brought home  for the history articles by my Dad. Andy Callan also published a short set of Maori  Wars rules in Military Modelling in 1983; I never got the hang of them from the tattered magazine I bought from our school library but they had great pictures of Peter Laing figures attacking a twig stockade on shaggy deep pile carpet terrain!

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Each of these Osprey books temptingly has a back page full of Related Titles on www.ospreypublishing.com  Tempting but expensive. There’s always second hand, EBay or the library ….

Figures for Close Little Wars 

1. 40mm HE figures Holgar  Eriksonn figures from Prince August sourced home casting moulds – Cowboys and Indians, Seven Years War / 18th Century figures.

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-cowboys-and-indians-he/

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-seven-years-war-moulds/

http://shop.princeaugust.ie/40mm-french-regiments-1750/

Enjoy their wide range: http://shop.princeaugust.ie/moulds-by-theme/

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2. 30mm Spencer Smith Miniatures of American Civil War / Wild West / Eighteenth Century / American War Of Independence – first bought in plastic, still available in metal and many designed by Holger Eriksonn!

http://www.spencersmithminiatures.co.uk/html/ssm.html

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Close up of excellent 30mm settler figures in buckskins and raccoon skin hats, Spencer Smith miniatures (photo / collection: Man of TIN)

I will post a separate blog post on using these charming simple Spencer Smith 30mm figures for Little   Close Wars.

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3. Vintage Airfix

Ancient Britons and Romans, Washington’s Army, British Grenadiers, Cowboys, Wagon Train, Indians, Union Infantry, Confederate Infantry, American Civil War Artillery, Napoleonic troops, Airfix Gurkhas or Australian Infantry, Japanese Infantry.

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Vintage Airfix 8th Army versus Bedouin desert warriors – desert hexscape for my Close Little Wars scenarios. Photo/ figures: Man of TIN. 

Many other plastic 1:72 figures are now available for almost any period  – I still have some Esci Colonial Infantry,  Zulus and ‘Muslim Warriors’ from the 1980s and the Atlantic ancient Romans, Greeks, Egyptians and fabulous Wild West series with everything from teepee camps, gold mining camps, Buffaloes. All useful for scenarios of Close Little Wars.

But vintage Airfix, big and little, crumbling  as some now vintage ones now, unless if you have the recently reissued Hat or Airfix, remain for me the standard figures for conversion or play.

4. Pound Store plastic Cowboys, Indians, civilians, ‘ancient Warriors’ Romans and Knights. Usually in 54 mm scale.

5. Make your Own from Polymer Clay:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/more-diy-gaming-figure-making/

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/back-to-basics-toy-soldiers/

 

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Little Close Wars Terrain – not seeing the Wood for the Trees: 

Donald Featherstone  raided his Southampton garden for his early gaming materials:

“Trees can be purchased in plastic that look very real and are quite cheap. They can also be made from loofah sponge or from plastic dyed green and stuck onto pieces of twig, or there is style of lichen moss available that makes wonderful trees. When Wargames started in the writer’s house, trees were made plentifully from pine-cones dyed green and fixed to the table with a daub of plasticine. ”  Donald Featherstone, War Games, 1962, page 41.

Featherstone’s Close Wars appendix terrain list is pure garden, park and woodland finds, a proper Nature Table.

If not blessed with a suitable garden source, there is an Australian company Bold Frontiers who make a range of trees to complement its  Armies in Plastic forest rangers and other figures http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au

http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/component/virtuemart/scenery/tree-sets

Not sure if Bold Frontiers  have UK stockists or international shipping for their trees. Armies in Plastic figures are available online from several UK sources including Steve Weston: http://plasticsoldiers.co.uk/index.php/manufacturer/armies-in-plastic/ 

We started with books to inspire interesting figure game scenarios, so let’s end this post with another interesting link on the Bold Frontiers website. As scenarios go, they have an interesting reading list for boys (and girls?) of all ages:

http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/using-our-products/adventure-stories-featuring-forests-and-jungles

Their Wilderness Battle Tactics page quotes some of the same Osprey reading inspiration as I have Above (more full circle): http://www.boldfrontiers.com.au/index.php/using-our-products/wilderness-battle-tactics?showall=&start=2

I admire their slogans and ethos for a new generation of younger gamers, effectively saying to parents buy these for your kids as “the Great Alternative to Digital Games“. Bold Frontiers claim that “Boys can STRETCH their Imaginations and live the Adventure” (Boys? What about girls, including H.G. Wells’ “more Intelligent sort of Girl who likes Boys’ Games and Books“.

They  subtitle their Bold Frontiers site with a slogan close to my garden / gaming heart:  “Bring the great outdoors, indoors!

So get offscreen, grab a bag of poundstore figures, raid the garden  and get gaming!

Posted by Mr. MIN, Man of TIN, June 2016.