Glass Town Wars by Celia Rees – a gaming modern take on the Bronte ImagiNations

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Zombies, attack helicopters, djinn, Faeries, video games tech, Napoleonic riflemen … what more could you want from a book?

The Bronte sisters and brother wrote some lively but fragmented ImagiNations stories full of battles, conquests, intrigue and romance. A Napoleonic Regency Georgian era Game of Thrones

One of the problems in using the surviving Bronte fragments of these tiny handwritten books is that they are very disjointed, only some sections have survived and it takes a long while to sort out who is who, with characters with multiple names. Not promising for someone like me who prefers a simple uncomplicated narrative … but Celia Rees pulls this off cleverly in her fast paced historical fantasy adventure story.

This book was a chance find looking up the ‘Brontes’ and also ‘Wargames’ search terms on my local library catalogue. My interest in this book was that I have been slowly piecing together bits of these stories as ImagiNations gaming scenarios: https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/gaming-the-bronte-family-imaginations-of-glasstown-angria-gondal-and-gaaldine/

Some of my recent Bronte ImagiNations figures repaints from Airfix ACW figures

Celia Rees has written a young adult novel that, using multiple layers of narrative, wraps the broken and fragmented Bronte ImagiNations narrative in with a modern outer story of young techno wizardry and skullduggery.

Tom, a modern teenage boy in a coma,  is watched over in hospital by a quiet girl called Lucy. He is projected by a crooked teenage bitcoin tycoon ‘techno wizard’ Milo Mindbender back from a modern teenage world of hospitals, YouTube, hashtags and social media into a painfully real ‘virtual world’ of a Napoleonic battle zone to meet one of the feisty Bronte female warrior characters, Lady AGA or Augusta.

There is a suggestion that Lucy has been reading Wuthering Heights to Tom whilst he is in his coma.

Readers of Sharpe novels would enjoy this opening Napoleonic skirmishing section. There are later on some wild rough Scots, more 45 Jacobite than Napoleonic, from Sneachiesland who turn into Rogue’s Revolutionary Guard, intent on sacking the capital.

But what if you could actually be inside the game?” argues the villain Mindbender.

How? A secret untested prototype little virtual reality gizmo or gadget called the Echeneis slipped into Tom’s ear is involved, developed for gaming by Mindbender. Unfortunately this is an experimental VR (virtual reality) so intense where you can feel pain, be wounded and potentially die … Game Over for the hashtag #boyinacoma?

The Bronte ImagiNations were inspired by the gift to brother young Branwell Bronte of the Twelves, a dozen wooden Napoleonic soldiers.

Some of the Bronte male characters are borrowed like Percy ‘Rogue’ Duke of Northangerland and his sometime allies or rivals, Lord Charles Wellesley and Douro, both versions of Wellington, along with many minor Bronte characters, are also featured in the peculiar Colonial Tropical Africa / Yorkshire of their Glasstown and Angria ImagiNations.

An epilogue sets out what elements and characters Celia Rees has borrowed from the Bronte family ImagiNations tiny books and the Bronte family’s real lives.

Celia Rees picks up the dystopian, Steampunk elements of the Bronte world and it mixes in well as part of the  science fiction or fantasy genre. There are ‘Fairish’  lands and Underground ‘Deeps’ which bring an edge of Tolkien, pursuit by violent desert storm-like Jinn Spirit Winds and a clunky bit of shamanism. Probably a bit of Yorkshire folklore in here too.

No plot spoilers here but expect the unexpected …

There are small skirmishes with raiding parties with a Reiving medieval feel but made up of Napoleonic troops, laying waste to Augusta’s Northern lands on Percy Rogue’s behalf (he of the Byronic black horse, black banners and black locks). These troops are ambushed by the flint tipped arrows of Robin Goodfellow and the Fairish peoples of the Summer Lord. Flint against Flintlock. Interesting gaming scenarios …

The Capital Glass Town or Verdopolis is riven with revolution, political unrest, Luddite riots and demonstrations, bloodily put down in the manner of the Peterloo Massacre and Chartist Unrest of the 1830s (not far from the events of Charlotte Bronte’s lesser known novel Shirley). A guillotine and echoes of the French Revolution appear.

The multiple layers of modern life, video games and suggestions that we are inside the Bronte dreams of ImagiNations fictions are occasionally alluded to by characters as a kind of dream logic or jarring. The neighbouring countries so different from each other? “the different lands take after their founders“.

One character questions: “I sometimes think that none of it is well, real. Glasstown and all of its people, myself included – we’re mere ideas in someone else’s brain. Part of some other creature’s game…”

There is a fair amount of Regency Ball type behaviour in the Royal Court. Not quite Pride and Prejudice but keep a look out for zombies … well, this adds some Gothic elements.

Later on the Tron or Jumanji film elements of falling into and having to play your way out of a video game are developed and we also enter into the mind, imagination or company of a character who may or may not be Emily Bronte.  Attack helicopters also make a surprise gaming appearance!

The genesis of this book is discussed by Celia here, with inspiration from an attractive Napoleonic rifleman ceramic statuette

http://the-history-girls.blogspot.com/2018/10/glass-town-wars-and-brontes-celia-rees.html

Other similar modern fiction takes on the Bronte Imaginations

An enjoyable and surprising book, much less cluttered and clunky than a lot of the Gondal fan fictions on the internet, which cleverly exploits the gaps and confusions of missing sections of the Bronte’s famous little books.

Jen Burdoo the gamer librarian from the USA introduced me to The Return of the Twelves, an award winning and enjoyable but now forgotten 1963 children’s book by British author Pauline Clarke about the original Twelves, the Bronte toy soldiers that had survived through time, kept alive through the power of the Bronte children’s imagination but lost and forgotten.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Twelve_and_the_Genii

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1472754.The_Return_of_the_Twelves

Last year also saw the publication of Catherynne M. Valente’s hardback doorstep of a book The Great Glass Town Game which I got stuck on halfway through – another attempt needed to read this Alice and Nonsense style inspired Bronte children fantasy http://www.catherynnemvalente.com. It has mixed reviews, often partly on account of its length https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26810460-the-glass-town-game

One to return to …

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 31 August 2019

11 thoughts on “Glass Town Wars by Celia Rees – a gaming modern take on the Bronte ImagiNations”

  1. An impressive find! Another I’ll have to check out. Have been reading Alexander Kent novels about sea officer Richard Bolitho (a contemporary of Horatio Hornblower) and 3D-printing ships of the line for simple wargames at work. Even managed to recreate Hornblower’s one-on-four combat from the novel A Ship of the Line two weeks ago.

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    1. I think you will like this new book. I think young adults will like this book, potentially a good crossover book with video game scenarios / figure gaming / fantasy.

      I am being selective in my reading at the moment before the next book suggests another new Games scenario, period, range of figure required etc.

      I have read the odd Hornblower / Forester type book and grew up with a friend who was a naval gamer. Happy memories of lots of family games of the 60s 70s board game Buccaneer with fabulous tiny model sailing ships.

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    2. Patrick O’Brian is well worth a read. Some reviews liken the writing to that of Jane Austen. I find any other Napoleonic naval novels pale by comparison.

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      1. O’Brian is not my favorite – too complex and contextual for me. I find Bolitho a good mean between the simpler heroic/less descriptive work of Forester and the complexity and period vocabulary of O’Brian.

        Also, Bolitho has a much longer and varied career than either Hornblower or Aubrey. You get a taste of every theater, every type of ship, every class of person, and the feeling that the navy in those days was a real community (because everyone seems to know everybody, and every ship).

        I do like David Drake’s sci-fi version of Aubrey/Maturin, the Leary/Mundy books in which the Maturin expy is a pistol-packing librarian. I used to like Honor Harrington, until she became an admiral and the stories became crammed with secondary characters.

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  2. At school l played naval wargames against a friend with Napoleonic ships. I really enjoyed it. I have been tempted over the years ( especially by the Danish rowed gunboats) but the thought of making a rigged ship fills me with horror. I am intrigued by the mention of simple printed ones.
    The books mentioned in this post sound very intriguing and l will have a look out for them.

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  3. I will look out for Bolitho. The David Drake novels are new to me and sound intriguing,again l will have a look out for them. My late father was a big Hornblower fan and l read some as a boy but wasn’t really into them. My discovery of PB’s novels later in life were a revelation to me. Rightly l think the the whole series has been called “England’s Odyssey” and compared to Austen . I loved the film and was so disappointed when no more were made.
    I do hope we might have a description of the naval games here or even some photos. The people frequenting the library are fortunate to a librarian who provides such memorable games for them to engage in.

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